Three American astronauts are stranded in space when their retros won't fire. Can they be rescued before their oxygen runs out?

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Charles Keith
...
Jim Pruett
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Ted Dougherty
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Clayton Stone
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Buzz Lloyd
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Celia Pruett
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Teresa Stone
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Betty Lloyd
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Public Affairs Officer
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Air Force Systems Director
Craig Huebing ...
Flight Director
John Carter ...
Flight Surgeon
Vincent Van Lynn ...
Aerospace Journalist
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Mission Director
Tom Stewart ...
Houston Cap Com
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Storyline

After spending several months in an orbiting lab, three astronauts prepare to return to earth only to find their rockets wont fire. After initially thinking they might have to abandon them in orbit, NASA decides to launch a daring rescue. Their plans are complicated by a hurricane headed towards the launch site and a shrinking air supply in the astronauts capsule. Written by KC Hunt <khunt@eng.morgan.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Saga of Ironman One See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 December 1969 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Space Travelers  »

Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$4,350,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(35 mm prints)| (70 mm prints)

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

MST3K did this movie under the title "Space Travelers". Of the over 200 movies the crew poked fun at, this contained substantially more stars and may be the biggest-budget movie they ever lampooned. See more »

Goofs

The astronauts are repeatedly shown releasing free-floating hand-held objects such as video cameras during their spacewalks. However, no loose untethered objects are ever allowed on spacewalks as the potential for them to float away and become hazardous objects is too great. See more »

Quotes

[Keith is pulled over by the Highway Patrol for speeding]
Charles Keith: Look, I've got to get to a telephone!
Texas DPS officer: Will you shut off your engine please?
Charles Keith: Officer, I'm Charles Keith, head of Manned Space!
Texas DPS officer: I know who you are. You have no brake lights. Your license is expired. You may be able to get to the moon, but mister you're a menace on the highway!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Wow, It's Cindy (1971) See more »

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User Reviews

Gut Check
31 March 2005 | by (Fly-Over Country) – See all my reviews

John Sturges' Marooned, based on the Martin Caidin novel, tells the story of three Apollo astronauts trapped in orbit when their main engine fails to fire, and the slow, agonizing realization that there's pretty much nothing that can be done for them.

Unless.

It's a slow movie, with Sturges taking his time (or his sweet time if you have no patience for this stuff) to build suspense and tension. Miles of film is expended detailing the boys at Mission Control and Kennedy trying to implement the "unless" I mentioned, a bold rescue mission that will arrive in the last moments of their O2, lifting off into the teeth of a hurricane, no less.

What makes the movie work are the very things that were lampooned so accurately by the boys at Mystery Science Theatre 3000, the terse acronym-filled jargon, the performances by Peck, Janssen, Crenna, Hackman, and Franciscus, and the glaringly non-CGI special effects (that looked great in 1970).

For a space-happy 11 year old, this was the ne plus ultra of movies--and the fact that the boys on the Apollo 13 had recently gotten back alive made Marooned more than a leetle beet unnerving in its topicality.

There's a moment that the movie transcends a clinical yawner, and takes on the mantle of heartbreakingly human drama. When the astronauts' wives are brought in to talk to them on small TV monitors, one after the other, and Nancy Kovack coldly tells the NASA suit "I know why we're here--we're here to say goodbye to them," you feel sucker-punched. It didn't seem real until right then.

Then the wives are warned that their husbands are "degraded," meaning they're tired, cold, and scared beyond description. Richard Crenna and Lee Grant have a touching exchange, the commander and his tough, beautiful, middle-aged wife trying to say everything to each other except goodbye. Kovack struggles with James Franciscus because her husband is the Spock of this mission, clinical and scientific. Yet he angrily assures her that they will make it. You can see him expending every bit of energy to convince her and himself that he's not a dead man orbiting.

Finally, Mariette Hartley tries to comfort Gene Hackman, who is bordering on hysteria and panic. She watches in a gut-wrenching horror as he reacts to her reading a letter the wives have written to the President. He cries and rages something like "I broke the lawn-mower, and I can't fix it and everyone is blaming me for it!" Hartley is hustled away, but she stops in dumb horror as she sees her husband on the big monitor in flight control, screaming "Don't kill me!" as Crenna and Franciscus hold him down to shoot him full of sedatives.

It's the most painful and human moment of the movie. Sturges has kept you on the edge of boredom, then wham, it's somehow all real. The movie goes from intellect to emotion in a matter of a few moments. I didn't appreciate this as an a tweenager, but God how my mouth went dry watching it a few days ago. These poor bastards are already in their titanium-shielded coffin!

The rest of the movie is predictable, but brutal in its denouement. You know that, if the men are to be saved, there's going to be some dues paid. I remember seeing Marooned at the Garland Theatre in Spokane in May, 1970. When those dues were paid, my mom was tearing up.

I thought, typical for a woman.

I was clearing my throat a lot and having trouble focusing on the screen when my family and I watched it over the weekend.

Adulthood has its upside, I guess.


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