Dark satire in which the token black man on the executive board of an advertising firm is accidentally put in charge. Renaming the business "Truth and Soul, Inc.", he replaces the tight ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Robert Downey [a prince])

Writer:

(as Robert Downey [a prince])
Reviews

Watch Now

From $3.99 on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Chafed Elbows (1966)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A welfare recipient marries his mother.

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: George Morgan, Elsie Downey, Lawrence Wolf
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

Downey takes his camera and microphone onto the streets (and into some bedrooms) for a look at Manhattan's singles scene of the late sixties. Of course, that's not all: No More Excuses cuts... See full summary »

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Robert Downey Sr., Alan Abel, Lawrence Wolf
Comedy | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A parable based on the life of Christ. This ain't your father's Bible story, full of references about the destruction of the world through massive constipation and a New Mexican setting.

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Albert Henderson, Michael Sullivan, Luana Anders
Babo 73 (1964)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

Tribulations of a newly elected President.

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Taylor Mead, Jim Antonio, Tom Gaines
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

An experimental, ludicrous, plotless, absurd, surreal comedy. It is seemingly intentionally impossible to understand. It leaps from scene to scene, world to world, with recurring names and ... See full summary »

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Leonard Buschel, Elsie Downey, Michael Sullivan
Hugo Pool (1997)
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.1/10 X  

Hugo Pool is a quirky tale of a Los Angeles pool cleaner who falls in love with a young man dying of Lou Gerhig's Disease.

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Alyssa Milano, Mark Boone Junior, Malcolm McDowell
Walker (1987)
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

An unconventional retelling of the life of William Walker, a 19th century American mercenary leader who became the president of Nicaragua.

Director: Alex Cox
Stars: Ed Harris, Richard Masur, Rene Auberjonois
Secret Honor (1984)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A fictionalized former President Richard M. Nixon offers a solitary, stream-of-consciousness reflection on his life and political career - and the "true" reasons for the Watergate scandal and his resignation.

Director: Robert Altman
Stars: Philip Baker Hall
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

In an era when Dick, Jane, and discipline ruled America's schools, Albert Cullum allowed Shakespeare, Sophocles, and Shaw to reign in his fifth grade public school classroom. Through the ... See full summary »

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Albert Cullum
Nashville (1975)
Comedy | Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Over the course of a few hectic days, numerous interrelated people prepare for a political convention as secrets and lies are surfaced and revealed.

Director: Robert Altman
Stars: Keith Carradine, Karen Black, Ronee Blakley
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3.2/10 X  

A young woman arrives in New York to visit a friend and lands in one hot spot after another as she fends off the perverted advances from every man she meets.

Director: Robert Downey Sr.
Stars: Lawrence Wolf, Tom O'Horgan, Elmer Kline
Documentary | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A very in-depth documentary that follows the very over-worked director Paul Thomas Anderson through a gruelling 80+ days of shooting for the film Magnolia (1999). Very funny behind the ... See full summary »

Director: Mark Rance
Stars: Paul Thomas Anderson, Fiona Apple, William Arnold
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Stan Gottlieb ...
Nathan (as Stanley Gottlieb)
...
Elias, Jr.
Archie Russell ...
Joker
Ramon Gordon ...
Bissinger
Bert Lawrence ...
Hawker
Joe Madden ...
Mr. Syllables (as Joe Engler)
Arnold Johnson ...
Putney
David Kirk ...
Elias, Sr.
Don George ...
Mr. Cards
Buddy Butler ...
Putney's Bodyguard
Vincent Hamill ...
Man in White Suit
Tom Odachi ...
Wing Soney
Ching Yeh ...
Wing Soney, Jr.
Spunky-Funk Johnson ...
Mr. Major
Joe Fields ...
Pittsburgh Willie
Edit

