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Il dio serpente (1970)

A beautiful Italian woman is told by her black friend about the Carribean love god Jambaya who appears in the form of the snake. By the end of the movie, Cassini has decided to give herself... See full summary »

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(story), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Paola
Beryl Cunningham ...
Stella
Sergio Tramonti ...
Bernard Lucas
Galeazzo Benti ...
(as Galeazzo Bentivoglio)
Arnoldo Palacios
Juana Sobreda
Claudio Trionfi
...
(as Evaristo Marquez)
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Storyline

A beautiful Italian woman is told by her black friend about the Carribean love god Jambaya who appears in the form of the snake. By the end of the movie, Cassini has decided to give herself to Jambaya while Cunningham departs with her white friend's ex-lover, establishing a neat symmetry between their respective fantasies of exoticism. Written by BCULT - Rome, Italy

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Plot Keywords:

female nudity | sex orgy | erotica | See All (3) »

Taglines:

Voodoo Sexual Rituals To The Equator!!!


Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

28 November 1970 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

The God Snake  »

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| (16 mm)

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Trivia

Italian censorship visa # 56183 delivered on 10-11-1970. See more »

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Politically incorrect, Italian-language fun
11 November 2007 | by See all my reviews

While vacationing in the Caribbean with her husband, a young Italian woman meets a female native(after she first spies on the woman having wild sex on a deserted beach). The two of them share in each other's culture, respectively going lingerie shopping and engaging in some frenzied, naked tribal dancing. Eventually they exchange lovers, except that her new black friend neglects to mention that HER "lover" is actually a fearsome snake god!

This one of the earliest example of a type of Italian film that might be called "black sexploitation". It shouldn't be confused with American "blacksploitation" because it's audience was no doubt mostly white and much more interested in various permutations of interracial sex (white men-black women, black men-white women, black women-white women) than they were in seeing bad-*ss urban black guys stick it to the man. These films may seem a little racist, not only in the strange thrill they seem to get from interracial sex, but in the way they inevitably equate black with primitive. In their defense though, these films are almost all about the more "primitive" blacks in unsettled areas of the Third World and are not supposed a comment on African Americans or European blacks.

This film is significantly more tame than most of these films like "Black Emanuelle" or the ones the likes of Joe D'Amato were making at the end of the 70's--i.e. "Papaya of the Caribbean" or the descriptively titled "Black Orgasm". It features the lovely Nadia Cassini, who of all the many, many beautiful Italian actresses from the the great golden era of Italian exploitation (aka the 1970's) is probably the one that has received the least English-language exposure. She played a villainess in Luigi Cozzi's ridiculous, no-budget "Star Wars" rip-off "Starcrash", but other that she was mostly famous for a string of low-budget Italian sex comedies that even I haven't seen. This movie isn't available in English right now, unfortunately, but, trust me, it doesn't matter all that much.

Recommended to anyone looking for some politically incorrect, Italian-language fun.


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