Lions Love (... and Lies) (1969) - News Poster

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A Critic’s Appreciation of Agnès Varda, New Wave’s Leading Lady

A Critic’s Appreciation of Agnès Varda, New Wave’s Leading Lady
In his book “The Judgment of Paris,” art historian Ross King points out that in the 1860s, France’s most esteemed artist was a man named Ernest Meissonier, a celebrated painter of horses and military tableaux whom few recall today. By contrast, many of the Impressionists whose genius we now celebrate were not properly recognized until after their deaths.

It’s a lesson worth remembering when thinking about contemporary cinema, in which pop entertainment earns instant praise, while the work most likely to endure a century from now a century from now goes relatively unrecognized in its time. French director Agnès Varda is the kind of filmmaker whose oeuvre is sure to stand the test of time — because it already has, holding up brilliantly since her 1955 feature debut, “La Pointe Courte,” about which Variety condescendingly wrote, “Main aspect of this film is that it was made for $20,000 by a 25-year-old girl.”

With her tiny seaside romance,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Agnès Varda to Receive Honorary Oscar

Agnès Varda shooting “Lions Love (and Lies…)”: PhotoFest

Agnès Varda is receiving a much-deserved Academy Award. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced via press release that the prolific director will be presented with the Honorary Award at this year’s Governors Awards. Also known as an Honorary Oscar, the award celebrates “extraordinary distinction in lifetime achievement, exceptional contributions to the state of motion picture arts and sciences, or for outstanding service to the Academy.”

Dubbed the “Mother of the French New Wave,” Varda “has experimented with all forms of filmmaking from shorts to documentaries to narrative feature films during her more than 60-year career,” the Academy details. Her first film, 1956’s “La Pointe Courte” is said to have kicked off the New Wave movement and her “Cleo from 5 to 7” is considered a “New Wave classic.” The Belgian filmmaker’s other best-known titles include “Le Bonheur,” “One Sings, the Other Doesn’t,” “Vagabond,” “Jacquot,” and “The Gleaners and I.”

The short film “Les 3 boutons,” docuseries “Agnes Varda: From Here to There,” and autobiographical doc “The Beaches of Agnès” are among Varda’s more recent credits.

Varda is the first and only woman to receive the Cannes Film Festival’s Honorary Palme d’Or. She took home the prize in 2015. She received the Locarno International Film Festival’s Golden Pard award, its lifetime achievement honor, in 2014. A series of Varda’s work screened at BAMcinématek earlier this year.

Faces Places,” Varda’s latest project, will screen at Tiff beginning September 13. The doc follows Varda and co-director Jr as they make their way through rural France, photographing and interviewing the people they encounter. “Faces Places” took home the Golden Eye (L’Oeil d’Or) prize at Cannes 2017.

The Governors Awards will be held November 11, 2017 in Los Angeles.

Agnès Varda to Receive Honorary Oscar was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Agnès Varda Film Series to Screen at BAMcinématek

Agnès Varda shooting “Lions Love (and Lies…)”: PhotoFest

Now is your chance to catch up on — or revisit — the works of Agnès Varda. Brooklyn’s BAMcinématek has announced an upcoming six-film series celebrating the acclaimed auteur’s work. Widely considered one of the most influential filmmakers in modern French cinema, Varda briefly located to California in the late-1960s and 80s. It’s this time period that the film series, titled “Varda in California,” commemorates.

“Varda has often derived inspiration from her surroundings,” a press release from BAMcinématek notes. “Soaking in the people, landscapes, and politics of Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay area, Varda created films that reflect life in America as only an outsider (she) could see it. Eschewing the ever-present specter of Hollywood, Varda instead became fascinated by the political and social movements roiling the state’s sunny demeanor.”

Films screening include 1980’s “Mur Murs,” a documentary about murals in La and the artists who created them, and 1981’s “Documenteur,” a work of autobiographical fiction that centers on a French mother and son’s search to find a home in La.

“Varda in California” runs from May 31 to June 13. Check out the full schedule and synopses of the films below, courtesy of BAMcinématek. For more information and tickets, head over to BAMcinématek’s site.

