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The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes
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The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes (1969) More at IMDbPro »

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The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes -- An electrical accident causes a student to become a genius.


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Joseph L. McEveety (written by)
View company contact information for The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
31 December 1969 (USA) See more »
Programmed for laughs! See more »
Some college students manage to persuade the town's big businessman, A. J. Arno, to donate a computer to their college... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
(13 articles)
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User Reviews:
Great fun in an era when Disney actually made family films that families could view See more (13 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Kurt Russell ... Dexter

Cesar Romero ... A.J. Arno

Joe Flynn ... Dean Higgins

William Schallert ... Professor Quigley
Alan Hewitt ... Dean Collingsgood
Richard Bakalyan ... Chillie Walsh
Debbie Paine ... Annie

Frank Webb ... Pete Oatzel

Michael McGreevey ... R. Schuyler

Jon Provost ... Bradley

Frank Welker ... Henry Fathington
Alexander Clarke ... Myles Miller

Bing Russell ... Angelo

Pat Harrington Jr. ... Moderator (as Pat Harrington)
Fabian Dean ... Little Mac
Fritz Feld ... Sigmund Van Dyke
Peter Renaday ... Lt. Hannah (as Pete Renoudet)
Hillyard Anderson ... J. Reedy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Leon Alton ... Collingsgood Associate (uncredited)

Ed Begley Jr. ... Student (uncredited)
Gail Bonney ... Winifrid - Dean's Secretary (uncredited)
Paul Bradley ... Collingsgood Associate (uncredited)

David Canary ... Mr. Walski (uncredited)
John Cliff ... Police Turnkey (uncredited)
Howard Culver ... Moderator (uncredited)
George DeNormand ... College of Knowledge Attendee (uncredited)
Peter Paul Eastman ... Party Guest (uncredited)
William Fawcett ... Dietes - College Regent (uncredited)
Robert Foulk ... Police Desk Sergeant (uncredited)
Bobby Gilbert ... Man Pushing Light (uncredited)
Duane Grey ... Police Detective at Raid (uncredited)
Myron Healey ... Police Detective (uncredited)
George Hoagland ... Crew Member (uncredited)
Jonathan Hole ... Scientist (uncredited)
Shep Houghton ... Casino Patron (uncredited)
Michael Jeffers ... Racetrack Patron (uncredited)
Kenner G. Kemp ... Extra (uncredited)

Heather Menzies-Urich ... (uncredited)
Byron Morrow ... Leonard - College Regent (uncredited)
Gregory Morton ... Dr. Rufus Schmidt (uncredited)
George N. Neise ... College of Knowledge Sponsor (uncredited)
Joe Phillips ... Police Officer (uncredited)
Murray Pollack ... Casino Patron (uncredited)
Judson Pratt ... Detective in Gambling Raid (uncredited)
Tony Regan ... Casino Patron (uncredited)
Bruce Rhodewalt ... Man with Umbrella (uncredited)
Leoda Richards ... Casino Patron (uncredited)
Victor Romito ... Casino Patron (uncredited)
Clark Ross ... Crew Member (uncredited)
Cosmo Sardo ... Croupier (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Man Seated in Control Room (uncredited)
Maida Severn ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Mabel Smaney ... Casino Patron (uncredited)
Olan Soule ... TV Reporter (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Waiter at Track (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Man in Suit Outside of Set (uncredited)

Directed by
Robert Butler 
Writing credits
Joseph L. McEveety (written by)

Produced by
Bill Anderson .... producer
Joseph L. McEveety .... associate producer
Original Music by
Robert F. Brunner 
Cinematography by
Frank V. Phillips (director of photography) (as Frank Phillips)
Film Editing by
Cotton Warburton 
Art Direction by
John B. Mansbridge 
Set Decoration by
Hal Gausman 
Emile Kuri 
Makeup Department
La Rue Matheron .... hair stylist
Robert J. Schiffer .... makeup artist
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Christopher Hibler .... assistant director
Arthur J. Vitarelli .... second unit director
Sound Department
Robert O. Cook .... sound supervisor
Dean Thomas .... sound mixer
Visual Effects by
Diane Wright .... digital asset manager remastering: Laser Pacific (uncredited)
Bob Bralver .... stunts (uncredited)
Dick Warlock .... stunt double: Kurt Russell (uncredited)
Dick Warlock .... stunts (uncredited)
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Chuck Keehne .... costumer
Emily Sundby .... costumer
Music Department
Evelyn Kennedy .... music editor
Walter Sheets .... orchestrator
Other crew
Alan Maley .... title designer
Crew verified as complete

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
91 min
Aspect Ratio:
1.75 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Did You Know?

