MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 363 this week

Till Death Us Do Part (1969)

 -  Comedy  -  1969 (UK)
6.1
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.1/10 from 259 users  
Reviews: 9 user | 1 critic

The film version of '""Till Death Do Us Part" (1965)'. tells the story of Alf Garnett and his family living through the London Blitz.

Director:

Writer:

(original story and screenplay)
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 4468 titles
created 27 Oct 2011
 
a list of 82 titles
created 02 May 2012
 
list image
a list of 79 titles
created 10 months ago
 
a list of 191 titles
created 7 months ago
 
a list of 8427 titles
created 7 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Till Death Us Do Part (1969)

Till Death Us Do Part (1969) on IMDb 6.1/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Till Death Us Do Part.

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Dandy Nichols ...
Anthony Booth ...
...
Liam Redmond ...
Mike's Father
Bill Maynard ...
...
Sergeant
Sam Kydd ...
Fred
...
Valuation Officer
Ann Lancaster ...
Woman at Block of Flats
Michael Robbins ...
Pub Landlord (Fred)
Pat Coombs ...
Neighbour
Kate Williams ...
Sergeant's Girlfriend
Shelagh Fraser ...
Mike's Mother
John D. Collins ...
RAF officer at Tube Station
Edit

Storyline

The film version of '""Till Death Do Us Part" (1965)'. tells the story of Alf Garnett and his family living through the London Blitz.

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

With acknowledgment to Mr. John Lennon and his pioneering work in the field of display See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1969 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Till Death Us Do Part  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The theme tune is composed and sung by The Kinks but for legal reasons Ray Davies' vocals were replaced by Chas Mills. See more »

Goofs

At the outbreak of WW2 Alf replaces the photo of Neville Chamberlain with one of Winston Churchill. The portrait of Churchill is a post-war one. See more »

Connections

Follows Comedy Playhouse: Till Death Us Do Part (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

September Days
(uncredited)
Music by Wilfred Burns
Lyrics by Ross Hutchinson
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Excellent Social Commentary on a Thankfully Bygone Era
5 August 2006 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

I first saw this film, when it was originally released in 1969 at the ABC Edgware (now, a block of flats and a gym, very much in line with the film's partial theme of community break-up), but was somewhat disappointed because it didn't contain the original music nor - until three-quarters into the film, the original format - Alf, Else, their daughter Una Stubbs and Tony Booth as her husband the "scouse git". Now, 37 years on, I think differently. Although somewhat episodic, it beautifully captures a bygone era, with excellent footage of London during WW2, a good feel of the old East End, plus old-fashioned pub culture without the plastic fittings and lager and the traditional family all eating around the table. There is the quaint working class Tory ethos embodied by Alf, not quite, the not for the likes of us of The Ragged Trousered Philanthropist, rather the loyal, home-owning, small-minded bigotry of someone who perceives himself as a self-made man, who has not made quite as much as he thinks he deserves.

There are some lovely home-truths and vignettes within this setting: the £1,500 paid for the house (not a bad price in this day and age!), the mortgage from the Council and the scrimping and saving to pay it off. Dandy Nicholls as the "silly old moo" housewife ultimately wears the trousers and guides the household through. There is also pathos from Alf's 5 shilling contribution to the Church in the hope his two up, two down will not be demolished to make way for flats and ultimately bathos, as the family is forced to move to a high rise block in Essex, where community and the sense of community hardly exist.

No more, the chat with the neighbour while carrying out ablutions through the wall of the outside "bog", the sheets of newspaper, which, during the war-scenes, enabled Alf to wipe his posterior with Hitler's picture, long since gone. It is far closer to reality than the fluffy adverts with the dog and the loo-roll of the present day.

Hopefully, the old-fashioned racism depicted by Johnny Speight with his sharp ear for dialogue and knowledge of the area, dissipated throughout the '70's and '80's as even Alf-like characters got to admire national role models such as Trevor MacDonald and Lenny Henry.The World Cup footage, presumably from Goal, interspersed with Alf and son-in-law in the Wembley crowd, were more evocative than most of the four-yearly diatribes we get as the England team seek to emulate their predecessors, with higher expectations than the results could possibly justify.

It is very much Warren Mitchell's film, his performance stands in comparison with any of those in more critically acclaimed '60's films such as This Sporting Life or the Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. Norman Cohen, the director, deserves credit for this too.

All in all, a worthy and atmospheric social drama with, yes, a little comedy, which being what it is, contributes to a period piece, which has stood the test of time well.


10 of 12 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Theme Tune stuartfewtrell
Discuss Till Death Us Do Part (1969) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?