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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

12 items from 2014


Altman Review [Tiff 2014]

23 September 2014 10:03 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

The films of Robert Altman breathed a certain kind of freedom. Not the American type of “Freedom,” though his movies were always very American. It was an artistic freedom, on one hand – to say, do and tell what he wished – and, on the other, an ability to extend that liberty to the actors on screen. There’s a loose, unwieldy quality to most if not all of Altman’s pictures (they were mostly improvised) that made them stranger-than-fiction – above a mere “representation” of the real world into a sphere of uninterrupted reality. They were tapestries of human behaviour.

You don’t see that in today’s cinema, and when you do it’s not done with the same level of authenticity, maturity and precision (oh, what Boyhood should have gleaned from Short Cuts or even Brewster McCloud!). Too many movies – whether independently made or straight from the maws of Hollywood – usually obsess over technical slickness, »

- Parker Mott

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Chain Saw Massacre and Eaten Alive Actress Dead at 64

7 August 2014 7:11 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre’ actress Marilyn Burns dead at 64 The Texas Chain Saw Massacre actress Marilyn Burns, the one cast member who manages to survive Leatherface in Tobe Hooper’s low-budget 1974 horror cult classic, was found dead on Tuesday, August 4, 2014, at her home in the Houston area. According to her manager, "she was found unresponsive by a family member." The cause of death remains unclear. Burns (born on July 5, 1950, in Erie, Pennsylvania) was 64. The Houston-raised Marilyn Burns began appearing in films in the early ’70s. She had a bit part in Robert Altman’s Houston-filmed Brewster McCloud (1970), starring Bud Cort, Sally Kellerman, and Shelley Duvall, and was later cast in a supporting role in Sidney Lumet’s Austin-shot 1974 drama Lovin’ Molly; however, Burns was ultimately replaced by Susan Sarandon, reportedly remaining in the production as a stand-in for both Sarandon and Blythe Danner. Also in 1974, Marilyn Burns landed the »

- Andre Soares

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Marilyn Burns 1949-2014

6 August 2014 5:01 PM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

The actress Marilyn Burns, who made an indelible impression as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre's final girl in 1974, has died at her home in Austin, Texas. She was 65. The timing is particularly sad, since it coincides with the 4k re-release of Tobe Hooper's infamous horror classic. As a cheerleader for the film on the festival circuit in the decades since its gruelling production, she'll be a sorely missed part of the festivities.Burns was born in Pennsylvania, but grew up in Texas and remained there her whole life. Involved in amateur dramatics as a child, her first role on screen was a bit part in Robert Altman's Brewster McCloud in 1970: it was filming locally so she made sure she was involved. She almost worked on Sidney Lumet's Lovin' Molly too, but lost her role to Susan Sarandon.As a student Burns was a member of the »

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Marilyn Burns, Star of Texas Chainsaw Massacre Dead at 65

6 August 2014 7:41 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Fay Wray may get the prize as the best screamer in moviedom, but nobody’s screams seemed as intense and as real and as horrified as Marilyn Burns as Sally Hardesty, the ‘last girl’ from the original 1974 Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

If ever there was an actress in horror who will be immortalized for a single role, it’s gotta be Ms Burns. I just saw Texas Chainsaw Massacre in its new souped-up incarnation this past weekend when it was screened at The Hi-Pointe as part of Late Night Grindhouse and was still impressed at what an unnerving performance director Tobe Hooper coaxed from her for the film. Her post-chainsaw career was almost non-existent (Hooper’s follow-up Eaten Alive, the TV movie of Helter Skelter and a couple of cameos here and there were about it). I met her a few times on the horror con circuit and she was a »

- Tom Stockman

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Texas Chain Saw Actress Marilyn Burns Dies

6 August 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Marilyn Burns, best known for her role in The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, died on Tuesday, her manager confirmed to Entertainment Weekly. She was 65. "She was found unresponsive by a family member this morning in her Houston, Texas, area home. Her family asks for privacy at this time. Further details will be released later," her rep tells E! News. Burns, who was born in Pennsylvania and raised in Texas, began her acting career with a role in Robert Altman's Brewster McCloud while earning a drama degree at the University of Texas at Austin. After several small film roles, Burns »

- Anya Leon

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‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ Star Marilyn Burns Passes Away

6 August 2014 2:21 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

She was at the epicentre of one of the most intense and influential films of all time so it’s no shock that tributes have been pouring in from Texas Chainsaw aficionados for actress Marilyn Burns, who has died at the age of 65.  She was reportedly found at her home, located appropriately enough in the state that made her name.

Pennsylvania-born Burns had an illustrious start to her movie career in Robert Altman’s Brewster McCloud (1970) and continued working with innovative directors when Tobe Hooper cast her in her most infamous role – that of Sally Hardesty, who fell foul of the appalling Sawyer clan in the broiling Texas heat, becoming the only survivor of the ensuing mayhem. With a plot partially-derived from the Ed Gein murders, TCM made a huge impact with an almost documentary-style format.  It ushered in one of the icons of horror in Leatherface, the hulking, skin-wearing »

- Steve Palace

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'Texas Chain Saw Massacre' star Marilyn Burns dies at 65

5 August 2014 7:17 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Marilyn Burns, best known her role in the cult horror film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, died Tuesday at her home in Houston, her manager confirmed to EW. She was 65.

