IMDb > "Night Gallery" (1969)
"Night Gallery"
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"Night Gallery" (1969) More at IMDbPro »TV series 1969-1973

Photos (See all 11 | slideshow) Videos (see all 18)
Night Gallery: Season 3: Episode 15 -- Blood memories surface when an anthropologist responds in kind to a captive gorilla's primeval hatred; A vignette about vampires (and those who hunt them) -- two men try to dispatch a vampire for all time.
Night Gallery: Season 3: Episode 14 -- A spurned plantation owner in the British West Indies enlists the power of voodoo to avenge himself against a romantic rival.
Night Gallery: Season 3: Episode 13 -- A young wife in a remote English country house finds herself in thrall to strange and insistent voices of the dead.
Night Gallery: Season 3: Episode 12 -- A dockside merchant ignores the warnings of his friends when he falls desperately in love with a wraith-like young woman.
Night Gallery: Season 3: Episode 11 -- A lonely alcoholic plots revenge against her ex-husband by calling on a reluctant ghost she finds in her attic.

Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   2,414 votes »
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Writer:
Rod Serling (teleplay) (3 episodes)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Night Gallery on IMDbPro.
Seasons:
1 | 2 | 3 | unknown
Release Date:
16 December 1970 (USA) See more »
Plot:
Host Rod Serling presents tales of horror illustrated in various paintings. Full summary »
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 win & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(114 articles)
User Reviews:
Creepy chills and grisly gems on display for your perusal... See more (41 total) »

Cast

 (Series Cast Summary - 1 of 61)

Rod Serling ... Himself - Host (49 episodes, 1969-1973)
(more)

Series Directed by
Jeannot Szwarc (19 episodes, 1970-1973)
Jeff Corey (9 episodes, 1970-1972)
Gene R. Kearney (8 episodes, 1971-1972)
John Badham (7 episodes, 1971-1973)
Jerrold Freedman (6 episodes, 1970-1971)
Jack Laird (6 episodes, 1971-1973)
John Meredyth Lucas (4 episodes, 1970-1972)
John Astin (3 episodes, 1970-1971)
William Hale (3 episodes, 1971)
Timothy Galfas (3 episodes, 1972-1973)
Steven Spielberg (2 episodes, 1969-1971)
Allen Reisner (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
Theodore J. Flicker (2 episodes, 1971)
Don Taylor (2 episodes, 1971)
Gerald Perry Finnerman (2 episodes, 1972-1973)
Boris Sagal (1 episode, 1969)
Barry Shear (1 episode, 1969)
 
Series Writing credits
Rod Serling (27 episodes, 1969-1973)
Jack Laird (16 episodes, 1971-1973)
Gene R. Kearney (11 episodes, 1971-1972)
Halsted Welles (6 episodes, 1971-1973)
Alvin Sapinsley (6 episodes, 1971-1972)
Hal Dresner (3 episodes, 1970-1972)
Gerald Sanford (3 episodes, 1971-1972)
August Derleth (3 episodes, 1971)
Robert M. Young (3 episodes, 1972)
Fritz Leiber Jr. (2 episodes, 1970-1972)
Douglas Heyes (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
Richard Matheson (2 episodes, 1971-1972)
Theodore J. Flicker (2 episodes, 1971)
H.P. Lovecraft (2 episodes, 1971)
Margaret St. Clair (2 episodes, 1971)
David Rayfiel (2 episodes, 1972-1973)
Kurt van Elting (2 episodes, 1972)
Stanford Whitmore (2 episodes, 1972)

Series Produced by
Jack Laird .... producer (38 episodes, 1970-1973)
Burt Astor .... associate producer (13 episodes, 1972-1973)
Anthony Redman .... associate producer (13 episodes, 1972-1973)
Herbert Wright .... associate producer (13 episodes, 1972-1973)
Stanley Shpetner .... producer (2 episodes, 1972)
John Badham .... associate producer (1 episode, 1969)
William Sackheim .... producer (1 episode, 1969)

Paul Freeman .... executive producer (unknown episodes)
 
