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Pam Grier, the Foxy Siren of Blaxploitation, to be Honored at This Year’s St. Louis International Film Festival!

The one and only Pam Grier will be honored by Cinema St. Louis with a ‘Women in Film Award’ when she’s in town for this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. Pam’s iconic movie career began when she moved to Los Angeles in the late ‘60s from her native North Carolina at age 18. After a tiny role in Russ Meyer’s Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls (1970), she landed a job as a receptionist for American International Pictures where she was discovered by Jack Hill, an Aip director who cast her in a pair of women’s prison films: The Big Doll House (1971) and The Big Bird Cage (1972). Soon she was known as the “Queen of Blaxploitation” at a time when film roles for African-American women were, as Grier puts it, “practically invisible, or painfully stereotypical”.

Sliff, which runs Nov. 2nd-12th will kick off with
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Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94
Cinematographer Fred J. Koenekamp, who won an Oscar for “The Towering Inferno” and was also nominated for shooting “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream,” died May 31.

His daughter Kathy Guyitt and the American Society of Cinematographers confirmed his death.

Both “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream” were directed by Franklin J. Schaffner, for whom he also shot “Papillon” and later “Yes, Giorgio.”

His work included memorable films of the 1970s such as “Billy Jack,” “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls,” “Kansas City Bomber,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” and “The Amityville Horror.”

Koenekamp received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Asc in 2005.

He was born in Los Angeles, where his father, Hans F. Koenekamp, was a Hollywood cinematographer and special effects expert. After starting out as a film loader at Rko, he moved up through the ranks and eventually became director of photography for several seasons of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

A
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94
Cinematographer Fred J. Koenekamp, who won an Oscar for “The Towering Inferno” and was also nominated for shooting “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream,” died May 31.

His daughter Kathy Guyitt and the American Society of Cinematographers confirmed his death.

Both “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream” were directed by Franklin J. Schaffner, for whom he also shot “Papillon” and later “Yes, Giorgio.”

His work included memorable films of the 1970s such as “Billy Jack,” “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls,” “Kansas City Bomber,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” and “The Amityville Horror.”

Koenekamp received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Asc in 2005.

He was born in Los Angeles, where his father, Hans F. Koenekamp, was a Hollywood cinematographer and special effects expert. After starting out as a film loader at Rko, he moved up through the ranks and eventually became director of photography for several seasons of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

A memorial service will be held June 17 at
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Horror Highlights: 5 Nights Of Fear on Shout! Factory TV, Creepy Co. Pin, Horror Movie Night Podcast’s Fundraiser to Fight Als, Jasmine

Rabid, and Clive Barker's Nightbreed are just a couple of films in the lineup for Shout! Factory TV's 5 Nights of Fear. Prepare thyself. Also in today's Horror Highlights: a new Beistle Cat special edition pin from Creepy Co., details on Horror Movie Night podcast's fundraiser to raise money for FamilyStrong4ALS, and Jasmine release details.

Shout! Factory TV's Five Nights of Fear Details: Press Release: "Scream Factory™ is celebrating five years of fear with the special screening event 5 Nights of Fear airing on Shout! Factory TV. In celebration of the now-iconic horror brand’s fifth anniversary, Scream Factory will present nightly screenings of cult favorite films Nightbreed, Bad Moon, The Exorcist III, Hellhole, and Rabid. 5 Nights of Fear will air from Monday, June 12 through Friday, June 16 each evening at 10 p.m. Et/7 p.m. Pt at http://www.shoutfactorytv.com/, and on Pluto TV Channel 512.

On Monday, the terrifying celebration
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Re-enter The Void! The greatest 80s throwback horror movies you need to watch

Author: Sean Wilson

As if last year’s nostalgia-infused sensation Stranger Things didn’t make it clear enough, the world is currently going mad for all things eighties. Not the big hair or the shellsuits, mind – rather woozy synthpop, blood-rich neon and anything related to the heyday of creepy body horror.

With Jeremy Gillespie and Steven Kostanski’s splattery new gorefest The Void out now, one that gleefully mashes up loving homages to H.P. Lovecraft John Carpenter, David Cronenberg and more, here are the essential throwback horror movies that you need to watch in preparation.

