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The Making of 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid' (1970)

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A behind-the-scenes look at the making of the classic western about the lives of two of America's most famous outlaws. Director George Roy Hill narrates this film, talking about some of the... See full summary »

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(as Robert L. Crawford)
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Title: The Making of 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid' (1970)

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Won 1 Primetime Emmy. See more awards »
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Himself - Narrated by
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Himself - Narrated by
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Himself - Narrated by
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Himself - Narrated by
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A behind-the-scenes look at the making of the classic western about the lives of two of America's most famous outlaws. Director George Roy Hill narrates this film, talking about some of the experience, both good and bad, of bringing the film to life. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

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Documentary | Short

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16 May 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Cómo se hizo 'Dos hombres y un destino'  »

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1.37 : 1
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This documentary is featured on the DVD of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) See more »

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User Reviews

 
And now for something completely different…
26 April 2005 | by (Luoyang, China) – See all my reviews

A few days ago I watched the making-of documentary about the Flight of the Phoenix remake and was surprised at how much profanity it contained. There were several times when Director John Moore would literally scream at the top of his lungs, unleashing streams of profanity at his cast and crew (mostly his crew, I think) about why there weren't doing this or why this happened or what went wrong with that scene or what the hell has that guy been doing while the plane has been flying overhead all this time?? After watching this documentary, I start to get the feeling that maybe film-making is just much more frustrating than I had previously thought!

On the other hand, one of the things that I've always found the most interesting when watching these documentaries is to hear stories about troubles and mishaps that they run into along the way and how those events altered the course of filming or even changed scenes within the movie itself, but evidently there are times when it's such a lengthy and difficult process that it can leave people jaded and disillusioned when it's all over, even when the movie becomes an enduring classic.

I think this was made for some kind of TV show just after the film was released, because it was filmed before the movie was released, before anyone knew what an important film it would be. I found it a little odd that they would have made it at all, since DVDs (and the demand for supplemental documentaries) were in the distant future and it seemed that so many people had substantial doubts about how the movie would be received.

I am always a little put off by Making Of documentaries that spend too much time showing you footage of the movie that you just finished watching, and while this one does quite a bit of it, it doesn't do it in a way that is at all repetitive. There are interviews with Paul Newman and Robert Redford and Director George Roy Hill, but there is no video of the interviews, all we have is the audio, which is set over behind the scenes footage as well as scenes from the final film, in order to illustrate the points that were being made in the interviews.

I wish they would do that more often, because while I don't like to see lengthy montages from the finished films in these documentaries, I do like when they describe how they made certain scenes and what problems they ran into and why they did it this way or that way, and then show the finished scene so we can see what they're talking about.

And yes, that last line will certainly blow your hair back!


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