Wed, May 31

4:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

7pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

9:30pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

Thu, Jun 1

4:30pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

7pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

9:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

Fri, Jun 2

2pm: Model Shop4:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

7pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

9:30pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

Sat, Jun 3

2pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

4:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

7pm: Model Shop9:30pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

Sun, Jun 4

2pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

4:30pm: Model Shop

7pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

9:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

Mon, Jun 5

4:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

7pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

9:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

Tue, Jun 6

4:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

Wed, Jun 7

4:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

7pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

9:30pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

Thu, Jun 8

4:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

7pm: Model Shop

9:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

Fri, Jun 9

4:30pm: Model Shop

7pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

9:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

Sat, Jun 10

7pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

9:30pm: Model Shop

Sun, Jun 11

2pm: Model Shop

4:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

7pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

9:30pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

Mon, Jun 12

8pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

Tue, Jun 13

4:30pm: Documenteur + Uncle Yanco

7pm: Lions Love (…and Lies)

9:30pm: Mur Murs + Black Panthers

Film Descriptions

*All films play multiple times throughout the series.*All films directed by Agnès Varda unless otherwise noted.

Black Panthers (1968) An unapologetically radical dispatch from the front lines of the Black Powermovement: Varda profiles members of the Black Panther Party as they fight for the freedom of imprisonedactivist Huey P. Newton. Dcp. 30min.

Documenteur (1981) With Sabine Mamou, Mathieu Demy, Tom Taplin. This moving work of autobiographical fiction follows a young French woman in Los Angeles as she copes with a recent breakup and wanders the city in search of a home for her and her son. Aptly subtitled “An Emotion Picture,” the mysterious, serenely melancholic Documenteur captures Varda’s ambivalent feelings about America. Dcp. 65min.

Lions Love (. . . And Lies) (1969) With Viva, James Rado, Gerome Ragni. This irresistibly kooky time capsule takes a bevy of 60s counterculture luminaries — Warhol superstar Viva, the creators of Hair, and filmmaker Shirley Clarke — and throws them together in a luxe Hollywood home. Madness ensues, as they make prank calls, “try out” parenting with a bunch of borrowed children, and revel in the joys of free love. It’s a wildly funny perspective on the hippy-dippy oddity of La as seen by Varda. Dcp. 90min.

Model Shop (1969) Dir. Jacques Demy. With Anouk Aimée, Gary Lockwood, Alexandra Hay. Jacques Demy, along with his wife Varda, ventured to Hollywood for the one and only time in his career to make this tender, quintessentially La movie about the brief but momentous encounter between a failed architect (Lockwood) and a French erotica model (Aimée). It’s a gorgeous, pastel love letter to the “real” La — its sprawling freeways, parking lots, and seedy margins — far removed from the Dream Factory fantasy. Dcp.97min.

Mur Murs (1980) Varda takes her camera through the streets of late-70s Los Angeles to document the vibrant murals that cover the walls of the city and the artists who made them. Mur Murs is both an essential record of La’s street art and a lively celebration of the city’s diversity. Dcp. 80min.

Uncle Yanco (1967) Varda’s first American film — in which she journeys to meet a long lost bohemian relative living in Sausalito — is a freewheeling family affair that grooves on the good vibes of sun-kissed 60s California. Dcp. 18min.

Agnès Varda Film Series to Screen at BAMcinématek was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

DVD Savant 2015 Favored Disc Roundup

or, Savant picks The Most Impressive Discs of 2015

This is the actual view from Savant Central, looking due North.

What a year! I was able to take one very nice trip back East too see Washington D.C. for the first time, or at least as much as two days' walking in the hot sun and then cool rain would allow. Back home in Los Angeles, we've had a year of extreme drought -- my lawn is looking patriotically ratty -- and we're expecting something called El Niño, that's supposed to be just shy of Old-Testament build-me-an-ark intensity. We withstood heat waves like those in Day the Earth Caught Fire, and now we'll get the storms part. This has been a wild year for DVD Savant, which is still a little unsettled. DVDtalk has been very patient and generous, and so have Stuart Galbraith & Joe Dante; so far everything
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 34 – Agnès Varda in California

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this episode, David and Trevor discuss Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California.

