IMDb > Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970)
Beyond the Valley of the Dolls
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Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.2/10   8,275 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 2% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Roger Ebert (screenplay)
Roger Ebert (story) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Beyond the Valley of the Dolls on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 June 1970 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The closer they get to the top - the nearer they get to the bottom See more »
Plot:
Three girls come to Hollywood to make it big, but find only sex, drugs and sleaze. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Loved it, except for the lousy ending. See more (141 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Dolly Read ... Kelly Mac Namara

Cynthia Myers ... Casey Anderson

Marcia McBroom ... Petronella Danforth

John Lazar ... Ronnie (Z-Man) Barzell (as John LaZar)

Michael Blodgett ... Lance Rocke
David Gurian ... Harris Allsworth

Edy Williams ... Ashley St. Ives
Erica Gavin ... Roxanne

Phyllis Davis ... Susan Lake

Harrison Page ... Emerson Thorne
Duncan McLeod ... Porter Hall

James Iglehart ... Randy Black (as Jim Iglehart)

Charles Napier ... Baxter Wolfe
Henry Rowland ... Otto

Princess Livingston ... Matron
Stan Ross ... Disciple

Lavelle Roby ... Vanessa
Angel Ray ... Girl-in-Tub
Veronica Ericson ... Blonde Date (as Veronica Erickson)

Haji ... Cat Woman
Karen Smith ... Red Head
Sebastian Brook ... Art Director

Bruce McBroom ... Photographer (as Bruce V. McBroom)
Ian Sander ... Boy-in-Tub
Koko Tani ... Assistant
Samantha Scott ... Cynthia
Tea Crawford ... Kathy Page
Heath Jobes ... Makeup Man
John Logan ... Escort
Susan Reed ... Fashion Model
Robin Bach ... Gay Boy
Ceil Cabot ... Mother
Mary Carroll ... Middle Aged Woman
Joseph Cellini ... Man - Flowered Pants
Jackie Cole ... First Woman

Frank Corsentino ... Hippie Boy
Mibb Curry ... White Haired Gentleman
Coleman Francis ... Rotund Drunk

Pam Grier ... Fourth Woman (as Pamela Grier)
T.J. Halligan ... Science Teacher
Rick Holmes ... Man with Glasses

Marshall Kent ... Dr. Downs
Michael Kriss ... Young Actor
Tim Laurie ... Second Gay Man

Bebe Louie ... Hippie Girl
Lillian Barb ... Nurse (as Lillian Martin)
Ashley Phillips ... Fashion Model
'Big Jack' Provan ... Father
Joyce Rees ... Marion Harrisburg
Christopher Riordan ... Gay Boy (as Chris Riordian)
Bert Santos ... Taxi Driver
George Stratton ... Third Gay Man
The Strawberry Alarm Clock ... Themselves
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Russ Meyer ... TV Cameraman (uncredited)

Garth Pillsbury ... Man with Newspaper (uncredited)
Gordon Wescourt ... Gordon - TV Interviewer (uncredited)

Dan White ... Dr. Scholl (uncredited)

Directed by
Russ Meyer 
 
Writing credits
Roger Ebert (screenplay)

Roger Ebert (story) and
Russ Meyer (story)

Produced by
Red Hershon .... associate producer
Eve Meyer .... associate producer
Russ Meyer .... producer
Charles Napier .... associate producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Stu Phillips 
 
Cinematography by
Fred J. Koenekamp (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Dann Cahn 
Dick Wormell 
 
Art Direction by
Arthur Lonergan 
Jack Martin Smith 
 
Set Decoration by
Stuart A. Reiss 
Walter M. Scott 
 
Costume Design by
David Hayes 
 
Makeup Department
William Buell .... makeup artist (as Bill Buell)
Edith Lindon .... hair stylist
Daniel C. Striepeke .... makeup supervisor (as Dan Striepeke)
John Chambers .... special makeup effects artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Norman A. Cook .... unit production manager (as Norman Cook)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
C.E. Dismukes .... assistant director
David S. Hall .... assistant director (as David Hall)
 
Art Department
Sidney H. Greenwood .... property master (as Syd Greenwood)
 
Sound Department
Don Minkler .... sound
Richard Overton .... sound
Don Hall .... supervising sound editor (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Jack Harmon .... special photographic effects
Greg C. Jensen .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Jack Harmon .... special photographic effects
 
Stunts
Larry Holt .... stunts (uncredited)
Bob Minor .... stunts (uncredited)
Paul Stader .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Lynn Carey .... vocal coordinator
Igo Kantor .... music supervisor
William Loose .... composer: additional music
Robert Simard .... music editor
Ethmer Roten .... musician: flute (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Chris Haynes .... driver (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Manny Diez .... assistant to producer
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
  • A&M Records  courtesy of ('The Sandpipers' appear)
  • De Graff  fashions by (as De Graff of California)

