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Till Death Us Do Part (1968)

PG | | Comedy, War | 10 January 1969 (UK)
The film version of '""Till Death Do Us Part" (1965)'. tells the story of Alf Garnett and his family living through the London Blitz.

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Till Death Us Do Part (1965–1975)
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A working-class Cockney bigot with a biased and expirienced opinion of everything shares them bluntly and almost carelessly.

Stars: Warren Mitchell, Anthony Booth, Una Stubbs
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Based on the BBC television series, and a sequel to 'Till Death Us Do Part (1968)', it tells of the family relationship between Alf Garnett, his wife, daughter and son-in-law, all living in a council flat.

Director: Bob Kellett
Stars: Warren Mitchell, Dandy Nichols, Adrienne Posta
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Alf and Else are getting old, Rita's left home, Else's confined to a wheelchair. Alf must now do battle with the Social Security system.

Stars: Warren Mitchell, Carmel McSharry, Arthur English
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Charlie Tully and womanising Reggie Peek con two rich Italians out of £500,000 but during their flight out Charlie is arrested for coning an American and a dog. Reggie stores the money in a... See full summary »

Director: Cliff Owen
Stars: Dick Emery, Derren Nesbitt, Ronald Fraser
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Dandy Nichols ...
...
...
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Mike's Father
Bill Maynard ...
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Sergeant
Sam Kydd ...
Fred
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Valuation Officer
Ann Lancaster ...
Woman at Block of Flats
Michael Robbins ...
Pub Landlord (Fred)
Pat Coombs ...
Neighbour
Kate Williams ...
Sergeant's Girlfriend
...
Mike's Mother
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RAF officer at Tube Station
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Storyline

The film version of '""Till Death Do Us Part" (1965)'. tells the story of Alf Garnett and his family living through the London Blitz.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Yer never saw Alf like this before! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | War

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

10 January 1969 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Alf 'n' Family  »

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(Eastmancolor)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Edward Evans had two roles in the TV series Till Death Us do Part. See more »

Goofs

At the outbreak of WW2 Alf replaces the photo of Neville Chamberlain with one of Winston Churchill. The portrait of Churchill is a post-war one. See more »

Connections

Followed by The Thoughts of Chairman Alf (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

Knees Up, Mother Brown
(uncredited)
Written by Harris Weston and Bert Lee
Sung at the Victory Party
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User Reviews

 
"Innit marvellous!"
20 September 2001 | by (England) – See all my reviews

Alf Garnett is one of TV's finest - and most misunderstood - comedy creations. Alf's brought to life by socialist writer Johnny Speight and tremendous comic actor Warren Mitchell. Mitchell is Jewish, yet Garnett is a blistering satire of right-wing bigotry.

The film version of Till Death Do Us Part is superior to the misguided sequel In Sickness and in Health, though slightly behind the '65 TV original. The first half of the movie lacks the ethical counterpoint of his Labour-voting ("Randy Scouse git!") son-in-law, yet still scores with Mitchell's classic study of loud-mouth stupidity.

The joke is Alf himself, not his views, and seeing him denounce Hitler's fascism then, in almost the same breath, rally against "Eye-ties" and "coloureds" is a fine parody of small-minded ignorance. This is a man who gleefully cries, "get a bit of action now" at the outbreak of the Second World War. A man who proffers "Ugly, innit?" at the birth of his own daughter. On being told his daughter's mother-in-law goes to church every Sunday, he rants, "I said I was religious - I didn't say I was a bloody religious maniac!" Often it's the way he tells 'em. Other Alf philosophies include repressing student demonstrations with a plan to "bung that lot out to work at fourteen, same as they done in the old days". "Wasn't that bad," he says about Hitler, when deciding, with hindsight, that we should have joined forces with the Third Reich, "Had his faults."

Alf's the man who has an opinion on everything, no matter how ill informed, and regularly expresses it, preferably in a crowded pub, to anyone that will listen. Alf's only flexibility in his views is in having a photograph of Winston Churchill ready to take the place of Neville Chamberlain's when he resigns.

This form of satire takes risks and can be shocking - during the film Alf criticises the calibre of the Japanese after Hiroshima and insults the Pope. "The coon's got a sense o'humour" he declares of a young girl before collapsing in a drunken heap and plastering his daughter with beer at her wedding reception. A documentary on Mitchell's life saw him recount a tale of a man who approached him in the street, praising him for "having a go at them coons." Mitchell's response was "we were actually having a go at idiots like you." That said, while an elitist amusement, the fact that this material became such a mainstream hit means that real-life bigots will ultimately see it as a vindication of their views, making it questionable entertainment.

Working a half-hour sitcom into a feature-length narrative is inevitably hit and miss, though Speight must be praised for doing something new with the format rather than just crafting a triple-length episode. Where the series saw Alf tirading against 60s counterculture, the first half of the movie is a kind of pre-story, with Alf and Else in the middle of the blitz. The film's recreation of 40s England is well realised, even if editing in stock footage of aircraft disrupts the illusion somewhat. Direction by Norman Cohen is also often cleverer than you might expect for this type of material.

At the halfway mark we get a "nearly 20 years later" caption, taking us up to the present date and the series' timeline. A three-and-a-half-minute dream sequence in the final stages may seem like filler, but it was good enough for Chaplin in The Kid, so it gets by here. Maybe the problem with the central character is that Mitchell makes him so likeable in spite of himself. Some famous names offer support in the film - Brian Blessed, Bill Maynard, Geoffrey Hughes, Anthony Booth and Frank Thornton - but, other than Booth, none of them get much of a look in, this being Mitchell's film all the way.


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