About the films:

The legendary French filmmaker Agnès Varda, whose remarkable career began in the 1950s and has continued into the twenty-first century, produced some of her most provocative works in the United States. After temporarily relocating to California in the late sixties with her husband, Jacques Demy, Varda, inspired by the politics, youth culture, and sunshine of the San Francisco and Los Angeles areas, created three works that use documentary and fiction in various ways. She returned a decade later, and made two other fascinating portraits of outsiderness. Her five revealing, entertaining California films, encompassing shorts and features, are collected in this set,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Collection: Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California | DVD Review

In the wake of the wild success of Jacques Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, the idiosyncratic French filmmaker was lured by Hollywood move to southern California to produce what would become Model Shop. With his wife and fellow cinematic genius Agnès Varda in tow, they moved to Los Angeles in 1967 where Varda would dive headlong into a series of expressively free form personal projects that would be begin with an adventure North to Sausalito where she would meet a distant relative and the subject of her first film included in Criterion’s wonderful new Agnès Varda in California Eclipse set, Uncle Yanco.

Fitting right in line with the personal essay films that would become somewhat of a signature in her late period output with works like The Gleaners and I and The Beaches of Agnès, Uncle Yanco is an invigorating sun-kissed introduction to the progressive, hippy lifestyle that her
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Daily | “Agnès Varda in California”

When, in 1967, Jacques Demy asked his wife, Agnès Varda to join him in California, where he was working on his first American feature (Model Shop, released in 1969), she agreed. Turns out, she was surprised to find herself falling in love with Los Angeles the moment she arrived. And she got to work, making three of the films collected in Criterion's box set Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California; she'd return in the early 80s to make the two others. We're collecting reviews of Uncle Yanco (1967), Black Panthers (1968), Lions Love (…And Lies) (1969), Murs Murs (1980) and Documenteur (1981). » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | “Agnès Varda in California”

When, in 1967, Jacques Demy asked his wife, Agnès Varda to join him in California, where he was working on his first American feature (Model Shop, released in 1969), she agreed. Turns out, she was surprised to find herself falling in love with Los Angeles the moment she arrived. And she got to work, making three of the films collected in Criterion's box set Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California; she'd return in the early 80s to make the two others. We're collecting reviews of Uncle Yanco (1967), Black Panthers (1968), Lions Love (…And Lies) (1969), Murs Murs (1980) and Documenteur (1981). » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Cannes: Agnes Varda to Receive Honorary Palme d’Or

Cannes: Agnes Varda to Receive Honorary Palme d’Or
Part of a wave of welcome recognition, influential filmmaker Agnes Varda will receive an honorary Palme d’Or at this year’s 68th Cannes Festival. She follows in the footsteps of just Woody Allen (2002), Clint Eastwood (2009) and Bernardo Bertolucci (2011).

The award goes to renowned directors whose works have achieved global impact but who have never won the Cannes Festival’s Palme d’Or, the festival explained, announcing the honor Saturday. Varda will receive the plaudit at the Cannes Festival’s closing ceremony on May 24.

The honorary Palme d’Or follows a tribute at 2014’s Locarno Festival and a lifetime achievement award from the European Film Academy, presented last December at the 27th European Film Awards.

It marks recognition for a figure whose career is often associated with the French Nouvelle Vague but begun a half-decade before with 1954’s “La Pointe Courte,” her first feature film, which starred Philippe Noiret and was edited by Alain Resnais.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

European Film Academy to Honor Agnes Varda

European Film Academy to Honor Agnes Varda
London – The European Film Academy is to present writer-director Agnes Varda with its lifetime achievement award for her body of work, and in recognition of her contribution to the world of film.

Varda is an “important voice in French and European cinema as well as in the world of art,” the academy said.

Varda’s first film, “La Pointe Courte” (1954), gave a glimpse of her personal style and earned her the title of “grandmother of the French New Wave.” Her film “Cleo From 5 to 7” (1961) was selected at Cannes Festival and won the French critics’ Award.

Varda has created more than 30 short, documentary and fiction films for both TV and cinema, as well staging many exhibitions of photographs and art installations.

Among her films are “Lions Love (… and Lies)” (1968), “Documenteur” (1981), which shot in Los Angeles, “One Sings the Other Doesn’t” (1976), and “Jacquot (De Nantes)” (1990).

Among the major awards
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Highlights from the Locarno Film Summer Academy Master Class with Award-winning Director Agnès Varda

Stefano Knuchel, Head of the Locarno Film Summer Academy, invited me to sit in on his master class with the 2014 Locarno International Film Festival’s Pardo d’onore Swisscom winner French film director Agnès Varda.