The amount of money that A.J. Arno (Cesar Romero) annually donated to Medfield College was US $20,000.See more »
Factual errors: When the doctor, Dean Higgins and Prof. Quigley are looking into Dexter's eyes during the medical examination, they are using an otoscope (a device used to look into ears). The correct instrument should be an ophthalmoscope.See more »
Dean Higgins:Oh, you don't know him. You don't know him at all! The man is ruthless! He gets all that taxpayers' money, and still he's ruthless!See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Soldier (1998/I)See more »
The Computer Wore Tennis ShoesSee more »


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9 out of 17 people found the following review useful.
Great fun in an era when Disney actually made family films that families could view, 25 June 2008
Author: HobbitHole from Czech Republic

People who are putting down this film as not good enough to 'show it's face in the theater' are showing their extreme ignorance.

These movies were made for family audiences and rebroadcast on Walt Disney's television program which highlighted family oriented movies with cast members that even signed morals clauses that they wouldn't act up (see Lindsey Lohan, etc. in these days) and trash the Disney image as being a family movie business.

Early on Disney had just made shorts and TV shows. In the late fifties they started making full-length films like 'The Shaggy Dog' with Fred MacMurray. It was so successful, it started something. Fred MacMurray was asked to do more films.

The Absent-Minded Professor (remade later with Robin Williams in the lead role in 'Flubber') was one of the successful movies made by Disney that was then edited for their TV audience.

It not only spawned a sequel, "Son of Flubber", but many more family films and comedies that were designed to help people forget their problems, while at the same time the commercials advertised Disneyland.

Disney was ahead of his time in providing programming in what were essentially well-made advertisements for families to enjoy and be reminded about visiting Disneyland, his 'family fun park'.

This light-hearted, fun comedy featured Kurt Russell in the early days of computers (pre-internet)getting the computer's full knowledge into his head.

In the remake (with Kirk Cameron) they updated it to the Internet infiltrating the student's mind and a 'super-hacker' from the opposing school (who's dean ironically is past Disney star Dean Jones) who seeks to hack Cameron's brain and stop his 'brilliance'.

The first of the three films that revolve around Dexter Riley (Russell), the dean (Joe E. Flynn), and friends is also the best done, though the others are enjoyable too. ('Now You See Him, Now You Don't' and 'Strongest Man In the World' are part of this three movie series)

It also teaches the value of humility. Riley did nothing to gain his knowledge, yet he became proud of how smart he was. He had to learn humility and how to treat his friends if he wanted to keep them. Good lessons to learn.

The Disney television films were made for families and are much better than the stuff made today for 'families' including politically correct films, sexually explicit, nasty language and all the other things that supposedly makes them more 'modern'.

Disney TV temporarily stopped around 1975. They have made some films since then that were still family oriented, though people that followed Walt and then Roy Disney didn't have the same ideas about films and the value of good stories.

Enter the Michael Eisner era...remaking classics and making part 2 stories of classics that have no basis in classic books and WERE released direct to video or DVD. Even marginal animated hits got sequels made. Actual hits like Lion King, Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, got several (part 2 of Aladdin was a real turkey).

Several of the older Disney films were remade for a 'revived' TV program. The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes was one of the better attempts. I would say only a handful were watchable in their 'updated' form. They made kids have to act like adults while the adults act like kids (this might be a clever plot line in 'Freaky Friday', but when it enters into other stories, it's hard to make out who is supposed to be adult and who are kids.

No wonder kids today are forced to face problems beyond their years. They can't even escape it in the so-called 'escape films' on TV or in the movies these days (with rare exceptions).

It takes exceptions like Pirates of the Caribbean or The Chronicles of Narnia to remind Disney that people still like well-made escape films that are wholesome and uplifting for the whole family.

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