IMDb > Cromwell (1970)
Cromwell
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Cromwell (1970) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.9/10   3,016 votes »
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Up 55% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Ken Hughes (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Cromwell on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 September 1970 (France) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Disgusted with the policies of King Charles I, Oliver Cromwell plans to take his family to the New World... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 1 win & 4 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(5 articles)
DVD Review: "The House Across The Lake" (1954) From Hammer Films; UK Release
 (From CinemaRetro. 4 September 2014, 3:57 AM, PDT)

Mark Gatiss: off with his head!
 (From The Guardian - TV News. 21 October 2012, 4:00 PM, PDT)

Chuck Lands Timothy Dalton
 (From MovieWeb. 26 August 2010, 2:56 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
What happened to the warts? See more (80 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Richard Harris ... Oliver Cromwell

Alec Guinness ... King Charles I

Robert Morley ... The Earl of Manchester
Dorothy Tutin ... Queen Henrietta Maria

Frank Finlay ... John Carter

Timothy Dalton ... Prince Rupert
Patrick Wymark ... The Earl of Strafford
Patrick Magee ... Hugh Peters

Nigel Stock ... Sir Edward Hyde

Charles Gray ... The Earl of Essex

Michael Jayston ... Henry Ireton
Richard Cornish ... Oliver Cromwell II
Anna Cropper ... Ruth Carter

Michael Goodliffe ... Solicitor General

Jack Gwillim ... General Byron
Basil Henson ... Hacker
Patrick Holt ... Captain Lundsford
Stratford Johns ... President Bradshaw
Geoffrey Keen ... John Pym
Anthony May ... Richard Cromwell
Ian McCulloch ... John Hampden
Patrick O'Connell ... John Lilburne

John Paul ... General Digby
Bryan Pringle ... Trooper Hawkins
Llewellyn Rees ... The Speaker
Robin Stewart ... The Prince of Wales
Andre Van Gyseghem ... Archbishop Rinucinni
Zena Walker ... Mrs. Cromwell
John Welsh ... Bishop Juxon
Douglas Wilmer ... Thomas Fairfax
Anthony Kemp ... Henry Cromwell
Stacy Dorning ... Mary Cromwell

Mel Churcher ... Bridget Cromwell (as Melinda Churcher)
George Merritt ... William
Gerald Rowland ... Drummer Boy
Josephine Gillick ... Elizabeth Cromwell
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Peter Bennett ... (scenes deleted)
Tony Caunter ... (scenes deleted)
George A. Cooper ... (scenes deleted)
Harry Fielder ... Man in Parliament (uncredited)
John Forbes-Robertson ... Colonel Harrison (uncredited)
Edward Kemp ... (uncredited)
Nigel Kingsley ... Servant (uncredited)
Victor Maddern ... Executioner (uncredited)
Paul Tropea ... Boy Outside Parliament (uncredited)
Rosetta Tropea ... Girl Outside Parliament (uncredited)
Fred Wood ... Peasant (in church) (uncredited)

Directed by
Ken Hughes 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Ken Hughes  screenplay

Produced by
Irving Allen .... producer
Andrew Donally .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Frank Cordell 
 
Cinematography by
Geoffrey Unsworth 
 
Film Editing by
Bill Lenny 
 
Casting by
Maude Spector 
 
Production Design by
John Stoll 
 
Art Direction by
Herbert Westbrook 
 
Set Decoration by
Arthur Taksen 
 
Costume Design by
Vittorio Nino Novarese  (as Nino Novarese)
 
Makeup Department
Neville Smallwood .... makeup artist
Bobbie Smith .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Frank Bevis .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Miguel Gil .... assistant director
Harold F. Kress .... second unit director (as Harold Kress)
Ted Sturgis .... assistant director
Mike Higgins .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Roger Simons .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Gary White .... third assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
José Algueró .... assistant art director
Bill Dennison .... assistant art director
Julián Martín .... painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Alfred Cox .... sound editor
Jack Davies .... boom operator
Leslie Hammond .... sound recordist
Bob Jones .... sound recordist
Bill Taylor .... uncredited
 
Special Effects by
Bill Warrington .... special effects
 
Stunts
Gerry Crampton .... stunt supervisor
Nosher Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Wilkie Cooper .... director of photography: second unit
Maurice Gillett .... gaffer
Peter MacDonald .... camera operator (as Peter Macdonald)
Cedric James .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
John Wilson-Apperson .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Music Department
Frank Cordell .... conductor
 