Known as the Grandmother of the French New Wave (a term with which she takes issue, as I cite in my Conversation with Varda).Varda’s film credits include "La Pointe Courte" (1955), "Cleo from 5 to 7" (Cléo de 5 à 7, 1962), "The Creatures" (Les Créatures 1966), "Lions Love (…and Lies)" (1969), "Documenteur" (1981),"Vagabond"(Sans toit ni loi, 1985), "The Gleaners and I" (Les glaneurs et la glaneuse, 2000) and " The Beaches of Agnès" (Les Plages d’Agnès, 2008).

Speaking to the group of international students, Varda shared her passion for cinema, photography, and installation work, with humor and honesty. Here are some highlights from Varda’s talk.

I asked Varda about finding inspiration and her writing process

I don’t search for ideas; I find them. They come to me or I have none. I would not sit at a table and think now I have to find ideas. I wait until something disturbs me enough, like a relationship I heard about, and then it becomes so important I have to write the screenplay.

I never wrote with someone else or directed together. I wouldn’t like that. I never worked with (her late husband, director Jacques) Demy. We would show screenplays to each other when we were finished.

When you are a filmmaker, you are a filmmaker all the time. Your mind is recording impressions, moods. You are fed with that. Inspiration is getting connections with the surprises that you see in life. Suddenly it enters in your world and it remains; you have to let it go and work on it. It’s contradictory.

Question from Student: How did you manage to navigate a male-dominated film world?

First, stop saying it’s a male world. It’s true, but it helps not to repeat it. When I started in film, I did a new language of cinema, not as a woman, but as a filmmaker. It is still a male world, as long women are not making the same salary as men.

Put yourself in a situation where you want to make films; whether you are woman or not a woman, give yourself the tools: maybe you intern, maybe you go to school, or read books. Get the tools.

On Filmmaking

We have to capture in film what we don’t know about.

If you don’t have a point-of-view it’s not worth starting to make a film.

Whatever we do in film is searching. If you meet somebody, you establish yourself, who you want to meet, what kind of relationship it is. Our whole life is made up of back and forth, decisions, options -- and then they don’t fit.

When one is filming we should be fragile; listen to that something in ourselves. The act of filming for me is so vivid, it includes what you had in mind, and includes what is happening around you at that moment -- how you felt, if you have headache, and so on. A film builds itself with what you don’t know.

Life interferes. You have friends. Kids. No kids. Then there is a leak on the wall. Everything interferes. It’s how you build the life with others.

Sometimes I go by myself to do location scouting. When I go by myself, something speaks to me in a place I’ve chosen and I know maybe we should take advantage of that. We have to be working with chance. ‘Chance’ is my assistant director.

About Cleo de 5-7

I had to be able calculate the time of speaking, taking a taxi, and so on -- it was very interesting to write what was happening and try the mechanical thing of time, to let emotion and surprise come in.

About Vagabond

I knew people who were on the road. I knew the kind of people she (Mona, the protagonist) would meet. I would write the dialogue the night before. The people I met gave me their attitude and state of mind.

About "The Beaches of Agnès"

It was supposed to be autobiographical. Like a gesture of a painter, when they do a self-portrait and look at themselves and paint. In "The Beaches of Agnès" I am turning the mirror to the people who surround me; it’s not so much about what I did in my past. It is about how you build the life with others. I am turning the mirror to the people who surround me.

Varda on Varda

In the last ten years, I’ve done installations in museums and galleries. I enjoy that other expression of things. I got out of the flat film screen -- to invade the space, using three- dimensional objects. It helps to express other things. You put yourself at risk. I’ve been experimenting in motion, and surprises.I’m naturally curious.

Award-winning screenwriter and filmmaker, Susan Kouguell teaches screenwriting at Purchase College and presents international workshops and seminars on screenwriting and film. Author of Savvy Characters Sell Screenplays! and The Savvy Screenwriter, she is chairperson of Su-City Pictures East, LLC, a consulting company founded in 1990 where she works with over 1,000 writers, filmmakers, and executives worldwide. www.su-city-pictures.com, http://su-city-pictures.com/wpblog
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Locarno Honor Marks the Latest of Agnes Varda’s Lifetime Achievements

Locarno Honor Marks the Latest of Agnes Varda’s Lifetime Achievements
2014 is shaping up to be the Year of Agnes Varda.

