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4 items from 2011


American Zoetrope: In a galaxy not from Hollywood …

17 November 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

If there had been no Zoetrope, the film studio founded by Francis Coppola and George Lucas in San Francisco in 1969, there would be no Star Wars, argues John Patterson

In April 1979, Francis Ford Coppola threw a characteristically grandiose bash to celebrate the completion of Apocalypse Now, the picture that had threatened to become his Waterloo. It was at the apogee of the 1970s Hollywood renaissance, whose directors were suspended in that delightfully rarified moment after their biggest blockbusters and before their flops – and they all had at least one gargantuan flop ahead of them.

Coppola, as usual, was ahead of the game, or so it seemed. Apocalypse Now's chequered production history had produced wild press rumours of directorial overindulgence, perhaps even of a full swandive into film-making insanity, and the film's subsequent lofty place in the cinematic firmament was then far from secure. The film historian Peter Biskind, in his book Easy Riders, »

- John Patterson

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Francis Ford Coppola Talks To Toronto At Tiff

14 September 2011 9:33 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Last Sunday, a sold-out audience awarded Francis Ford Coppola a standing ovation when he strolled into the 548-seat Cinema 1 at Tiff’s Bell Lightbox, the new multiplex at the center of the world’s largest film festival after Cannes. To the adoring audience, Coppola smiled warmly and cracked, “I’m very embarrassed I left my black shoes on the plane,” as he sat down at center stage in tan shoes and a dark suit with Tiff Festival Director Cameron Bailey.

This event was a rare 85-minute chat directly with his audience and enjoyed all the hype of a red-carpet premiere.  In fact, right after the talk Coppola unveiled his latest movie, Twixt, at a posh gala.  Though Twixt has been enduring harsh reviews, Coppola was jovial as he recounted doing a location scout in Turkey and drinking one night in Istanbul.  “I fell asleep and had vivid dream.  I began »

- Allan Tong

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The five-albums test for movies

19 July 2011 4:30 PM, PDT | ifc.com | See recent IFC news »

At The Av Club, Steven Hyden wrote a really interesting piece today calling for a new measurement of excellence in the world of popular music. In addition to judging a band's "popularity" and "critical respectibility" he suggests you apply "the five-album test" to determine musical greatness. If an artist puts out five great albums in a row, they pass.

"Lots of artists have five or more classic albums (not including EPs or live records), but the ability to string them together back-to-back means being in the kind of zone that's normally associated with dominant college women's basketball dynasties."

It's a really fun test to apply to music -- The Replacements make the cut but The Rolling Stones don't -- which made me think that it would be equally fun to apply it to film. The five-movies test, though, is arguably even harder to pass than the five-albums test.

Many of »

- Matt Singer

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Hot Rods & Droids: A George Lucas Profile (Part 1)

15 June 2011 12:06 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary filmmaker George Lucas in the first of a six part feature...

“I was as normal as you can get,” stated American filmmaker George Lucas when reflecting upon his childhood. “I wanted a car and hated school. I was a poor student. I lived for summer vacations and got into trouble a lot shooting out windows with my Bb gun.” The California native was not initially drawn to the medium which would bring him fame and fortune. “Modesto was a small town, and there were only a couple of theatres. When I went to the movies I really didn’t pay much attention. I was usually looking for girls or to goof off.” George Lucas, Senior owned a stationary store where he sold office supplies and equipment to support his son, three daughters, and frequently invalid wife. “He was conservative, and I’m very conservative, »

- flickeringmyth

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2015 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

4 items from 2011


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