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The Complete Monterey Pop Festival

Criterion lavishes a major upgrade to its older box set celebrating the first major rock concert event, the ‘California Dreamin’ idyll that some say marked the beginning of the Summer of Love. Get ready to hear and see some history-making performances from Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, and The Who. Plus two more features and a bundle of ‘extra’ music sets . . . including Tiny Tim.

The Complete Monterey Pop Festival

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 167

1968 / Color / 1:33 flat / 79 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 12, 2017 / 69.95

Cinematography: James Desmond, Barry Feinstein, Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, Roger Murphy, D.A. Pennebaker

Film Editor: Nina Schulman

Original Music: The Animals, The Association, Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Byrds, Canned Heat, Country Joe and the Fish, Jimi Hendrix Experience, Al Kooper, Hugh Masekela, Jefferson Airplane, The Mamas and the Papas, Laura Nyro, Otis Redding, The Quicksilver Messenger Service,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Titanic,’ ‘Master and Commander’ Cinematographers Tapped for Asc Recognition

‘Titanic,’ ‘Master and Commander’ Cinematographers Tapped for Asc Recognition
The American Society of Cinematographers has announced this year’s honorees for special contributions to the art of cinematography. The outstanding achievement prizes will be presented at the 32nd annual Asc Awards on Feb. 17.

Oscar- and Asc Award-winning “Titanic” lenser Russell Carpenter will receive the organization’s lifetime achievement award. Carpenter’s recent work include’s Marvel’s “Ant-Man” and “xXx: Return of Xander Cage.”

Set for the Asc’s international award is Russell Boyd. Boyd won the Oscar for “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World,” for which he was also nominated by the Asc. A longtime collaborator of director Peter Weir, his other credits include “Picnic at Hanging Rock,” “Gallipoli,” and “The Way Back.”

Alan Caso will receive the career achievement in television award. He has been Emmy- and Asc-nominated for his work on TNT’s “Into the West” and “George Wallace,” as well as HBO’s “Six Feet Under.”

Finally,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Criterion Reflections – Episode 2 – Winter 1969 Part 2

Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Martin Kessler, Jordan Essoe, Doug McCambridge, Jason Beamish and Trevor Berrett to discuss six titles from the Winter of 1969: Jaromil Jires’s The Joke, Juraj Herz’s The Cremator, Wim Winders’s Silver City Revisited, Fellini: A Director’s Notebook, Luis Bunuel’s The Milky Way and Pierre Etaix’s Le Grand Amour.

Episode Time Markers: Introduction: 0:00:00 – 0:09:47 The Joke: 0:09:48 – 0:36:30 Silver City Revisited: 0:36:31 – 0:54:30 The Cremator: 0:54:31 – 1:17:
See full article at CriterionCast »

Movie Review: A late legend of documentary film spends his swan song with Americans In Transit

For those who believe that death represents a journey from one plane of existence to another, it will seem apropos that the final feature directed by the late and legendary documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles, made when he was nearly 90 years old, takes place entirely on a cross-country train. In Transit, on which Maysles collaborated with four other directors, can’t compare to the pioneering Direct Cinema docs he made with his brother, David (who died in 1987)—such classics as Salesman (1969), Gimme Shelter (1970), and Grey Gardens (1975). But it’s very much of a piece with Maysles’ lifelong commitment to capturing reality on the fly, offering a vivid cross-section of regular folks who all happen to be aboard the Empire Builder, an Amtrak train that makes a three-day journey between Chicago and the Pacific Northwest. The film’s ideal audience is people who, riding public transportation, would ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Remembering Anita Pallenberg, the Muse at the Center of The Rolling Stones’ Tumultuous Love Triangle

Remembering Anita Pallenberg, the Muse at the Center of The Rolling Stones’ Tumultuous Love Triangle
With the death of Anita Pallenberg , the world lost an icon of the Swinging Sixties. The Italian-German model became a fashion It Girl of the age and her friendship with Andy Warhol integrated her into the cutting edge art world. She appeared in cult movie classics including Candy (featuring Ringo Starr) and Jane Fonda’s Barbarella, but her most famous role is undoubtedly that of muse for the Rolling Stones. Her high-profile relationships with two of the band’s guitarists, Brian Jones and Keith Richards, made her an enduring part of the Stones’ mythology. It became one of rock ‘n
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2’ Cast and Director Curate a Mixtape with Their Favorite Songs — Listen

‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2’ Cast and Director Curate a Mixtape with Their Favorite Songs  — Listen
The cast of “Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2” graces the latest cover of Empire Magazine, ahead of the film’s May 5 release. Taking either their favorite song or a tune they would have liked to be included in the Marvel superhero film, Chris Pratt (Star-Lord), Zoe Saldana (Gamora), Kurt Russell (Ego), Elizabeth Debicki (Ayesha), Pom Klementieff (Mantis), Michael Rooker (Yondu), Dave Bautista (Drax), Sean Gunn (Rocket/Kraglin), Karen Gillan (Nebula) and director James Gunn curated a mixtape for the magazine, which can be found on Spotify. Listen to each song chosen by the cast and the director below.

Read More: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ Trailer: Kurt Russell and Baby Groot Highlight Action-Packed Clip

“Whiskey And You,” by Chris Stapleton – chosen by Pratt

“When I’m on the road, I tend to listen to songs that allow me to bask fully in my loneliness. When I want to dive headfirst into sorrow,
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Reflections – Monterey Pop (1968) – #168

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

Just as the Monterey International Pop Music Festival marked a pivotal and definitive turning point (in this case, upward) in the cultural ferment of the 1960s, so too the film document of that event, D.A. Pennebaker’s Monterey Pop, initiated a new way of capturing music and its performance for posterity. The weekend-long Festival, featuring mostly West Coast hippie rock and folk combos, with a few international surprises tossed into the mix, was like a meteor that streaked across the sky of an emerging new civilization, illuminating the landscape, brightening the eyes of its witnesses, summoning a potent mix of emotions: joy, euphoria, ecstasy, bewilderment, even dread. The cinematic document, a short film clocking in at just under 80 minutes, that confirmed all those conflicting, incredulous impressions is like the meteorite that survived its hard descent into the atmosphere – potently powerful
See full article at CriterionCast »

Sundance 2017 Women Directors: Meet Susan Froemke— “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman”

“Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman”

Susan Froemke is a four-time Emmy winner and non-fiction filmmaker with over thirty films to her credit, including Academy Award-nominated HBO documentary film “Lalee’s Kin,” “Grey Gardens,” and “Wagner’s Dream,” which had a U.S. theatrical run before airing on PBS. Froemke recently co-directed “Escape Fire: The Fight To Rescue American Healthcare.” She was formerly principal filmmaker at legendary Maysles Films more than two decades.

“Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” will premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival on January 20. The film is also directed by John Hoffman. Beth Aala co-directed.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Sf: This documentary tells the story of four men who become unlikely conservationists when they see the natural resources that have sustained their families for five generations become threatened and depleted.

Filmed on the majestic Rocky Mountain Front, the vast Great Plains of Kansas, and in the shining Gulf of Mexico waters, these men, who work the iconic landscapes, formed alliances with friend and foe to save their homeland. It’s a film that captures the enduring frontier spirit of America. It’s a film of hope.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Sf: I read a draft of Miriam Horn’s book, “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” and fell in love with her characters. These families, who are descendants of homesteaders, frontiersmen, and fishermen, have fascinating stories that told a history of the United States that I found intriguing.

What I love about making documentaries is that you get invited into people’s lives that are completely different from yours and I thought that by filming these people on these extraordinary landscapes, I might be able to reconnect with some of the great American values.

I wanted to ranch, farm, and fish. I also care deeply about conserving land. These men and their colleagues show how it’s possible for humans and nature to co-exist in beneficial ways. This inspired me and I wanted to bring that inspiration to a wider audience.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Sf: I’m hoping that people will have their faith renewed in the democratic process that built this nation. To see that change is possible, but it only comes when people come together and work for change.

The film shows men with true grit who found consensus within their communities to affect change but it took time — 30 years in some cases — and not giving up is the key.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Sf: Documentary filming on the Gulf of Mexico and on the Rocky Mountain Front was a challenge. These are unforgiving locations. In the Gulf, I shot with Thorsten Thielow who convinced me to let him bring the Movi, which would keep the water’s horizon level so the footage would be smooth and beautiful.

We filmed in a rough sea on a fishing trip — luckily no one got seasick — but it was hard to even keep standing at times. Despite this challenge, the footage looked terrific.