This week, the free-spirited French director will receive the Pardo d’onore Swisscom at the Locarno Film Festival, which is just the latest in a series of honors, distinctions, appearances, exhibitions, restorations, retrospectives, seances, soirees and other all-around cool happenings that this 86-year-old filmmaker, photographer and artist has been involved in so far this year.

For the uninitiated, Varda is one of the key innovators of independent cinema in France. Long before John Cassavetes picked up a camera in the States, before the French New Wave was even a swell on the horizon, Varda had the impulse to make a personal movie called “La Pointe courte,” which launched the film careers of actor Philippe Noiret, herself and (to some extent) the editor who agreed to help Varda how to assemble her first feature, Alain Resnais.

That was 1955. Resnais went on
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Official Lineup for the 67th Locarno Film Festival

  • MUBI
Above: Pedro Costa's Horse Money

The Locarno Film Festival has announced their lineup for the 67th edition, taking place this August between the 6th and 16th. It speaks for itself, but, um, wow...

"Every film festival, be it small or large, claims to offer, if not an account of the state of things, then an updated map of the art form and the world it seeks to represent. This cartography should show both the major routes and the byways, along with essential places to visit and those that are more unusual. The Festival del film Locarno is no exception to the rule, and I think that looking through the program you will be able to distinguish the route map for this edition." — Carlo Chatrian, Artistic Director

Above: Matías Piñeiro's The Princess of France

Concorso Internazionale (Official Competition)

A Blast (Syllas Tzoumerkas, Greece/Germany/Netherlands)

Alive (Jungbum Park, South Korea)

Horse Money (Pedro Costa,
See full article at MUBI »

Locarno to honour Agnès Varda

  • ScreenDaily
Locarno to honour Agnès Varda
French director to receive the Pardo d’onore at the Locarno Film Festival next month - only the second woman to receive the honour.

French director Agnès Varda is to receive the Pardo d’onore (honorary Leopard) at the 67th edition of the Locarno Film Festival (Aug 6-16).

The festival’s tribute to her will be accompanied by screenings of a selection of her films: the features Cleo from 5 to 7 (1962), The Creatures (1966), Lions Love (…and Lies) (1969), Documenteur (1981), Vagabond (Sans toit ni loi, 1985), The Gleaners and I (Les glaneurs et la glaneuse, 2000) and The Beaches of Agnes (Les Plages d’Agnès, 2008), and the short film Oncle Yanco (1967), as well as the five episodes of the TV series Agnès de ci de là Varda (2011).

Varda will also take part in an on-stage coversation at the festival.

After working as a theatre photographer, Varda began directing in 1954 with the feature-length film La Pointe Courte, starring [link=nm
See full article at ScreenDaily »

French Auteur Agnes Varda To Receive Locarno Fest Honorary Golden Pard

French Auteur Agnes Varda To Receive Locarno Fest Honorary Golden Pard
Rome – Pioneering French auteur Agnes Varda, often called the “Mother of the French New Wave,” will be honored by the Locarno Film Festival with its Pardo d’onore Swisscom lifetime achievement award.

The Belgian-born Varda, 85, has directed more than 30 films over a career spanning more than six decades, starting with her 1954 “La Pointe Courte,” with Philippe Noiret, also at his debut. Edited by Alain Resnais, this pic about a young Parisian couple spending a few days in a village on the Mediterranean coast to decide whether to stay together or not became a defining influence on the next generation of Gallic directors.

The tribute to Varda from the Swiss fest dedicated to indie and cutting-edge cinema will comprise screenings of a wide selection of her films, including “Cleo from 5 to 7,” (1962); “The Creatures” (1966); “Lions Love (…and lies),” (1969); “Documenteur,” (1981), “Vagabond” (1985); “The Gleaners and I” (2000); “The Beaches of Agnes” (2008); and the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Filmmaker Agnes Varda Remembers a Hipper L.A., With Fewer Suits

Filmmaker Agnes Varda Remembers a Hipper L.A., With Fewer Suits
It took until the age of 85, but director Agnes Varda is finally getting the recognition she deserves. The Belgian-born helmer unleashed a tiny tsunami several years before the French New Wave with her first film, “La Pointe Courte” in 1955, paving the way for the household names who followed.

