The Italian Job
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9 items from 2016


Five Films That Explain Why Britain Voted To Leave The EU

26 June 2016 2:25 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week, Neil Calloway suggests some films that explain why Britain voted to leave the EU…

Your social media feeds have been full of it for the past few days, with updates from people who you never knew were so politically engaged, but if you’re still confused as to why Britain voted to leave the EU, and what will happen next (and if you’re not confused about what will happen next, you should be), here are some films that might help explain why Britain voted to leave the EU.

The Full Monty – it was released almost twenty years ago now, but The Full Monty, and Brassed Off before it, show people struggling to cope in a post industrial Northern England; where once they had secure, unionised, relatively well paid jobs in traditional industries (be they coal mining or steel manufacturing), they are cast out into the unknown; living »

- Neil Calloway

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Maggie Blye, Actress in the Original 'The Italian Job,' Dies at 73

29 March 2016 1:08 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Maggie Blye, the blond Houston actress who supported such action films as Hombre, Hard Times and the original The Italian Job, has died. She was 73. Blye died on March 24 in West Hollywood after a two-year battle with cancer, her sister, casting director Judy Blye Wilson (The Young and the Restless), announced. Blye also portrayed the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor and Henry Fonda's characters in Ash Wednesday (1973) and appeared in Waterhole #3 (1967) opposite Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn and in Diamonds for Breakfast (1968) with Marcello Mastroianni. Blye stood out as the girlfriend of Benny Hill's

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- Mike Barnes

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Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

29 March 2016 10:56 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity »

- Carmel Dagan

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Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

29 March 2016 10:56 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity »

- Carmel Dagan

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A look at the best heists on film

16 March 2016 5:45 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Heist films are a perennial favourite amongst movie goers and the best of them are a heady concoction of suspense, ingenuity and maverick characters. A good heist film needs at least one intensely determined protagonist prepared to break every mold in his quest to pull off a brilliant job. From the original plan, to the inevitable errors and challenges along the way, through to the jubilant get-away scenes, an outstanding heist movie will keep you on the edge of your seat.

This feeling can be experienced throughout Ben Affleck’s The Town (2010), a movie set in Charlestown, Boston. This gritty, hard-hitting story sees a gang of old friends mastermind a daring bank robbery, which goes awry. One of the gang, Doug, must forge a relationship with the bank’s manager, Claire, in order to ascertain how much she knows and how much she’s told the police. Following the 2010 release of The Town, »

- The Hollywood News

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‘The Italian Job’ voted as having the best movie car chase of all-time

26 February 2016 2:24 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The Italian Job (1969)

The Oscars are taking place this weekend, and for once, a high-octane action film is listed amongst the movies going for Best Picture. Mad Max: Fury Road features some of the best car chase sequences ever committed to film, but which movie features the best car chase scene of all time? Well, the folks at JCT600 have conducted an independent survey, and asked 1,000 people to vote on which film features the best car chase ever.

Coming out on top with a hug majority is the 1969 Michael Caine film The Italian Job with over 30% of the vote.

Commenting on the result, Ian Davies (Mini Brand Director at JCT600) said: “It was with the release of The Italian Job that this iconic brand went from strength to strength. The film helped make the Mini part of British culture and the icon that it is today. The impressive car chase »

- The Hollywood News

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Oh! What a Lovely War

23 February 2016 10:28 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

A pure-gold Savant favorite, Sir Richard Attenborough's first feature as director is a stylized pacifist epic of the insane tragedy of WW1, told through contemporary songs, with the irreverent lyrics given them by the soldiers themselves. And one will not want to miss a young Maggie Smith's music hall performance -- luring young conscripts to doom in the trenches. It's the strangest pacifist film ever, done in high style. Oh! What a Lovely War DVD The Warner Archive Collection 1969 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 144 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 16.99 Starring: Too many to name, see below. Cinematography Gerry Turpin Production Design Donald M. Ashton Art Direction Harry White Choreography Eleanor Fazan Film Editor Kevin Connor Original Music Alfred Ralston Written by Len Deighton from the musical play by Joan Littlewood from the radio play by Charles Chilton Produced by Richard Attenborough, Brian Duffy, Len Deighton Directed »

- Glenn Erickson

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Douglas Slocombe, Acclaimed Cinematographer, Dead At Age 103

22 February 2016 3:20 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Slocombe with Harrison Ford and Steven Spielberg filming "Raiders of the Lost Ark" in 1981. (Photo: LucasFilm).

Douglas Slocombe, the acclaimed cinematographer and director of photography, has passed away at age 103. Slocombe was revered by directors over a career that extended from 1940 to 1989, when he lensed his final film, "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade". He had also filmed the first two entries in the Indiana Jones series, "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom". Slocombe never won an Oscar but was nominated for "Travels with My Aunt", "Julia" and "Raiders of the Lost Ark". He had been nominated for eleven BAFTA awards, winning three times. Slocombe's other major films include the Ealing Studios British comedy classics starring Alec Guinness, the classic chiller "Dead of Night", "The Blue Max", "The Lion in Winter", the original version of "The Italian Job", "The Fearless Vampire Killers", "The Great Gatsby »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Douglas Slocombe, Cinematographer for ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ Dies at 103

22 February 2016 12:05 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-nominated British cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, whose many films include several classic Ealing comedies in the 1940s and ’50s and the first three Indiana Jones pics in the 1980s, has died, his family told the Agence France-Presse. He was 103.

Slocombe drew Oscar noms for “Travels With My Aunt” in 1973, “Julia” in 1978 and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” in 1982. He is famous within the industry for never having used a light meter on the set of “Raiders.”

He shot Ealing comedies including “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” “The Lavender Hill Mob” and “The Man in the White Suit.”

During the 1960s he was d.p. on films including “The Servant,” “The Blue Max,” “The Fearless Vampire Killers,” “The Lion in Winter” and “The Italian Job.”

In addition to the pics for which he was Oscar nominated, he shot “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Maids” and “Rollerball” in the 1970s.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade »

- Carmel Dagan

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

9 items from 2016


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