7.4/10
3,018
52 user 68 critic

Medium Cool (1969)

R | | Drama | 1970 (Japan)
A TV news reporter finds himself becoming personally involved in the violence that erupts around the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

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2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Eileen
...
Gus
...
Ruth
Harold Blankenship ...
Harold
Charles Geary ...
Harold's Father
Sid McCoy ...
Frank Baker
Christine Bergstrom ...
Dede
William Sickingen ...
News Director
Robert McAndrew ...
Pennybaker
...
Social Worker
Beverly Younger ...
Rich Lady
Edward Croke ...
Plain-clothesman
Doug Kimball ...
Newscaster
...
Gun Clinic Manager
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Storyline

John Cassellis is the toughest TV-news reporter around. His area of interest is reporting about violence in the ghetto and racial tensions. But he discovers that his network helps the FBI by letting it look at his tapes to find suspects. When he protests, he is fired and goes to the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. Written by Mattias Thuresson

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Dateline: Chicago August '68 See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

1970 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

The Concrete Wilderness  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$800,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies. See more »

Quotes

Protesters: [chanting] The whole world is watching! The whole world is watching!
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Crazy Credits

In keeping with the film's documentary style, the cast is not listed during the opening credits, only in the ending credits. See more »


Soundtracks

Who Needs the Peace Corps?
(uncredited)
Written by Frank Zappa
Performed by Frank Zappa & The Mothers of Invention
Played in nightclub scene while the band The Litter is on screen
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User Reviews

 
a totally original pastiche
18 March 2009 | by See all my reviews

A rare directorial outing by all-time great cinematographer Wexler, this is generally acknowledged as the most politically radical film ever produced by a major studio. In freewheeling, semi-improvised, ideologically calculated scene after scene, it depicts an apolitical television cameraman's awakening of consciousness and abandonment of the role of passive observer. The class and race politics are four notches up on any comparable contemporary studio feature, that's for sure - with the surprisingly patient explanation of how 6-o-clock-news ideology oppresses minority communities, leading in to a love affair with a working-class single mother instead of some vanguard hippie, you could even argue that this Americanization of Godard has better ideological legs than the master himself. Sure it meanders a tad, and the stylistics can date, but there's nothing else in any movie ever that compares with the climax, as the actors make their way through actual documentary footage of the 1968 Democratic convention and attendant street battles. I mean, how did such a finely balanced mix of integrated narrative, Euro-tics, American underground film and straight-up documentary even occur to them? And how did they then manage to actually pull it off with honors? Pretty damned impressive.


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