Now, with an Agnes Varda in Californialand exhibition running at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a show of new photographic work on view in Paris, and fresh restorations of her entire filmography playing around the world, Varda has suddenly become more visible.

At Lacma, she has erected a symbolic second home expressly for the exhibit. “I have one foot in Paris, one foot in Los Angeles,” she explains from inside what she calls “My Shack of Cinema” — a rudimentary bungalow whose slanted roof and stained-glass-like walls consist of celluloid strips repurposed from a print of her film “Lions Love,” a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

LACMA to Honor Martin Scorsese, Screen ‘Rebel Without a Cause’

LACMA to Honor Martin Scorsese, Screen ‘Rebel Without a Cause’
Even rebels need a little touch-up now and then.

On Nov. 1, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will unveil a fresh restoration of Nicholas Ray’s “Rebel Without a Cause” — just one of several recent Lacma events spotlighting the work of Martin Scorsese and his nonprofit preservation org, the Film Foundation.

The Gucci-sponsored restoration of “Rebel,” carried out by Warner Bros., demonstrates that popular pics can be just as susceptible to the effects of age as obscure ones. The original color negative had been badly faded and partly destroyed, owing to its use for repeated re-releases, while the stereo soundtrack master was erased and reused years ago.

On Nov. 2, the night after the “Rebel” screening, Lacma will honor both Scorsese and painter David Hockney at the museum’s third annual Art+Film Gala, a benefit reflecting the Lacma board’s newly enlightened view that film is art and deserves
See full article at Variety - Film News »

AFI Fest 2013 Unveils Poster And Announces Film Selections by Agnès Varda

The American Film Institute (AFI) announced a program of four films selected by Guest Artistic Director Agnès Varda to screen at AFI Fest 2013 presented by Audi. Varda, once a resident of Los Angeles, makes a rare return to present and discuss her work at AFI Fest. As an additional tribute to Varda, photos from her influential French New Wave film Cleo From 5 to 7 (CLÉO De 5 À 7) are featured in this year’s festival marketing and programming materials.

As Guest Artistic Director, Varda has selected films that have inspired her throughout her six-decade career: Pickpocket (Dir Robert Bresson, 1959), A Woman Under The Influence (Dir John Cassavetes, 1974), The Marriage Of Maria Braun (Dir Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1979) and After Hours (Dir Martin Scorsese, 1985). In addition, the festival will be screening a selection of Varda’s films, including restored versions of Cleo From 5 To 7 (CLÉO De 5 À 7) and Documenteur.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cannes 2010: Contemplating the red carpet, and Agnes Varda's 1969 head trip

Cannes 2010: Contemplating the red carpet, and Agnes Varda's 1969 head trip
The Cannes Film Festival has always been a place, or a state of mind, that revels in contradiction. It is, of course, one of the glitziest and most fashionable art spectacles in the world — a mod parade of the sports-car-and-champagne elite, so redolent of old money and upper-crust bourgeois-bohemian Euro-chic class. At the same time, the movies that are celebrated and end up winning prizes here have, as often as not, been resounding critiques of that very culture — dire warnings, in fact, about how the stratifications bred by money tear away at our humanity. To me, the quintessential image of
See full article at EW.com - The Movie Critics »

Director's Fortnight Honors Agnes Varda, Cinema Guild Honors Cinevardaphoto

Today we get word that Agnes Varda is this year's recipient of the Carosse d'Or award for lifetime achievement - an award given annually by the Director Fortnight folks. And in a separate news release, after putting out The Beaches of Agnes, The Cinema Guild folks have picked up the rights to another Varda title in Cinevardaphoto in what will be a comprehensive DVD edition... - She might be getting her senior citizen discounts, but she is most definitely isn't slowing down. Today we get word that Agnes Varda is this year's recipient of the Carosse d'Or award for lifetime achievement - an award given annually by the Director Fortnight folks. And in a separate news release, after putting out The Beaches of Agnes, The Cinema Guild folks have picked up the rights to another Varda title, this time Cinevardaphoto in what will be a comprehensive
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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