Storyline

Dark satire in which the token black man on the executive board of an advertising firm is accidentally put in charge. Renaming the business "Truth and Soul, Inc.", he replaces the tight regime of monied white ad men with his militant brothers. Soon afterwards, however, the power that comes with its position takes its toll on Putney... Written by Doug Mosurak <marumaru@andrew.cmu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Don't rock the boat... sink it! See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 July 1969 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Budget:

$200,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (Eastmancolor)
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene where Putney and his wife are watching TV in the living room, they are watching one of Downey's previous films, Chafed Elbows (1966). See more »

Quotes

Myron X: Putney is confusing originality with obscenity.
See more »

Crazy Credits

As the credit for Robert Downey Sr. scrolls up the screen, the words "(a prince)" appear next to his name. See more »

Connections

Referenced in A Decade Under the Influence (2003) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
smart, sharp, cutting edge, and a big middle finger to the establishment, now as then
11 February 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

When someone refers to the independent cinema realm in the United States it's often inferred that it means the filmmaker or people behind the project had much more creative freedom and did what they wanted. This, today, is not really always the case unless someone is a solid "auteur" and creative freedom still comes with the caveat that one has to find distribution with one of the independent divisions of major studios or by getting picked up somehow for some kind of low-level deal at a worthwhile film festival. But Putney Swope, Robert Downey Sr's film about a tough-as-nails African-American accidentally promoted to head advertising guru at a production company, *is* independent cinema, the kind of work that went right along with the likes or Romero's Night of the Living Dead and Cassavetes Faces at the same time of getting no real typical studio distribution but causing waves, kicking ass and taking names in the cinema world. For all its moments that are rough and crude, it's unforgettable.

It's also a film that is funny, very and excruciatingly funny. Sometimes the sense of humor is just so ridiculous it's nearly impossible not to laugh, from the mere appearance of the President Mimeo with his wife to lines of dialog from the advertisements Swope's team puts together like "I can't eat an air conditioner" in a real "soul" voice. It is as smart as the audience it is aiming at, which is anyone with two brain cells to put together who can see that this work isn't offensive or *too* shocking because it's meant to rattle the cage, and it does this pretty well in the first five minutes. Once that's past Downey Sr goes on his blitz of sorts as far as being a filmmaker with nothing to lose: his protagonist is part Fidel Castro, part Isaac Hayes circa 1972 (and yes it's 1969 in the film) and part hard-assed ad exec with a firing streak to make Mr. Spacely on the Jetsons look kind. And don't forget those side characters, dear God.

There's so many memorable lines and moments that it's hard to keep track. From maybe the most hilarious botched assassination attempt in any movie to the one ad for "Face-Off" skin cream that includes lines that would give South Park a run for its dirty-mouth money, to just little asides with the one guy from Jack Hill's movies playing the Muslim who keeps giving lip to Swope and that one boy with the the nun who curses up a storm and impresses Swope in a swift stroke. It's a pretty direct message about media and advertising, but there's also a lot of powerful moments where it just hits the nail on the head about racism in America, sometimes without having to do more than a gesture and sometimes with doing something HUGE like having black panther types going this way and that around Swope's advertising regime. And for a low-budget production (I mean super low, hence the comparison to Night of the Living Dead and Faces) Downey got some really good actors, all non-union, and it's hard to imagine that some of them might have had their first time on camera here.

It should be mentioned that Downey's style doesn't make it perfect: it is crude and sometimes too crazy and dated for its own good, and I'm sure I didn't get some of the underlying humor of a couple of the ads since I'm from a full generation after these ads were aired (albeit the "Miss Redneck Jersey" was definitely not lost on me). In general though this is one of the finest of its time period, a satire that stings and a feature with a predominantly black cast that is all too knowing of what comes from an excess of power, regardless of skin color. It is, as someone might say, "good s***."


12 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Quotes GarrettW
I saw this movie in 69 MrSwoops
DVD or video? TheBrothersCarruthers
the poster matthew_kraus
President Mimeo drzwingle
Putney Swope Help tsampaamg
Discuss Putney Swope (1969) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?