The House of the Devil

Writer/director Ti West is at the forefront of recent revival horror and this deliciously slow-burning spooker remains one of his best. Drawing on the ‘Satanic panic’ craze that swept America during the eighties, it’s the unbearably suspenseful story of a young woman (Jocelin Donahue) whose babysitting job at a creaking,
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The Love Witch review – delicious retro horror

Anna Biller captures the colours, style and mores of the lurid 70s in this near-perfect pastiche

Stiletto-sharp and as precise as a stocking seam, Anna Biller’s terrific homage to campy 1960s and 70s sexploitation horror movies is a riot of synthetic hair and vampy overacting. Biller, who designed the costumes and sets as well as writing, directing, editing and producing, has immersed herself in the Beyond the Valley of the Dolls-meets-Hammer psychological-shocker aesthetic. Hers is a witty and playful approach, but as with her 2007 film Viva – a lascivious, early 70s B-movie take on the sexual revolution – Biller lovingly recreates the film-making of the era with a fan’s obsession to detail. As such, it reminded me of Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s giallo pastiche, Amer: both pictures are deliciously lurid but wholly serious in their appreciation of the genre they evoke.

Biller cites George Romero’s
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New UK trailer for ‘The Love Witch’

A transformative and exquisite creation by Anna Biller (who directed, produced, wrote, edited, scored and designed every aspect), The Love Witch is a gorgeous-looking tribute to 1960s/70s low-budget horrors, classic American soap operas, Technicolor melodramas and vintage sexploitation aesthetics is an affectionate masterful pastiche with a deft feminist bite.

Think Russ Meyer meets Douglas Sirk and Beyond the Valley of the Dolls via Charmed and Dynasty as lovelorn young witch Elaine (a stunning Samantha Robinson) uses spells and potions to bring her everlasting romantic happiness. Finally meeting her dream man, Elaine’s desperation to be loved drives her to the brink of insanity and murder.

Elaine, a beautiful young witch, is determined to find a man to love her. In her gothic Victorian apartment she makes spells and potions, and then picks up men and seduces them. However, her spells work too well, leaving her with a string of hapless victims.
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70s Rewind: Inserts, Place an X Over Its Heart

Richard Dreyfuss once starred in an X-rated film. Let that sink in for a moment. Placing that into proper context reminds us that the 1970s were a very different time. The MPAA film rating system became effective in the U.S. on November 1, 1968. Six months later, John Schlesinger's Midnight Cowboy received an X-rating, and less than a year later, became the first (and only) X-rated film to win the Academy Award as Best Picture. Russ Meyer's Beyond the Valley of the Dolls earned the X-rating for its release in June 1970, Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange received it upon its original release in the U.S. in February 1972, Ralph Bakshi's animated Fritz the Cat was tagged with an X in April 1972, and Bernardo...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Overlook: Rapture with parrots: The delirious world of Finland’s king of melodrama

In The Overlook, A.V. Club film critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky examines the misfits, underappreciated gems, and underseen classics of film history.

“How can you wear a white wedding dress over your filthy body?”

—The Cross Of Love

In the pantheon of unclassifiable filmmakers, there is a special place for Teuvo Tulio, Finland’s king of shameless melodrama. A fetishist, an outsider artist of 1940s and ’50s film, he was outrageous, incapable of subtlety, rising to a higher plane of camp—beyond Ken Russell, beyond Nicolas Cage doing an accent, beyond Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls. His films feature distorted, bug-eyed acting, sometimes petrified in ecstasy, equally redolent of silent cliffhanger serials and late-night infomercials; a camera style that deliriously scrambles silent Soviet and German cinema with smoky Hollywood glamour, while maintaining almost no continuity; plots that are as formulaic as they are insane. The paradox of Tulio is that
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CriterionCast Chronicles – Episode 8 – September 2016 Criterion Collection Line-up

In this episode of CriterionCast Chronicles, Ryan is joined by David Blakeslee, Scott Nye, and Keith Enright to discuss the Criterion Collection releases for September 2016.