Beth Aala, our co-director, shot with Thielow with the Movi for the packing trip in Montana. They could only bring a very limited amount of gear on mules, as there were no vehicles allowed. It’s the very reason why that area is so stunning — time really stood still on those trails, looking exactly the same for generations.

It was a little bit of choreography to maneuver between the animals on a very narrow trail, alongside those steep canyons. Thielow had to ride backwards on horseback part of the way to get some of the shots you see in the film, which gave the Crary family a big laugh.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Sf: This is a film that we were developing together at The Public Good Projects, a non-profit focused on using media to enlighten audiences about some of our nation’s most complex problems, which John Hoffman was running before he came to Discovery.

We had commenced shooting in all three locations and had put together a sizzle reel. When John started speaking with Rich Ross about joining his team at Discovery, the fact that we had this film in early production was part of those conversations.

When Rich saw the sizzle, he decided that it was a perfect opportunity for Discovery to demonstrate its commitment to telling solution-oriented environmental stories.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Sundance?

Sf: For a documentary, I think having your film premiere at Sundance changes everything in the life of the film. The important national press is in attendance, programmers for the other film festivals see it with an enthusiastic audience, and most wonderfully, many of your documentary peers get a chance to screen it and spread the good word!

There is no way to underestimate the reach Sundance provides for a film. It’s the best birth a documentary can have.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Sf: The best advice I received when I was just starting out in film was to learn to edit first. If I could learn documentary editing, I’d also be learning how to direct because I would know what I needed to bring back into the edit room. I followed that advice and it’s been invaluable.

I feel lucky that I’ve never received any bad advice.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Sf: First, you need total support while filming so only work with crew members that show respect and are willing to collaborate equally.

Second, follow your intuition. Never doubt it!

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Sf: Some of my favorite women-directed films are

Lina Wertmüller’s “Swept Away,” Sofia Coppola’s “Lost in Translation,” and Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker,” because they are beautifully crafted works of art. But I’m going to write about “Gimme Shelter” and Charlotte Zwerin, who directed the film with David and Albert Maysles.

Zwerin’s name is almost never included when “Gimme Shelter” is written about, but she created the brilliant structure for the film and is responsible for the doc’s “film within the film” concept that’s realized by filming the Rolling Stones in the editing room long after the Altamont concert.

The Maysles Brothers always credited Zwerin as a director, but in the early 70's, it was never honored by the industry. So I want to give a shot out to one of the earliest documentary female directors and honor her work.

W&H: Have you seen opportunities for women filmmakers increase over the last year due to the increased attention paid to the issue? If someone asked you what you thought needed to be done to get women more opportunities to direct, what would be your answer?

Sf: We are fortunate in the documentary world: Women have always been at the forefront of nonfiction film making. It is a wonderful community and continues to thrive through changes in technology and societal issues.

Sundance 2017 Women Directors: Meet Susan Froemke— “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Jody Hill Talks Rolling Stones Horror Movie ‘Gimme Shelter’

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Jody Hill Talks Rolling Stones Horror Movie ‘Gimme Shelter’
The haunting Rolling Stones documentary “Gimme Shelter” helped close the book on the ’60s. Nearly a half-century later, writer/director Jody Hill argues that those terrors remain fresh.

Read More: Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

Legendary documentary filmmaking duo Albert and David Maysles, along with Charlotte Zwerin, captured the excess and fatal mishandling of the landmark Altamont Free Concert in December 1969. Following the Stones through their American tour and invitation to headline the fateful show, the film eventually embeds itself in the Altamont audience, looking on as a murder plays out beneath the band’s performance.

For our fourth installment in our “Movies That Inspire Me” conversation series, presented in partnership with FilmStruck, we spoke to Hill about how the film slowly unfolds from an impeccably made rock doc into something with a more sinister edge. Hill describes a film that,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Magic Box: The Films of Shirley Clarke V. 4

Milestone wraps up its ‘Project Shirley,’ an in-depth study of the independent director of The Connection and Portrait of Jason. Practically all of Shirley Clarke’s small and experimental films are here from the early 1950s forward, plus a wealth of biographical film.

The Magic Box: The films of Shirley Clarke, 1929-1987

Blu-ray

The Milestone Cinematheque

1929-1987 / B&W + Color

1:37 flat full frame / 502 min.

