Dennis Potter's controversial reading of the life of Christ, with Jesus portrayed as a hearty, fiery, well-meaning carpenter who believes that people should try to love their enemies rather... See full summary »

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Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
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Bernard Hepton ...
...
Peter
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Godfrey Quigley ...
Roman Commander
Patricia Lawrence ...
Procla
Gawn Grainger ...
Andrew
Wendy Allnutt ...
Ruth
Clive Graham ...
Brian Spink ...
Zealot
Robin Chadwick ...
Young Officer
Godfrey James ...
First Soldier
Eric Mason ...
Second Soldier
Hugh Futcher ...
First Heckler
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Dennis Potter's controversial reading of the life of Christ, with Jesus portrayed as a hearty, fiery, well-meaning carpenter who believes that people should try to love their enemies rather than fight all the time, but who is racked by self doubt as to whether or not he is the popularly anticipated Messiah. Written by D.Giddings <darren.giddings@newcastle.ac.uk>

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Drama

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16 April 1969 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Referenced in The Passion: Films, Faith & Fury (2006) See more »

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A feral Jesus
20 May 2007 | by (Ireland) – See all my reviews

Who would have thought this carefully archived Son Of Man, brilliantly written by Dennis Potter and searingly played by Irish actor Colin Blakely, would make for the most compelling and moving portrayal of Jesus yet committed to film?

In an astonishing turn of events the camera is made a witness. The Sermon on the Mount is not delivered from a height - Blakely's Jesus walks among his listeners, pleads with them, harangues them, shouts and screams his message. He's often a brute of a man, sweating and swearing, at times beating his brains like wood for examples and metaphors that he might make fit. Blakely's performance is a great teacher, a fine carpenter, and not a Messiah in sight. His final plight becomes harrowing because Son Of Man is such a physical play, like the man himself addresses the cross - 'You should have stayed a tree, and I should have stayed a carpenter.'

I was never more sure of an actor turned carpenter.


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