Series Original Music by
Eddie Sauter (17 episodes, 1971-1973)
Paul Glass (14 episodes, 1971-1972)
Oliver Nelson (7 episodes, 1971-1972)
Robert Prince (5 episodes, 1970-1971)
Gil Melle (4 episodes, 1971-1972)
Robert Bain (2 episodes, 1971-1972)
John Lewis (2 episodes, 1971-1972)
 
Series Cinematography by
Gerald Perry Finnerman (14 episodes, 1972-1973)
Lionel Lindon (13 episodes, 1971-1972)
Leonard J. South (9 episodes, 1971-1973)
William Margulies (6 episodes, 1969-1971)
Lloyd Ahern (3 episodes, 1972-1973)
Charles Straumer (3 episodes, 1972)
Richard C. Glouner (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
 
Series Film Editing by
Larry Lester (19 episodes, 1971-1973)
David Rawlins (12 episodes, 1971-1973)
Jean Jacques Berthelot (10 episodes, 1970-1971)
Sam Vitale (9 episodes, 1971-1973)
Albert J.J. Zúñiga (4 episodes, 1972)
James Leicester (3 episodes, 1970-1971)
James Ballas (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
Bud Hoffman (2 episodes, 1971-1972)
 
Series Art Direction by
Joe Alves (42 episodes, 1970-1973)
Sydney Z. Litwack (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
Howard E. Johnson (1 episode, 1969)
 
Series Set Decoration by
John M. Dwyer (26 episodes, 1971-1973)
Chester Bayhi (17 episodes, 1971-1972)
Sal Blydenburgh (10 episodes, 1971-1973)
Charles S. Thompson (5 episodes, 1970-1971)
James M. Walters Sr. (3 episodes, 1971-1972)
Bert Allen (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
Jerry Miggins (2 episodes, 1970-1971)
 
Series Costume Design by
Grady Hunt (6 episodes, 1970-1971)
 
Series Makeup Department
Larry Germain .... hair stylist (7 episodes, 1969-1971)
Bud Westmore .... makeup artist (7 episodes, 1969-1971)
 
Series Production Management
Burt Astor .... unit manager (28 episodes, 1970-1973)
Ben Bishop .... unit manager (1 episode, 1969)
 
Series Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Ralph Sariego .... assistant director (20 episodes, 1970-1973)
Lester Wm. Berke .... assistant director (15 episodes, 1970-1973)
Steve Siporin .... second assistant director (10 episodes, 1971)
Jack Doran .... assistant director (5 episodes, 1970-1971)
Chuck Lowry .... assistant director (4 episodes, 1972-1973)
Brad H. Aronson .... assistant director (2 episodes, 1972)
Ralph Ferrin .... assistant director (1 episode, 1969)
Marty Hornstein .... assistant director (1 episode, 1969)
 
Series Art Department
Thomas J. Wright .... gallery paintings (36 episodes, 1970-1973)
Phil Bandierle .... gallery sculptures (30 episodes, 1971-1973)
Logan Elston .... gallery sculptures (22 episodes, 1971-1972)
 
Series Sound Department
David H. Moriarty .... sound engineer / sound (23 episodes, 1970-1973)
Roger A. Parish .... sound / sound engineer (18 episodes, 1971-1973)
James R. Alexander .... sound / sound engineer (7 episodes, 1971-1972)
Melvin M. Metcalfe Sr. .... sound engineer / sound (4 episodes, 1972-1973)
John R. Carter .... sound engineer / sound (3 episodes, 1972-1973)
 
Series Stunts
Julie Ann Johnson .... stunts (1 episode, 1969)
 
Series Camera and Electrical Department
Doug Mathias .... best boy: Electric (19 episodes, 1972)
 
Series Costume and Wardrobe Department
Bill Jobe .... costumes (34 episodes, 1971-1973)
 
Series Editorial Department
Richard Belding .... editorial supervisor (46 episodes, 1969-1973)
 
Series Music Department
Hal Mooney .... music supervisor (17 episodes, 1972-1973)
Gil Melle .... composer: theme music (15 episodes, 1970-1972)
 