Street Date November 15, 2016 / 99.99

featuring Shirley Clarke

Produced by Dennis Doros & Amy Heller

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Some disc boutique companies license ready-made movie classics for home video, and some slap whatever odd-sourced items can be had into the Blu-ray format and call it a restoration. Although the general tide for quality releases is rising, only a few companies will invest time and effort in historically- and artistically- important films lacking an obvious commercial hook. Milestone Films has been consistent in its championing of abandoned ‘marginal’ films,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Good Girls Revolt’ Review: Don’t Expect a Revolution in Season 1, But a Powerful Story Does Emerge

  • Indiewire
‘Good Girls Revolt’ Review: Don’t Expect a Revolution in Season 1, But a Powerful Story Does Emerge
This fall, Amazon’s had a notable run of new series that really champion female voices — with Tig Notaro’s “One Mississippi,” Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s “Fleabag” and Season 3 of “Transparent,” these ostensible comedies have brought subtle depths to the streaming service, telling stories that you might not see on any conventional network.

Read More: ‘Mad Men’ Creator Matthew Weiner Returning to TV with New Anthology Series from Amazon and the Weinstein Company

Good Girls Revolt,” meanwhile, wouldn’t feel terribly out of place on a basic or premium cable network, but does still keep that feminine energy going. The period drama focuses on ambitious Patti (Genevieve Angelson), timid Cindy (Erin Darke) and conservative Jane (Anna Camp), who among other women working at news magazine “News of the Week,” serve as researchers, but often go well beyond their basic duties to help the male reporters on staff complete their assignments. For their hard work,
See full article at Indiewire »

Arthouse Audit: ‘Shin Godzilla’ Stomps Delicate Indies ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Christine’

  • Indiewire
Arthouse Audit: ‘Shin Godzilla’ Stomps Delicate Indies ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Christine’
The traditional fall season of award-season releases gets a late start on Friday with “Moonlight” (A24) and “The Handmaiden” (Magnolia) leading the way. It can’t come a moment too soon.

This weekend, top-quality films “Certain Women” (IFC), “Christine” (The Orchard), “Miss Hokusai” (Gkids) and “Aquarius” (Vitagraph) competed in limited openings. All nabbed good or better reviews. But none scored at the level likely to lead to the sort of wider response and multi-million grosses that normally come along regularly at this time of year.

The weakness can be seen among later-week grosses as films expand. There hasn’t been a breakout crossover release of any significance since “Hell or High Water” (Lionsgate), which is still grossing better than most recent releases.

Shin Godzilla” (Funimation) showed strength with a midweek opening in a mixed plan of bookings. Similar to “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week” (Abramorama), out-of- the-box distribution seems to be finding positive results.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Rolling Stones Announce Live Album and Concert Film of Their Historic Cuba Show, Havana Moon

  • PEOPLE.com
The Rolling Stones Announce Live Album and Concert Film of Their Historic Cuba Show, Havana Moon
On March 25th of this year, the Rolling Stones made history by playing a free concert for over half a million people in Havana, Cuba. In addition to the record-breaking crowd, the show was an important benchmark in the thawing relations between the embargoed Communist country and much of the Western world. Now the Stones are issuing a live album and concert film of the once-in-a-lifetime event. Dubbed Havana Moon , it's due out Nov. 11. and will be available as a DVD + 2Cd, Blu-ray + 2Cd, DVD + 3Lp, and as a special deluxe edition. The announcement was accompanied by a 30-second teaser,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Rolling Stones Announce Live Album and Concert Film of Their Historic Cuba Show, Havana Moon

  • PEOPLE.com
The Rolling Stones Announce Live Album and Concert Film of Their Historic Cuba Show, Havana Moon
On March 25th of this year, the Rolling Stones made history by playing a free concert for over half a million people in Havana, Cuba. In addition to the record-breaking crowd, the show was an important benchmark in the thawing relations between the embargoed Communist country and much of the Western world. Now the Stones are issuing a live album and concert film of the once-in-a-lifetime event. Dubbed Havana Moon , it's due out Nov. 11. and will be available as a DVD + 2Cd, Blu-ray + 2Cd, DVD + 3Lp, and as a special deluxe edition. The announcement was accompanied by a 30-second teaser,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

