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Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became a member of the WGA East in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Throwback Thursday: “Bad Labor – No Coffee Break” Movies

Hollywood is filled with movies honoring working people and labor unions. I like labor unions but not everyone does – and well, labor unions (or union leaders) haven’t always been perfect. On Labor Day, we ran a pro-labor list but to reflect that other viewpoint, this edition of Throwback Thursday focuses on a Labor Behaving Badly list – films about bad or crooked union bosses, strikes gone wrong, workers behaving badly, and even a few anti-union films.

On The Waterfront (1954)

This excellent drama from director Elia Kazan is the gold standard of this kind of film, with a corrupt union boss (Lee J. Cobb) who have become a virtual dictator, treating the union like his own little army to do his bidding. One man, Terry Malone (Marlon Brando), stands up to him and breaks the power of the boss. Bad behavior indeed, and one heck of a good movie.

Last Exit to Brooklyn (1989)

Union corruption,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Screenwriter Walter Bernstein at 95: Still Front and Center

Ask Walter Bernstein what makes for a good screenplay, and he’ll answer you with a (possibly apocryphal) story about Henry David Thoreau. “He was living out at Walden Pond and a friend came to tell him that Samuel Morse had just made the first successful wireless telegraph transmission from Boston to Portland, or something like that,” Bernstein says with the practiced storyteller’s delight in a well-told tale. “And Thoreau asked, ‘But what did it say?’ That’s always stuck with me. With all the technology and everything else, what’s it about?”

“What’s it about?” is a question Bernstein, who turned 95 this month, has been asking himself in one form or another for most of his 65-year career, which has stretched from the early days of live television to the modern era of binge watching, and from the lionized “golden age” of the studio system to the low-budget indie renaissance.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch A Young Sidney Poitier And Diahann Carroll Fall In Love In 'Paris Blues'

My post about Diahann Carroll's enchanting cameo in the 1961 film. Goodbye Again (Here), got me thinking about that other black and white film shot in Paris, that she was in that same year, Paris Blues. Directed by Martin Ritt, a great American director who I still think is terribly underrated (Hud, The Molly Maguires, Norma Rae, Sounder), the film is admittedly rather thin, plot-wise. More of a souffle than a full course meal. But it's made with real style, and has a wonderful vibrant feel to it, likely in large credit to a great score by Duke Ellington. And besides, what city in the world looks more beautiful in black and white than Paris? The film revolves around two...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Asc Honoree Dean Cundey Weathered Seismic Changes in Lensers’ Craft

Asc Honoree Dean Cundey Weathered Seismic Changes in Lensers’ Craft
Dean Cundey — the latest recipient the Asc’s highest honor, its Lifetime Achievement Award — might have started out in low-budget genre films, but his career trajectory has led him to the summit of envelope-bursting technology on such films as the “Back to the Future” trilogy, “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” and “Jurassic Park.”

The first two were directed by Robert Zemeckis, who made six films with Cundey. “He doesn’t try to create a magnificent piece of cinematography if it doesn’t serve the story first and foremost,” Zemeckis says. “It’s all about story with Dean.”

What the two created was magnificent and had hardly been seen previously. Discussing “Roger Rabbit” (1988), Cundey, 67, says while earlier movies had combined live-action and animation, the results tended to look “uneven and a bit like comicbooks, whereas we went for a very realistic look.” He shot the film with a VistaVision camera using Eastman 5247 stock,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch Sidney Poitier and Diahann Carroll Fall In Love In 'Paris Blues'

My recent post about Diahann Carroll's enchanting cameo in the 1961 film. Goodbye Again (Here). got me thinking of about that other black and white film shot in Paris that she was in that same year, Paris Blues. Like Goodbye Again, Blues was produced by United Artists, and no doubt, Carroll shot her cameo in Again at the same time thst she was working on Blues. Directed by Martin Ritt, a great American director who I still think is terribly underrated (Hud, The Molly Maguires, Norma Rae, Sounder), the film is admittedly rather thin, plot-wise. More of a souffle than a full course meal. But it's made with real style and has a wonderful vibrant feel to it, no...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

"The Molly Maguires": A Tribute To Henry Mancini's Score

  • CinemaRetro
 

The Molly Maguires was director Martin Ritt's gritty look at Irish coal miners working in Pennsylvania in the 19th century. The film was a costly financial flop despite starring Sean Connery and Richard Harris, but that doesn't diminish its merits as an excellent film. One of the best aspects of the movie is Henry Mancini's wonderful score. Click here to listen
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Diamonds Are Forever 40th Year Anniversary Retrospective

It is, some say, a Roger Moore Bond movie without Roger Moore in it. That’s because Diamonds Are Forever — which celebrates its 40th anniversary this week — is as camp as Glastonbury in June.

Camp? Yes. Camp. Look at the evidence: it has saucy innuendo galore (“You seem to have caught me with more than my hands up”); a Shirley Bassey-delivered title track with Don Black’s ‘ooh-er’ lyrics; a gaudy Las Vegas setting; gay hit men; a moon buggy chase; plus Ernst Stavro Blofeld holding the world to ransom with an outer-space death ray. You know. That kind of camp.

It might have been different had George Lazenby returned for a second bite at Bond, or if American actor John Gavin (from Psycho) had played 007. In fact, Gavin had already signed a contract but, at the last minute, due to studio jitters, Sean Connery was made an offer
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Their Best Role: Sean Connery

Their Best Role: Sean Connery
The iconic film character that immediately comes to mind when discussing Sean Connery is, of course, James Bond. He was the perfect Bond -- for most of us, the "real" Bond, whose testosterone-drenched shoes have never quite been filled by the parade of Lazenby, Moore, Dalton, Brosnan and Craig. Sir Ian Fleming may have created Bond in his novels, but Connery fleshed him out as a smart, sexy, self-aware creature of utter cool and confidence, and he set the bar quite high for those who followed.

But Connery's Bond films -- he made five, between 1962 and 1971, then returned for the "unofficial" Bond flick Never Say Never Again in 1983 -- are a small fraction of the films he's made in a career that's lasted for over five decades. In his 30s during the Bond years, Connery hit his stride as an actor (and, arguably, as a fully matured sex symbol) in
See full article at Cinematical »

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