Three American astronauts are stranded in space when their retros won't fire. Can they be rescued before their oxygen runs out?

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Charles Keith
...
Jim Pruett
...
Ted Dougherty
...
Clayton Stone
...
Buzz Lloyd
...
Celia Pruett
...
Teresa Stone
...
Betty Lloyd
...
Public Affairs Officer
...
Air Force Systems Director
Craig Huebing ...
Flight Director
John Carter ...
Flight Surgeon
Vincent Van Lynn ...
Aerospace Journalist
...
Mission Director
Tom Stewart ...
Houston Cap Com
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Storyline

After spending several months in an orbiting lab, three astronauts prepare to return to earth only to find their rockets wont fire. After initially thinking they might have to abandon them in orbit, NASA decides to launch a daring rescue. Their plans are complicated by a hurricane headed towards the launch site and a shrinking air supply in the astronauts capsule. Written by KC Hunt <khunt@eng.morgan.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Three marooned astronauts. Only 55 minutes left to rescue them. While the whole world watches and waits... See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 December 1969 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Space Travelers  »

Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$4,350,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(35 mm prints)| (70 mm prints)

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The space station using a spent Saturn S-IVB stage was based on early proposals during the Apollo Applications Program; at the time of filming, what came to fruition as Skylab was still under development. The only differences between the orbital workshop depicted in the film (which has a rocket motor attached) and the real Skylab was the incorporation of the Apollo Telescope Mount and two docking ports on the docking module, not to mention the absence of a rocket motor. The real Skylab was launched as a 'dry' workshop using a surplus Saturn V #SA-513 (originally earmarked for the canceled Apollo 18 mission). The three-man crew in the film spend 5 months living in space; the longest duration in the real Skylab was 84 days during the final mission, Skylab 4. See more »

Goofs

When Ironman One is undocking from the laboratory a maneuvering engine shown firing is one that would propel it towards the lab, not away from it. See more »

Quotes

Buzz Lloyd: [after being asked by Stone what he saw when a psychologist held up a blank sheet of paper during his astronaut acceptance boards] I saw a field covered with snow. And underneath was new oats. Then the snow melted and the field turned to green. But the psychologist said I was all wrong, it was just a blank sheet of paper.
Clayton Stone: He took you anyway?
Buzz Lloyd: Yeah, I guess they made a mistake.
Clayton Stone: No, no, they don't make mistakes.
Buzz Lloyd: That's right, I forgot. They don't make mistakes do they?
[...]
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Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: Fugitive Alien (1991) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Superb script and cast stand test of time
20 October 2002 | by (Houston, Texas) – See all my reviews

TiVo recorded this as a "suggestion" recently, and I realized that I

had never seen the film before. MAROONED was released in the

science fiction film dark age that stretched between 2001 and

STAR WARS, so I wasn't expecting much. In fact, MAROONED is a

gripping film from the beginning. The cast, headed by Gregory

Peck (geez, do we miss positive male authority figures like him!) is

uniformly outstanding. We get to see a young Gene Hackman,

years before his breakout in THE FRENCH CONNECTION, and

career-best performances from David Jansen, Mariette Hartley,

Richard Crenna, and James Franciscus.

The production values are first-rate, and the scenes set in NASA

facilities on the ground are the most realistic ever filmed, better

even than APOLLO 13. NASA apparatchiks sling around enough

acronyms to fill a family-sized box of Alpha Bits, and die-hard fans

of space travel won't be disappointed in the technical detail.

The pan & scan print I saw on Cinemax was superb; it looked

brand new. The sound was pretty much what one would expect in

an average flick from the late 1960s.

I have rated this film as an '8', a grade I rarely give. I would have

ranked it higher but for a draggy ending with cheesy EVA effects. I

still recommend this film highly, even for those with no particular

interest in space travel or science fiction. The dramatic core is

what drives this film, and there is no disappointment there.


37 of 51 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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