6 Times Hollywood Shook Up Criminal Justice Before ‘Making a Murderer’

  • The Wrap
6 Times Hollywood Shook Up Criminal Justice Before ‘Making a Murderer’
Making a Murderer” subject Brendan Dassey had his conviction overturned by a federal judge on Friday. But “Making a Murderer” is not the first time a film or documentary has been a factor in a major legal reversal of fortune. “Gimme Shelter” (1970) A documentary directed by the Maysles brothers, “Gimme Shelter” started out as a simple concert film about The Rolling Stones, but turned out to be essential documentation of the fights and violence that erupted at the Altamont Free Concert. “The Thin Blue Line” (1988) Errol Morris‘ documentary depicted Randall Dale Adams, a man serving life in prison for a murder.
See full article at The Wrap »

Masters of Cinema Cast – Episode 52 – Soul Power

We return with a look at Soul Power, enjoy!

From Masters of Cinema:

Soul Power is a vérité documentary – compiled entirely from footage shot in 1974 – of the astonishing back-to-Africa 3-day music festival “Zaire ‘74”. It was held in Kinshasa ahead of the biggest boxing event of all time: the Muhammad AliGeorge Foreman “Rumble in the Jungle”. Directed by Jeffrey Levy-Hinte, editor of Leon Gast’s Oscar®-winning (Best Documentary) When We Were Kings, and sourced from the same archival pool, Soul Power features a legendary line-up of African and African-diaspora musicians – all of whom are at the very peak of their creative powers.

Alongside Ali’s wit and wisdom – profoundly lyrical in its own right – vibrant street scenes of downtown Kinshasa, and “fly-on-the-wall” footage of the festival’s staging, rehearsals, and jams, the three nights of concerts (lensed by Albert Maysles and a host of other legendary cameramen) offer electrifying performances by James Brown,
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Rolling Stones in ‘C—sucker Blues’: a verité gas, gas, gas

The Rolling Stones in ‘C—sucker Blues’: a verité gas, gas, gas
There is hardly such thing as an underground movie anymore — except, perhaps, for the ones that have to go underground because they aren’t allowed to be shown. The rough, grainy, outlaw king of those is “C—sucker Blues.” Not because you can never see it, but because on the rare occasions when you can, it has acquired the aura of an unholy testament: the ultimate down and dirty peek behind the curtain of 1970s rock & roll excess. It’s the time capsule that keeps on giving because it’s still semi-buried.

In 1972, the Rolling Stones recruited photographer Robert Frank to shoot a fly-on-the-wall film of their up-and-coming U.S. tour after the release of “Exile on Main Street.” Frank had created the extraordinary cover art for “Exile,” that tawdry collage of photographs that merged the Stones in all their let-it-loose glory with an homage to the rootsy mysteries of Americana.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doc Corner: Mayles' In Transit is a Stunning Achievement

Glenn here. Each Tuesday we bring you reviews and features on documentaries from theatres, festivals, and on demand. This week we look at the final work of Albert Maysles, In Transit.

Last week we looked at Chantal Akerman's final film, and this week completely by accident I am reviewing another final film by another towering name in documentary filmmaking. In a career that includes Grey Gardens, Salesman, Gimme Shelter, and Monterey Pop, Albert Maysles has made many films that are considered among the greatest non-fiction titles ever made. And while last year’s glimpse into the life of aging fashion icon Iris Apfel, Iris, was billed as his last work, it is in fact this deeply searching piece of cinema verite made in collaboration with Lynn True, David Usui, Nelson Walker III, and Benjamin Wu that is his last work and an incredibly fitting one, too. It’s the
See full article at FilmExperience »

Top Women Cinematographers Reveal 7 Best Tips for Career Success

Top Women Cinematographers Reveal 7 Best Tips for Career Success
What does it take to succeed in a man’s world? A Los Angeles Film Festival panel of women cinematographers ivealed what it took to make it to the top of a competitive industry.

1. A shot of LSD. Cinema verite shooter Joan Churchill (“Last Days in Vietnam”) started out by recovering from an eight-hour acid trip, she admitted, to shoot some of the most iconic images from the Rolling Stones Altamont doc, “Gimme Shelter.” That led to the assignment of shooting the Louds in PBS’s “An American Family.” A documentary cameraperson, often working with a hand-held camera and natural light, has to have “people skills,” she said. “You have to be interested in your subjects.” When she moved to London, she couldn’t get work until she joined the Asc—and became its first woman member. Her membership card read: “Lady Cameraman.”

2. Read and reread the script. French-born Maryse Alberti
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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