7.4/10
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49 user 22 critic

Burn! (1969)

Queimada (original title)
GP | | Action, Drama | 21 October 1970 (USA)
The professional mercenary Sir William Walker instigates a slave revolt on the Caribbean island of Queimada in order to help improve the British sugar trade. Years later he is sent again to... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(story), (story) | 3 more credits »

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3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
José Dolores (as Evaristo Marquez)
...
Teddy Sanchez
...
Francesca
Valeria Ferran Wanani ...
Guarina
Giampiero Albertini ...
Henry Thompson
Carlo Palmucci ...
Jack
Norman Hill ...
Shelton
Thomas Lyons
Turam Quibo ...
Juanito (as Joseph P. Persaud)
Álvaro Medrano ...
Soldier (as Alvaro Medrano)
Alejandro Obregón ...
Engl. Major (as Alejandro Obregon)
Enrico Cesaretti
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Storyline

The professional mercenary Sir William Walker instigates a slave revolt on the Caribbean island of Queimada in order to help improve the British sugar trade. Years later he is sent again to deal with the same rebels that he built up because they have seized too much power that now threatens British sugar interests. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The man who sells war. The bloodier the battle - the higher the price. He's going to make a fortune on this one.

Genres:

Action | Drama

Certificate:

GP | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

| |

Release Date:

21 October 1970 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Burn!  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(restored) | (DVD edition)

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Evaristo Márquez, who played rebel leader José Dolores in the film, was not an actor, but rather a poor villager from San Basilio de Palenque, Colombia, whom director Gillo Pontecorvo discovered while scouting locations in that country. He convinced Dolores to star opposite Marlon Brando, though the studio had originally wanted Sidney Poitier. See more »

Goofs

Portugal never had any colonies in the Caribbean. Its only American colony, Brazil, has no coast in the Caribbean. See more »

Quotes

Sir William Walker: Gentlemen, let me ask you a question. Now, my metaphor may seem a trifle impertinent, but I think it's very much to the point. Which do you prefer - or should I say, which do you find more convenient - a wife, or one of these mulatto girls? No, no, please don't misunderstand: I am talking strictly in terms of economics. What is the cost of the product? What is the product yield? The product, in this case, being love - uh, purely physical love, since sentiments obviously play no part in ...
[...]
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Connections

Referenced in Scarface (1983) See more »

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User Reviews

"That's The Logic Of Profit, Isn't It?"
26 July 1999 | by See all my reviews

In the 1830's, the island of Quemada in the Antilles is a Portuguese colony - that is, until an English agent provocateur arrives and inspires the black slaves to rise and expel the colonial authorities. However, as is always the way with revolutions, a group of middle-class power brokers seizes political control and the people's aspirations are betrayed.

Ten years pass, and the sugar industry now requires peace and stability on Quemada. The continuing guerilla campaign by the dispossessed blacks is harming profits. The very same English adventurer is once more despatched to the island, this time to hunt down and eradicate the revolutionaries he created.

Marlon Brando plays Sir William Walker in his best Fletcher Christian English accent and a blonde wig with a life of its own. His is a thoughtful performance, putting across the complexity of the man, a character who is undoubtedly cynical and unscrupulous, but who is also an emotional man and something of a political philosopher. He is certainly effective at what he does.

The direction of Gillo Pontecorvo is somewhat erratic at times. There are points where the narrative is confused, and the gold robbery which drives the plot somehow got left on the cutting-room floor. Jose Dolores' rise to power is the most significant event in the story, but we see nothing of it. During the voodoo carnival, two of the participants are wearing 20th-century soccer shorts. The film's central pivot, the passage of ten years between Walker's two visits to the island, is handled very sketchily by means of a few incongruous London scenes and a voice-over narration.

But there are good things, too. When Santiago's widow hauls her husband's body away, the masonry of the fort stands as a silent metaphor of colonial power - harsh, overbearing and sterile. Brando has some fine speeches, musing on the nature of political legitimism. The fire scenes are visually arresting (though it would have sufficed to have two or three guerillas being shot as they emerged from the burning sugar cane: seven or eight is labouring the point), and Walker is positively luminous against the tortured black shapes of the charred forest, showing in symbolic form that this man thrives on the suffering of the blacks, and that destruction is his natural element.


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