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
109 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Deluxe)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:R (re-rating) (1989) | Australia:RC (original rating) (1970-1989) | Canada:PA (Manitoba) | Canada:R (Nova Scotia/Ontario) | Canada:18+ (Quebec) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) (re-rating) | Chile:(Banned) (original rating) | Finland:K-18 (2004) | France:16 | Netherlands:16 | New Zealand:R18 (re-rating) (1996) | New Zealand:(Banned) (original rating) (1970-1996) | Singapore:R21 | Sweden:(Banned) | UK:X (cut) | UK:18 (2003) (re-rating) (uncut) | USA:NC-17 (certificate #30822) | USA:X (original rating) | West Germany:18
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Frequently touted as Pam Grier's film debut. She received an on-screen credit and a photo of her in a party scene was prominently featured in a 1970 Playboy layout on the film. Her role is very brief; she can't even be seen as an extra. Marcia McBroom was roommates with her at the time and got her a role when she was cast in the film.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Ronnie picks up an extension phone when Kelly is in the middle of dialing her friends for help. The phones used are 500 series Western Electric business phones. Because of the way rotary dial phones work, picking up an extension would prevent any phone on the same circuit from being able to dial.See more »
Quotes:
Ronnie (Z-Man) Barzell:You will drink the black sperm of my vengeance.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in It's a Haunted Happenin'! (2002) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Look Up At The BottomSee more »

FAQ

What did Mike Royko say went wrong with this film?
What's going on with Z-Man and his big reveal at the end?
What does this have to do with the original "Valley of the Dolls"?
See more »
34 out of 53 people found the following review useful.
Loved it, except for the lousy ending., 27 January 2001
Author: (spearsdws@aol.com) from Huntsville, AL

I don't know why I feel so compelled to write about this movie. I had seen "BVD" a couple of years back and recently rented it again. In one weekend, I watched it three times. I love the color, the music, the whiz-bang editing, the campy dramatics...it would be a true classic if not for one thing: the distasteful, disastrous ending. "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" is soft-core auteur Russ Meyer's drug-drenched, sex-soaked parody of "Valley of the Dolls," the film based on Jacqueline Susann's best-selling novel of the same name. Whereas "Valley of the Dolls" is unintentional camp, "BVD" is intentional camp. It lampoons the southern Californian "scene" in the late '60's by relating the adventures of the three members of a girl band who find fame and fortune in Hollywood. "Sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll" is the main theme here; the secondary theme is "voluptuous, scantily-clad starlets displaying miles of cleavage." (This is, after all, a Russ Meyer film!) Those discriminating viewers seeking insightful social commentary, three-dimensional characters, and plot twists that actually make sense had better look elsewhere. The plot concerns the previously mentioned trio of female rockers and their escapades in La-La Land. Pet, Kelly, Casey, and Harris, the band's manager (and Kelly's boyfriend) make it to Los Angeles after a two-minute montage of them groovily singing their way across the country. Kelly is reunited with her long-lost aunt who takes the girls to a wild, swingin' party at the home of Ronnie Barzell, a rock promoter; Barzell enthusiastically signs the band to a contract after they do an impromptu performance for his guests. All of this miraculously occurs within six hours of their arrival in L.A. (Screw schlepping around town submitting demo tapes; this is the way to become a rock star.) Having achieved overnight fame, our busty, lusty heroines then confront the Dark Side Of Success, finding themselves quickly entangled in various soap opera-ish sub-plots.

The Suff I Liked: The acting: good, not great, but great acting would only detract from a movie like this. As the three female leads, Dolly Read (Kelly), Cynthia Myers (Casey), and Marcia McBroom (Pet), are, if nothing else, energetic and certainly gorgeous to look at. No, they're not accomplished thespians, but then Russ Meyer chose his actresses more for their cup sizes than their emoting skills. The performances I particularly like are those of John LaZar as flamboyant Ronnie "Z-Man" Barzell, Phyllis Davis as Kelly's kindly Aunt Susan, and Edy Williams as, hilariously, oversexed porn star Ashley St. Ives. The music: some great, late-'60's style rock songs. Does anybody out there know if there is a soundtrack available? Meyer's visual flair: This is one of the most colorful, most visually frenetic films that I have ever seen. Meyer will perhaps be remembered more for his abilities as cinematographer and editor than as director. Almost every frame is jammed with vibrant, sharp color and the whole show zooms along at such a feverish pace that you're left breathless.

The Stuff I Didn't Like: As I said before, my problem with this movie is the ending. I won't give it away, except to say that it is repellent, gratuitously violent, and so dark and brutal as to be completely out of sync with the gaudy, campy scenes that precede it.

My suggestion - skip the last 15 minutes or so, and just enjoy the long, riotous bacchanal that comes before.

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