IMDb > More (1969)

More (1969) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 13 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
6.6/10   1,273 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 42% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Paul Gégauff (screenplay) and
Barbet Schroeder (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for More on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 October 1969 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
When two people love, one always loves more.
Plot:
In the late 60's, after graduating in Mathematics, the German Stefan Brückner hitchhikes from Lübeck to Paris to see the world without money... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
on the failure of the hippies... featuring Pink Floyd! See more (28 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Mimsy Farmer ... Estelle Miller
Klaus Grünberg ... Stefan Brückner
Heinz Engelmann ... Dr. Ernesto Wolf
Michel Chanderli ... Charlie
Henry Wolf ... Henry
Louise Wink ... Cathy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Georges Montant ... Seller (uncredited)

Directed by
Barbet Schroeder 
 
Writing credits
Paul Gégauff (screenplay) and
Barbet Schroeder (screenplay)

Paul Gégauff (dialogue) and
Barbet Schroeder (dialogue)

Barbet Schroeder (original story)

Mimsy Farmer (collaborator: final version of the dialogue) and
Eugene Archer (collaborator: final version of the dialogue) and
Paul Gardner (collaborator: final version of the dialogue)

Produced by
Pierre Cottrell .... associate producer
Charles Lachman .... executive producer (as Charles R. Lachman)
David Lewis .... executive producer (as David L. Lewis)
Barbet Schroeder .... producer
 
Original Music by
David Gilmour  (as Dave Gilmore)
Nick Mason 
Pink Floyd  (as The Pink Floyd)
Roger Waters 
Richard Wright  (as Rick Wright)
 
Cinematography by
Néstor Almendros 
 
Film Editing by
Denise de Casabianca 
Rita Roland 
 
Art Direction by
Néstor Almendros  (as Nestor Almendros)
Fran Lewis 
 
Sound Department
Jack Jullian .... sound
Robert Pouret .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Robert Bernard .... electrician
Olivier Bogard .... assistant camera
Lester Waldman .... still photographer
 
Editorial Department
Monique Giraudy .... assistant editor
Madeleine Grimberg .... second assistant editor
 
Other crew
Alfred de Graff .... second assistant to producer (as Alfred de Graaff)
Carlos Durán .... assistant to producer (as Carlos Duran)
Janine Evrad .... script (as Janine Euvrard)
Monique Giraudy .... script
Fred Junck .... second assistant to producer
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
West Germany:117 min | USA:110 min
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The soundtrack was composed by Pink Floyd. The band was given £600 and complete ownership to all of the material for their work, and some of the songs on the album were still in their live set list by 1971. The band also scored the music for another Barbet Schroeder film, La vallée (1972) in 1972.See more »
Goofs:
Miscellaneous: David Gilmour's last name is misspelled "Gilmore" in the opening credits.See more »
Quotes:
Stefan Brückner:Well, I should go.
Estelle Miller:No, stay.
Stefan Brückner:Why?
Estelle Miller:I like to hear you talk.
See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
3 out of 3 people found the following review useful.
on the failure of the hippies... featuring Pink Floyd!, 5 March 2009
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States

I would be interested to hear from the director, Barbet Schroeder, as to why he decided to make More his first film, and more specifically what his interest in hippies- or rather this form of the Euro-hippie paradise- and about their demise. The film is, at least, true enough to keep one interested, but in its own kind of truth it's strange, biased. It's a given heroin (aka, "Horse") is awful stuff, rotten, the conclusion for many a dumb-headed drug user that sees that as the be-all-end-all, because it basically is: after that everything else stops, that becomes the life, and it's either a continuous run for more of the same or death. More starts off as something concerning a romance between a New York girl and a German man, but it becomes something else, for better or worse (sometimes both in the same scene).

It's basically about two "young" people, Estelle and Stefan, who meet in a city where Stefan has come as a sort of wanderer away from his home country. She's wandering too, sort of, and is maybe too friendly with a big-time pusher named Wolf. They end up on a remote island somewhere nearby and, after a somewhat daring grab for some "horse" by Estelle, they also find a pad in the form of a seemingly remoter house along the seashore. Schroeder's comment on youth and sex and drugs isn't too simplistic, which makes the film actually lucid and intelligent so many years later. It's both direct and subtle, more about the characters and then about the fact that what he's depicting could in other hands just be a propagandistic hippie-exploitation picture. Perhaps most pleasantly, and this is just a guess, Schroeder uses as inspiration the sort of long sequence from Bergman's Summer with Monika: two kids in an inexorable connection, some good some definitely not so good, set against (too?) perfectly shot landscapes.

On the one hand, I should mention that there are problems, some big ones in fact. The performances aren't very convincing throughout; a few scenes strike some power or have the actors in a good connection with one another, but Klaus Grumberg overplays himself even if he is an ornery German by nature (in that case I would've preferred Klaus Kinski in the part to make it crazier but deep enough for the subject matter) as does Farmer to her own degree. And there's gaps of naiveté in the screenplay that keep it from being as deep as it really thinks it is. On the other hand, there are two big things going for it: Nestor Almendros, the great cinematographer (i.e. Days of Heaven) is DP and is a big boost for a first time director like Schroeder. Nearly every image is seen with an awesome purpose or artistry, be it a shot of the cliffs by the sea or sun or something as simple as the seemingly natural light of a room.

The other thing is Pink Floyd, probably the main reason I and many others have heard of the film in the first place (years before I knew really who Schroeder was I saw the "More" soundtrack whenever I looked up Pink Floyd albums). It's very good music throughout, occasionally the mind-blowing variety that gives them the reputation they deserve. Some of it, too, is a little tedious, even as it is a movie that concerns free love and lots of drugs and sometimes both at the same time. I wouldn't rank it anywhere near as high as a Meddle or Animals, certainly not Dark Side, but it too helps to elevate the subject matter another notch, particularly when one least expects it or in low tones or floating in and out of buildings as Stefan or other walks on the streets. It's almost better atmosphere than the movie itself deserves, but overall More is still worth watching as a period piece- dated, but potent, like a less ambitious but more substantial Zabriskie Point.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (28 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for More (1969)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
drug mix sorelbaid
Nathan Fake - 'You Are Here' (Four Tet Remix) JobJobse
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
My Own Private Idaho The Science of Sleep The Basketball Diaries Candy Kings & Queen
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
IMDb Drama section IMDb West Germany section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.