This will be the last episode of Chronicles for 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Links to Criterion Night Train to Munich (1940) Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum (1939) Cat People (1942) Blood Simple (1984) Dekalog (1988) Valley of the Dolls (1967) Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970) Links to Amazon Night Train to Munich Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum Blood Simple Cat People Valley of the Dolls Beyond the Valley of the Dolls Dekalog Episode Credits Ryan Gallagher (Twitter / Website) David Blakeslee (Twitter / Website) Scott Nye (Twitter / Website) Keith Enright (Twitter / Website)
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Quentin Tarantino Reveals Project Concerning the Cinema of 1970

Quentin Tarantino‘s brand of fetishism — the non-foot kind, I mean — is, in some part, an exploration of the cinema on a genre-by-genre basis, and so his filmography has, to my mind, been missing a certain something without a documentary. While he’ll claim there are (maybe) only two features left in him, there’s a chance that one will take that path — or at least have a documentary-like reserve of research behind it.

The subject? 1970. No, not the cinema of the 1970s, a medium-specific topic that’s been covered as much as any, but 1970, a time Quentin Tarantino considers the takeover point for New Hollywood — and it’s fascinated him so much that he’s been poring over and pondering material for four years. So he revealed during a recent masterclass held at Lyon’s Lumière Festival, where the “work in progress” was given this noncommital classification: “Am I going to write a book?
See full article at The Film Stage »

Lumière Festival: Eight Things Quentin Tarantino Said About 1970 in the Movies

Lumière Festival: Eight Things Quentin Tarantino Said About 1970 in the Movies
Quentin Tarantino for the past four years has been delving deep into the year 1970 in the movies, as he’s been telling audiences at the Lumière Festival in Lyon, run by Cannes general delegate Thierry Fremaux. At the fest Tarantino is presenting a 15-feature retrospective titled “1970,” that includes “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “Love Story,” Russ Meyer’s “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls” and “Zabriskie Point.”

Here are eight things Tarantino said about that year to Fremaux when they took the stage in front of some 2,000 cheering French fans.

– How his passion for 1970 started

It started because I read the book Mark Harris wrote “Pictures at a Revolution” that takes place in 1967. That’s the year that chronicles the real emergence of New Hollywood. The point that he makes in the book is that by the end of 1967 New Hollywood had won, only they didn’t know it yet.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Quentin Tarantino Teases His 1970s Project, But What Is It?

Quentin Tarantino Teases His 1970s Project, But What Is It?
Quentin Tarantino, the beloved and often controversial filmmaker, held a masterclass at the Lumiere Festival in Lyon, France earlier today, where he teased his new project, which may or may not be an actual film. The filmmaker revealed that he has spent the past four years researching the films that came out during the year 1970, and how it represented a turning point in both American and worldwide cinema. While he wouldn't offer too many specifics, he did have this to say to the crowd, "testing out" this premise publicly for the first time.

"Am I going to write a book? Maybe. Is it going to be a six-part podcast? Maybe. A feature documentary? Maybe. I'm figuring it out."

Quentin Tarantino was joined by Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Fremaux at the Lumiere Festival, which primarily features retrospectives on restored classics and also obscure gems for others to discover. This year,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Quentin Tarantino on the ‘New Erotic Cinema’ That Never Fulfilled Its Promise

Quentin Tarantino on the ‘New Erotic Cinema’ That Never Fulfilled Its Promise
Lyon, France — Presenting Russ Meyer’s “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls,” part of his 1970 retrospective at Lyon’s Lumière Festival on Sunday, director Quentin Tarantino outlined a bizarre attempt, led by Fox, to take erotic cinema mainstream in 1970.

It is a story of multiple ironies, of an embarrassed establishment and a maverick vindicated over time. In other words, it is a story that Tarantino warms to.

He told it with relish to a large crowd at the Pathe Bellacour in Central Lyon, despite a screening time that coincided with that most sacred of French Sunday traditions: lunch.

“New Hollywood became the Hollywood” in 1970, Tarantino said – flanked by Cannes festival chief Thierry Fremaux, who translated – reprising one centerpiece idea behind his whole 1970 showcase.