Series Other crew
Wayne Fitzgerald .... title designer: main titles (44 episodes, 1970-1973)
Anthony Redman .... assistant to producer / production associate / ... (22 episodes, 1971-1972)
Gerald Sanford .... executive story consultant (15 episodes, 1971-1972)
Herbert Wright .... production associate (7 episodes, 1972)
Paul Freeman .... production executive (6 episodes, 1970-1971)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Rod Serling's Night Gallery" - USA
See more »
Runtime:
50 min (44 episodes)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The 1970-1971 television series, "Four-In-One" (1970), rotated four separate shows: "Night Gallery" (1969), "McCloud" (1970), "San Francisco International Airport" (1970) and "The Psychiatrist" (1970). Two were renewed for the 1971-1972 season with 'McCloud' becoming the most popular and longest running.See more »
Quotes:
Rod Serling:For those of you who've never met me, you might call me the under-nourished Alfred Hitchcock.See more »
Movie Connections:
Features This Island Earth (1955)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
21 out of 21 people found the following review useful.
Creepy chills and grisly gems on display for your perusal..., 27 May 2002
Author: Christopher T. Chase (cchase@onebox.com) from Arlington, VA.

Caught a few episodes of this once again, as part of a Memorial Day marathon on Encore's MYSTERY! Channel. In spite of the fact that it was mostly reviled by critics and not a few viewers, when it originally ran on NBC back in the early '70's, it now has garnered a cult following and I can definitely see why.

GALLERY in its own way, did for horror anthologies what TWILIGHT ZONE did for science fiction and fantasy. It's not as good as ZONE was in most respects, and I don't think that Rod Serling intended it to be. Free of the pressure of topping himself, which was something damn near impossible to do, GALLERY could be wildly uneven in the way the stories were featured, as it has been mentioned before, in terms of both quantity and quality. One story could take up an entire hour, while a half-hour tale could be accompanied by much shorter vignettes, some of them no more than LOVE, AMERICAN STYLE-quality blackouts, albeit it with endings that feature mayhem rather than marriage, though just as hokey.

A lot of the clothes, the special effects, the skewed photographic angles and lighting are positively outdated by today's standards, but that is a big part of the charm of revisiting a lot of the episodes, many which are all too familiar to the generation that grew up with GALLERY and its peer programs from this particular era.

Even more fascinating, however, is the chance to see movie and TV veterans rubbing elbows and sharing scenes with many "newbies," a lot of whom are established stars today, and the chance to see them cutting their teeth on '70's material is an interesting and sometimes enlightening experience. For example, one episode I viewed featured Kim Hunter, Harry Morgan and a very young Randy Quaid; another starred an up-and-coming actor named Bill Bixby, with Carol Lynley, Ned Glass and Donna Douglas (yes, as in "Ellie Mae Clampett," but without most of her corn-pone accent.)

Based on classic short stories by everyone from August Derleth and H.P. Lovecraft ("Pickman's Model"), to Charles Beaumont and Ray Bradbury, the adaptations varied in quality, but usually never suffered as much as the original stories. Even so, there were scripts, directing and acting that are still every bit as good as anything produced today, better even, since anthology shows such as this are in woefully short supply (though the revamped THE OUTER LIMITS is in reruns, and I've heard a new version of THE TWILIGHT ZONE is in the works.)

Case in point, is one of the episodes I saw in the marathon, called THE WAITING ROOM. From an original Rod Serling story, directed by one of the resident GALLERY helmers, Jeannot Szwarc, this was a masterfully dark Old West tale with a twist, and a Who's-Who of a cast that would put any character actor buff or fan of Western potboilers into High Noon Heaven: Steve Forrest, Buddy Ebsen, Lex Barker, Albert Salmi, Jim Davis and Gilbert Roland. This tale brought to mind a movie TNT did not so long ago called PURGATORY, but where that film needed ninety minutes, this episode delivered a similar punch in thirty.

Of course, there is the now-legendary work done in both the pilot movie and the series by some young, green, but talented kid with the unlikely last name of Spielberg, but if you should happen to catch this while channel-surfing, look beyond those prejudicial impressions, stop and give it a chance, especially if you haven't seen it in quite a while. There are plenty of misses that were made during GALLERY'S three-season run, but the hits, which can still leave trails of cranberry-sized goosebumps down the back of your spine, are definitely worth it. Don't believe me? Well, you'll know whether or not NIGHT GALLERY can still have an effect on you, if you still shudder when you read my closing sentence...

"...and the FEMALE LAYS EGGS...."

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