Night Gallery (1969–1973)
7.2/10
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Night Gallery (The Cemetery/Eyes/The Escape Route) 

A seemingly haunted painting drives a greedy man insane. A rich blind woman gets a new pair of eyes that allow her to see for only one brief ironic moment. An idyllic painting gives a Nazi war criminal in hiding some fleeting comfort.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Miss Claudia Menlo
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Osmund Portifoy
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SS-Gruppenführer Helmut Arndt / Josef Strobe
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Jeremy Evans
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Dr. Frank Heatherton
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Sidney Resnick
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William Hendricks
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Bleum
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Gretchen
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Carson
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1st Agent
Tom Basham ...
Gibbons
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George J. Packer
Garry Goodrow ...
Louis
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1st Nurse
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Storyline

In the pilot of the television series Night Gallery (1969), Rod Serling introduces three separate paintings, each with its own story of uncanny vengeance against evil to tell. The first, "The Cemetery", involves a black sheep nephew (Roddy McDowall) who murders his rich uncle to inherit his fortune - both much to the detriment of the uncle's butler (Ossie Davis) - only to find that vengeance extends beyond the grave. In the second story, "Eyes", a rich, heartless woman (Joan Crawford) who has been blind from birth blackmails an aspiring surgeon and a man who desperately needs money to give her a pair of eyes which will allow her to see for the first time - even though for only half a day's time - only to have the plan backfire on her in ways she never imagined. In the third story, "The Escape Route", a Nazi war criminal (Richard Kiley) is hiding from the authorities in South America, where he is confronted with his past demons and a curious Holocaust survivor (Sam Jaffe) and finds ... Written by Curly Q. Link

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Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

8 November 1969 (USA)  »

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4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bette Davis was the original choice to play Claudia Menlo (the role played by Joan Crawford), but she declined. See more »

Goofs

Sidney Resnick's eyes are transplanted into Claudia Menlo. In spite of the fact that Resnick's eyes are brown, Miss Menlo's eyes are still blue after the operation. See more »

Quotes

Rod Serling - Host: [Second segment narration] Objet d'art number two, a portrait. Its subject, Miss Claudia Menlo, a blind queen who reigns in a carpeted penthouse on Fifth Avenue. An imperious, predatory dowager who will soon find a darkness blacker than blindness. This is her story.
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Connections

Featured in The Siskel & Ebert Interviews (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Deutschlandlied
Music by Joseph Haydn
Lyrics by August Heinrich Hoffman von Fallersleben
Performed by Richard Kiley
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User Reviews

Crawford's Final Substantial Role
6 November 1999 | by (PA) – See all my reviews

This was Joan Crawford's second to last film (actually a TV movie) that was the pilot to the famous show created by Rod Sterling. There are three segments all which evolve around a painting and have very good morals. The first two are the best. Crawford's segment (the second) directed by Steven Spielberg (his directorial debut) is about a vicious, blind Park Avenue millionaire who undergoes an eye transplant just so she could see for a few hours, but everything does not go the way she plans. "Night Gallery" is a masterpiece, and I highly recommend it to anyone, especially Crawford fans or Twilight Zone fans.


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