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Paint Your Wagon (1969) Poster

Trivia

In her autobiography, Faye Dunaway mentions that she turned down the role of Elizabeth.
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Lee Marvin (Ben Rumson) drank real alcohol throughout the production, even though the director fought him about it. In most pictures the actors drink tea for whiskey and water for vodka. Marvin would only work if he got real liquor.
Lee Marvin was apparently drunk nearly every day of filming.
Jean Seberg's singing voice was dubbed by Anita Gordon, while Clint Eastwood and Lee Marvin did their own singing. Marvin's recording of the song "Wanderin' Star" went to #1 in the UK charts, earning him a gold record.
Lee Marvin was set to star in The Wild Bunch (1969), a project that he helped put together with stuntman Roy N. Sickner, when Paramount offered him $1 million plus a percentage to star in this picture.
Lee Marvin had to be made to look older in the movie, since at 44 he was only six years older than Clint Eastwood.
The original Broadway production of "Paint Your Wagon" opened at the Shubert Theater on November 12, 1951 and ran for 289 performances.
The song "Hand Me Down That Can of Beans" was performed by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, who were also extras in the movie. The band is most famous for singing "Mr. Bojangles".
Released at a time when musicals were rapidly going out of fashion, the film was notoriously over budget and behind schedule, opening to mostly negative reviews. It was not the huge box-office success that the producers had hoped it would be. Clint Eastwood's experiences on this film inspired him to form his own production company (Malpaso), saying that working on this picture had shown him how NOT to make a movie.
Only one number is sung by a trained singer - "They Call the Wind Maria" by Harve Presnell. (The word "Maria", spelled Maria without the H, is sung/pronounced as "Mariah".)
The play was produced on Broadway in 1951, and was one of the two properties Louis B. Mayer took with him after being ousted from MGM. Advancing age, and the fact that Mayer had been removed from actual film production for 30+ years, rendered him unable to get it underway as a film.
The character Horace Tabor is perhaps named for the well known 19th-century prospector Horace (Haw) Tabor (1830-1899), although the real-life Tabor was known primarily for silver prospecting.
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Clint Eastwood referred to the film as "Cat Ballou II".
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Clint Eastwood and Jean Seberg had an affair during filming in Baker County, Oregon, which drew the attention of tabloids - and Seberg's estranged husband, French director and novelist Romain Gary. He arrived on set planning to kill Eastwood, who fled into the woods. Jerry Pam, a publicist for both stars at the time, told Seberg biographer David Richards in 1981: "Once they got back to Paramount, it was as if Clint didn't know who she was. Jean couldn't believe that he could be that indifferent to her, after everything that had gone on in Baker. She was a very vulnerable woman, and it was a terrible trauma for her." At the same time Eastwood was having yet another affair with one of the film's extras. The extra (who wishes to be kept anonymous) told Seberg biographer Garry McGee in 2008: "We had an affair for two years. Since I was involved with Clint at the time, he pulled a few strings and got me work on the film." When asked if Seberg knew about Eastwood's other involvement, the woman said, "No. She had no idea." Eastwood kept mum on the subject for years, but in 2013 he uncharacteristically agreed to talk about Seberg for a French documentary. While the extent of their involvement was not discussed, Eastwood did admit: "I'd say she's important in my life, yes."
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George Maharis was a close contender for the role of Pardner.
The first attempt to film this property was by Louis B. Mayer and Jack Cummings in 1957. It was planned as a Cinerama release with a screenplay by John Lee Mahin and new songs by Alan Jay Lerner and Arthur Schwartz. The project was abandoned when Mayer died. Gary Cooper was being sought to play Ben Rumson.
The real name of the character "Pardner" is unknown to everyone until he is asked about it at the end of the film. This hints at Clint Eastwood'ss prior recurring role as "The Man With No Name" in Sergio Leone's "Dollars Trilogy," including A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965) and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966).
Lesley Ann Warren and Sally Ann Howes turned down the role of Elizabeth. Kim Novak was also approached, and Diana Rigg was set to star as Elizabeth, but was forced to withdraw due to illness.
This was the only film produced by Alan Jay Lerner.
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In a scene toward the very end of the movie, Clint Eastwood's character, Pardner, mentions his name is Sylvester Newel, "With one 'L'."
In the DVD version the 4'20'' intermission is kept in the film.
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Julie Andrews turned down the role of Elizabeth.
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Following The Sound of Music (1965)'s lead, Joshua Logan decided to shoot on location. He commissioned a huge mining town in the middle of Oregon's Cascade Mountains, which was painstakingly constructed over seven months. This caused the film to run wildly overbudget before filming even began. The location caused logistical nightmares: cast and crew slept in tents on location, constantly running low on filming supplies, food and other amenities. The stars were taken to and from the location by helicopter.
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In 1964 Eddie Fisher bought the rights from Louis B. Mayer. He planned for it to be a Cinerama production to commence that November.
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Initially, Joshua Logan wanted Mickey Rooney, James Cagney and Lesley Ann Warren for the leads. While not huge box office draws in 1969, they at least had musical experience. Which is more can be said for the actual stars.
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The shoot attracted local vagrants and hippies, who stole food and supplies from the set. Logan cast them as extras, though they refused his instructions to cut their hair or wear period clothing. Eventually the extras organized a makeshift union, demanding $25 a day payments and commissary bags full of food for fellow hippies. Joshua Logan, aggravated by an overlong shoot and lacking replacements, gave into their demands.
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Jean Seberg described Lee Marvin's singing as "like rain gurgling down a rusty pipe".
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Bing Crosby was the first choice for the Ben Rumson part.
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Joshua Logan wasn't impressed with Oregon's natural flora, importing pine trees from Hollywood to augment the local forest.
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Alan Jay Lerner micromanaged the production, overseeing filming and constantly countermanding Logan's decisions. This drove Joshua Logan, who suffered from bipolar disorder, to despair; he confided in film critic Rex Reed, "I don't know what the hell I'm doing here."
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Filming climaxed with Joshua Logan dynamiting the set, a fitting end to a long, painful shoot.
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Cameo 

Alan Jay Lerner: The producer/writer/lyricist is seen singing while standing on the log next to William O'Connell during the "There's a Coach Coming In" number.

Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

This film version bears little resemblance to the Broadway musical on which it is ostensibly based. After the success of several musical films in the 1960s, most notably The Sound of Music (1965), producers went looking for other projects to make, and "Paint Your Wagon" made the list. The original plot, about an inter-ethnic love story, was discarded as being too dated. The only elements retained from the original included the title, the gold rush setting and about half the songs. In the play, Elizabeth has a very minor role, Pardner does not even appear, and Ben Rumson dies at the end.

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