“Old Hollywood, which had existed since the ’20s, was no more. If there is any movie that illustrates how Old Hollywood is no more,” Tarantino said, it
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Quentin Tarantino: ‘The Problem With Any Revolution Is Now The Revolutionaries Have to Govern’

Quentin Tarantino: ‘The Problem With Any Revolution Is Now The Revolutionaries Have to Govern’
Lyon, France — Greeted with a standing applause by the 5,000-strong audience at Lyon’s Lumière Festival, Quentin Tarantino took to the stage Saturday night to talk about 1970, an idea which he’s been kicking around for four years.

No, it’s not a movie project. It could be a book one day, or a symposium, Tarantino said. Right now, however, it’s the title of a film program of 15 Hollywood movies selected by Tarantino, all made in or around 1970, which screen this week at France’s Lumière Festival.

Tarantino provided the climax to a 90-minute festival opening gala show hosted by Lumiere Fest head Thierry Fremaux, mounting the stage for a 15-minute introduction to the first film in the retro, George Roy Hill’s “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,’ starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford, which opened the Lumière Festival Saturday night.

And Tarantino did so with his customary emphatic lapidary style,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Festival Lumiere Digs Deep Into Film History

Festival Lumiere Digs Deep Into Film History
One festival might be enough for most, but after wrapping up Cannes in late May, artistic director Thierry Frémaux goes straight to work on his other passion project, the Festival Lumière, organized under the aegis of the Institut Lumiere, which this year takes place Oct. 8-16.

Situated in Lyon, where the Lumière brothers shot their pioneering 1896 short “Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat,” the festival acts as a kind of extended version of the Cannes Classics sidebar, shining a spotlight on films from the recent and distant past, with a steady stream of current stars and filmmakers to front the behind-the-scenes work of archivists and historians.

Frémaux’s famous hospitality puts him in good standing here. Though only in its eighth edition, the Festival Lumière has already presented its main award, Le Prix Lumière, to a litany of star names, starting with Clint Eastwood in 2009 and followed by Milos Forman,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Off The Shelf – Episode 104 – New Blu-ray Releases for September 27th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of September 27th, 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Links to Amazon 7th Victim, The/Shadows in the Dark An American Werewolf in London Beyond the Valley of the Dolls Bill & Ted’s Most Excellent Collection Blood Diner Central Intelligence Chopping Mall Dekalog Guyver Highlander : 30th Anniversary Howard Lovecraft And The Frozen Kingdom Hunt for the Wilderpeople Isle of the Dead/Bedlam Kamikaze ’89 Leopard Man, The/Ghost Ship, The Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Milky Way Neon Demon Patterns The Shallows The Shape of Things to Come Slugs Two Films By Douglas Sirk Double Feature Valley of the Dolls Warcraft Credits Ryan Gallagher (Twitter / Website / Wish List) Brian Saur (Twitter / Website / Instagram / Wish List) Donate via PayPal
See full article at CriterionCast »

Great Job, Internet!: John Waters talks about his love for Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls

John Waters has never made any secret of his admiration and love for the films of Russ Meyer, the breast-obsessed auteur behind such berserk B-movie classics as Vixen, Mudhoney, and the immortal Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! Those exploitation classics had an enormous impact on Waters’ own sex-and-violence-drenched films, especially the early star vehicles for the cross-dressing Divine like Pink Flamingos and Mondo Trasho. When the Criterion Collection released its own edition of Meyer’s 1970 opus Beyond The Valley of The Dolls, Waters was more than happy to share his thoughts about both the movie and the music featured in it. Criterion is currently highlighting some excerpts from Waters’ interview on its website. Scripted by a young Roger Ebert, Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls was the film that was supposed to bring Meyer into the mainstream. Unlike his previous independent pictures, this was a major studio production bankrolled by ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Dekalog,’ ‘The Shallows,’ ‘The Neon Demon,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Dekalog (Krzysztof Kieślowski)

Despite passing away at the all-too-young age of 54, Krzysztof Kieślowski invoked a sense of humanity that even today’s greatest directors might need a lifetime to achieve. What would be his defining masterwork (if he didn’t make a number of films that could also easily fall under the definition), the 10-part Dekalog, has been restored thanks to Janus Films and is now available on The Criterion Collection after touring the country. Also including interviews with those involved and more,
See full article at The Film Stage »
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