Other crew
Geoff Freeman .... unit publicist (as Geoffrey Freeman)
Ronald Harwood .... script consultant
Patrick Isherwood .... assistant accountant
Antonio Sanz Ridruejo .... liaison: Spanish army
Maggie Unsworth .... continuity
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
Argentina:139 min | USA:139 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Mono (35 mm prints)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:G | Finland:K-12 | Finland:K-11 (re- rating: 2001) | France:U | Iceland:12 | Ireland:PG | Netherlands:14 (1970) | Peru:PT | Singapore:PG | UK:U (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1985) | USA:G | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Peter Bennett was cut out of this film.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Cromwell was not one of the Members of Parliament named for arrest in the King's warrant. Cromwell was not present in Parliament at the time the King and his troops entered the House of Commons.See more »
Quotes:
Sir Edward Hyde:I do confess that I have these many years given my allegiance to a man not worthy of the title King of England!See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in The 100 Greatest War Films (2005) (TV)See more »

FAQ

How historically accurate is this film?
Why does the film refer to the English Civil War when it encompasses the rest of the British Isles?
Why was this film so controversial in Ireland?
See more »
46 out of 50 people found the following review useful.
What happened to the warts?, 31 August 2006
Author: benbrae76

Being a lay student of these times I was naturally interested in this movie, and to a great extent I found it to be thoroughly enjoyable, but what happened to the Battle of Marston Moor? Was history wrong and the battle never fought? Cromwell was depicted as the over all commander of the New Model Army (i.e the "Roundheads") at the battle of Naseby. He wasn't, Sir Thomas Fairfax was. Cromwell was the commander of the cavalry.

The Civil War was not a conflict over religion, although it played it's part. It was about "the divine right of kings", against the governance of, by and for the people, i.e. Rex v Parliament. Divided loyalties and opinions were split right across the board.

The capital charges of treason brought against the king was, to my mind, not altogether trumped up, and had some validity. However it was of course a "show trial", and to bring it about the laws had to be changed rapidly. There was no edict at the time that allowed anyone to put a monarch on trial. Issac Dorislaus (a Dutch lawyer) came to the rescue of Parliament. He wrote an order that would enable it to set up the court. This order was based on an old Roman law which stated that a military body (in this case the Parliamentary forces) could legally overthrow a tyrant. Naturally Charles I did not agree, either to this law, or that he was a tyrant. He was still the King, still the Head of State, and as such, above the law. He could do as he wished, and was answerable only to God. For him it was an unfortunate way of looking at things.

The casting of this movie was extremely well thought out, but with one exception. Cromwell himself. I'm not criticising Richard Harris in any way. He played the role superbly, but Cromwell was a short stocky man, not tall and athletically built. Neither, I'm sure, did he have a Irish accent. Also he had some extremely noticeable warts on his face which Richard Harris did not. Had the make-up artists gone on vacation? To his credit Richard overcame this miscasting, and acquitted the characterisation of the brusque, complex, and religiously enigmatic Oliver Cromwell with great fervour and passion, and I doubt if anyone else could have done it any better.

On the subject of accents, I wonder whether or not the Scottish accent adopted by Alec Guinness was apt. As Charles I left Scotland at the age of 4, and lived in England until his death, surely he would have cultivated an English one? True he had a Scottish tutor, but I'm still left to wonder. Perhaps someone could set me right.

(Just as a byline, I find it curious that Richard Harris, being an Irishman, accepted the part. In the greater part of Ireland the very name of Oliver Cromwell is loathed and reviled, and for good reason, so it says much for Harris's devotion to the acting profession that he actually did.) Being a musician, I was highly amused at seeing (and hearing) bugles played on horseback during a 17th century battle, reminiscent of the US 7th cavalry. Such instruments weren't developed to such an advanced stage until late into the following century (the 18th).

As another reviewer has noted, Cromwell was certainly not one of the "Five Members" who were to be removed from the House and arrested. These were: John Pym, John Hampden, Denzil Holles, Sir Arthur Haselrig and William Strode. A sixth man, Lord Mandeville (the future Earl of Manchester) was also to be taken.

There are quite a few more historical mistakes and omissions on which other reviewers have remarked, and I don't intend to repeat them. But in defence of the producers it must be said that "The English Civil War" was a momentous stage in British, perhaps even world history, and to illustrate it all in a couple of hours is impossible. Much as Shakespeare, when writing "Henry V", managed on a small stage to capture the flavour of Agincourt and events leading up to it, so this production coped well with a similar task on film. Therefore if certain liberties were taken, and artistic licence used, I think they can, in this case, be excused. Should it have encouraged one student to scuttle towards the history books (or now websites), to learn more about the whole period, then I would say it was a job well done.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (80 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Cromwell (1970)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Great film NForest
The King's Meal---what did it consist of? farmerne
Alec Guiness was awesome as king but Cromwell sucked anyone agree? clasikrcomafia
Ironic Irishman. chunkychop
Did you like the music? anneandwalt-1
Clicking of shoes and boots clauded
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