Born in Pennsylvania and raised in Texas, Burns pursued acting throughout her schooling and made her film debut in Robert Altman’s Brewster McCloud while pursing a drama degree at the University of Texas at Austin. She appeared in small parts in other projects, but her breakout wouldn’t come till she landed the role of unlucky teen Sally Hardesty in Tobe Hooper’s bloody 1974 hit The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, »

- Lindsey Bahr

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Marilyn Burns, Who Starred in ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre,’ Dies at 65

5 August 2014 7:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Marilyn Burns, one of the original “scream queens” who starred in Tobe Hooper’s original 1974 “Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” died Tuesday in Texas. She was 65 and was found dead in her home near Houston.

Texas Chainsaw” was her first lead role; in it she played teenager Sally Hardesty, who goes with her brother and friends to the cemetery where her grandfather is buried and ends up as the only survivor of an encounter with the insane family led by chainsaw-wielding Leatherface.

Burns was born in Erie, Penn., raised in Texas and had small parts in films including Robert Altman’s “Brewster McCloud” while she was still in high school, and George Roy Hill’s “The Great Waldo Pepper.”

But she was most known for horror films including Hooper’s 1977 “Eaten Alive,” about an insane hotel proprietor who feeds his guests to his pet alligator. Among her other films were “Kiss Daddy Goodbye” and “Future-Kill. »

- Variety Staff

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Marilyn Burns, Who Starred in ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre,’ Dies at 65

5 August 2014 7:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Marilyn Burns, one of the original “scream queens” who starred in Tobe Hooper’s original 1974 “Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” died Tuesday in Texas. She was 65 and was found dead in her home near Houston.

Texas Chainsaw” was her first lead role; in it she played teenager Sally Hardesty, who goes with her brother and friends to the cemetery where her grandfather is buried and ends up as the only survivor of an encounter with the insane family led by chainsaw-wielding Leatherface.

Burns was born in Erie, Penn., raised in Texas and had small parts in films including Robert Altman’s “Brewster McCloud” while she was still in high school, and George Roy Hill’s “The Great Waldo Pepper.”

But she was most known for horror films including Hooper’s 1977 “Eaten Alive,” about an insane hotel proprietor who feeds his guests to his pet alligator. Among her other films were “Kiss Daddy Goodbye” and “Future-Kill. »

- Variety Staff

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This Is the 'Midnight Cowboy' Legacy, From A to Z

23 May 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's a shock to go back and watch "Midnight Cowboy" 45 years after its debut (on May 25, 1969) and see how raw and otherworldly it looks. After all, the X-rated Best Picture Oscar-winner has been so thoroughly assimilated into American pop culture that even kiddie entertainments like the Muppets have copied from it.

The tale of the unlikely friendship between naïve Texas gigolo Joe Buck (Jon Voight) and frail Bronx con man Enrico "Ratso" Rizzo (Dustin Hoffman), "Midnight Cowboy" was initially considered so risqué that it's the only X-rated movie ever to win the Academy's top prize (though after it won, the ratings board reconsidered and gave the film an R). Still, the film featured two lead performances and a few individual scenes that were so iconic that homages (and parodies) have popped up virtually everywhere. (Most often imitated is the scene where Ratso, limping across a busy Manhattan street, is nearly »

- Gary Susman

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Hallucination Strip | Blu-Ray Review

29 April 2014 9:55 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Raro Video restores an odd obscurity with Hallucination Strip, the one and only film to be directed by Lucio Marcaccini. As one easily can see several minutes into the feature, his lack of subsequent films is for good reason. A handful of Italian actors in supporting roles are out shadowed by the curious presence of American actor Bud Cort in the lead role in this uneasy stew of police procedural and youth counter culture. Wildly uneven and amounting to what seems like a whole lot of nothing, those mildly curious might be moved to give it a look.

Massimo Monaldi (Cort) is a student involved in political protests, particularly on issues pertaining to the current state of the education system as a means to oppress Italy’s youth. But he’s also a good time guy, running with a pack of rebellious youths whose main interests usually have something to do with sex, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Altman’s Unsung ’70s

20 January 2014 1:50 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Director Robert Altman had his fair share of ups and downs. The oscillation between works widely lauded and those typically forgotten is prevalent throughout his exceptionally diverse career. This was — and still is — certainly the case with his 1970s output. This decade of remarkable work saw the release of now established classics like M*A*S*H, Nashville, and McCabe & Mrs. Miller, as well as a picture like 3 Women, which would gradually gain a cult following of sorts and subsequently be regarded as a quality movie despite its initial dismissal. But couched between and around these features are more electric and generally more unorthodox films. There are multiple titles from this, arguably Altman’s most creative of decades, that remain generally unheralded to all but his most ardent of admirers.

For Altman, the 1970s began with this disparity. The first year of the decade saw the release of M*A*S*H, »

- Jeremy Carr

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

12 items from 2014


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