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Film Review: ‘My Generation’

Film Review: ‘My Generation’
There’s a tremendous amount of pleasure to be had in David Batty’s “My Generation,” a sloppy wet kiss to Michael Caine and British youth culture of the 1960s. Loaded with great footage from the era and accompanied by superbly cleaned-up music tracks from the Kinks, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and many others, this love letter-as-documentary offers 85 minutes of good old fun. What it doesn’t do is posit any genuine analysis or even make a head-nod to diversity. But this is Caine’s narrative about the unapologetic working class taking over popular culture, and the writers as well as music mogul Simon Fuller, acting as top producer, have no interest in countering their star’s gleefully empowering chronicle of his youth. Voiceover interviews with such key players of the era as Paul McCartney, Marianne Faithfull, Twiggy and Mary Quant add to the overall feast, making the film an attractive offering for all platforms.

Britain
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Red Dwarf cast and co-creator interview: series Xii, the future

Rob Leane Oct 18, 2017

We interview Craig Charles, Chris Barrie, Robert Llewellyn, Danny John-Jules and Doug Naylor about Red Dwarf Xii and more...

It’s a good time to be a Red Dwarf fan. After years off our screens, and talk of a movie that ultimately came to naught, the show made its return with Back To Earth in 2009. UKTV Freeview channel Dave was revealed as the new home of the show, and it’s fair to say that they’ve treated the small rouge one very well in the years since the big comeback.

See related Geeks Vs Loneliness: belonging Geeks Vs Loneliness: coming out Geeks Vs Loneliness: don't give up Geeks Vs Loneliness: face-blindness Geeks Vs Loneliness: self-definition Geeks Vs Loneliness: just saying hello

Red Dwarf X followed in 2012, and Red Dwarf XI in 2016. Both series gave fans what they wanted to see: character-driven episodes, stuffed with creative insults,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Raising Caine: Sir Michael Going On In Style

Tony Black on screen legend Michael Caine

His recent political leanings aside, Sir Michael Caine remains one of the surviving legends of British and indeed American cinema of the last fifty years, and this weekend’s Going in Style–a heist caper directed by none other than ScrubsZach Braff–sees him share top billing with fellow aged legend Morgan Freeman for what seems the first time in a while. Over recent years the iconic British figure–known for his slick Cockney accent which bore fruit with numerous catchphrases in more than one seminal British film–has become more widely known to audiences as a character actor, heavily used in Christopher Nolan’s body of work since appearing as Alfred Pennyworth in Batman Begins.

So began a certain career resurgence for the man born Maurice Micklewhite under the sound of bow bells, but as Sir Michael–now into his 80’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Always in Style – The Forgotten Roles of Michael Caine

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Zehra Phelan

“You’re were only supposed to blow the bloody doors off” is and will always be Michael Caine’s most iconic line of all time, uttered in the 1969 British Caper The Italian Job. With a career spanning a hefty 64 years between 1953 and 2017, Caine hits our screens yet again this week starring opposite Morgan Freeman and Alan Arkin in Going in Style, a remake of the 1979 heist comedy directed by Zach Braff. It tells the story of a trio of retirees who plan to rob a bank after their pensions are cancelled, proving he isn’t quite ready to hang up his acting shoes to start drawing his own pension.

At the tender age of 84 the man previously known as Maurice Joseph Micklewhite, now known as Sir Michael Caine after being knighted by the queen in 2000, has starred in a staggering 125 films in his career to date. His
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The Essential British Films

Tom Jolliffe on the essential British films…

Article 50 is due to drop soon. Britain flies the Euro coop. With that in mind, and more importantly because any time is a good time to acknowledge it, I thought I would list my essential British films. I’ve collated a list of not only my favourites, but hopefully a diverse mix that represents British cinema at its finest. It’s obviously a very difficult task because whilst I may be bias as a Brit, it goes without saying that we have a very commendable cinematic legacy here. We’ve had our share of classics and delivered an array of film icons such as James Bond (note…whilst I adore the legacy and there have been some classic Jb films, I’ve opted for a slightly less obvious listing).

Without further ado, here are my essential British films:

Withnail & I

Any film student
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

John Forgeham obituary

Veteran character actor who appeared in The Italian Job, Prime Suspect and Footballers Wives

John Forgeham, who has died aged 75, was a hard-living actor who brought some of his off-screen qualities to his best known television roles, which were often unsympathetic. As the loud-mouthed car mechanic Jim Baines in Crossroads, he was in the long-running soap at the height of its popularity, when the series was watched by some 18 million viewers (though loathed by the critics). For four years (1974-78), at one time with a curly perm redolent of the era, Jim belittled his wife, Muriel, whom he called “Mu” (played by Anne Rutter), and cheated on her with the motel garage’s secretary-turned-manager Sharon Metcalfe (Carolyn Jones). Despite the storylines, Forgeham was hugely popular, particularly with female viewers.

He continued to appear on television over the next two decades. However, by 1999, roles were drying up and he was working
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Five Films That Explain Why Britain Voted To Leave The EU

This week, Neil Calloway suggests some films that explain why Britain voted to leave the EU…

Your social media feeds have been full of it for the past few days, with updates from people who you never knew were so politically engaged, but if you’re still confused as to why Britain voted to leave the EU, and what will happen next (and if you’re not confused about what will happen next, you should be), here are some films that might help explain why Britain voted to leave the EU.

The Full Monty – it was released almost twenty years ago now, but The Full Monty, and Brassed Off before it, show people struggling to cope in a post industrial Northern England; where once they had secure, unionised, relatively well paid jobs in traditional industries (be they coal mining or steel manufacturing), they are cast out into the unknown; living
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Maggie Blye, Actress in the Original 'The Italian Job,' Dies at 73

Maggie Blye, Actress in the Original 'The Italian Job,' Dies at 73
Maggie Blye, the blond Houston actress who supported such action films as Hombre, Hard Times and the original The Italian Job, has died. She was 73. Blye died on March 24 in West Hollywood after a two-year battle with cancer, her sister, casting director Judy Blye Wilson (The Young and the Restless), announced. Blye also portrayed the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor and Henry Fonda's characters in Ash Wednesday (1973) and appeared in Waterhole #3 (1967) opposite Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn and in Diamonds for Breakfast (1968) with Marcello Mastroianni. Blye stood out as the girlfriend of Benny Hill's

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity
See full article at Variety - TV News »

A look at the best heists on film

Heist films are a perennial favourite amongst movie goers and the best of them are a heady concoction of suspense, ingenuity and maverick characters. A good heist film needs at least one intensely determined protagonist prepared to break every mold in his quest to pull off a brilliant job. From the original plan, to the inevitable errors and challenges along the way, through to the jubilant get-away scenes, an outstanding heist movie will keep you on the edge of your seat.

This feeling can be experienced throughout Ben Affleck’s The Town (2010), a movie set in Charlestown, Boston. This gritty, hard-hitting story sees a gang of old friends mastermind a daring bank robbery, which goes awry. One of the gang, Doug, must forge a relationship with the bank’s manager, Claire, in order to ascertain how much she knows and how much she’s told the police. Following the 2010 release of The Town,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘The Italian Job’ voted as having the best movie car chase of all-time

The Italian Job (1969)

The Oscars are taking place this weekend, and for once, a high-octane action film is listed amongst the movies going for Best Picture. Mad Max: Fury Road features some of the best car chase sequences ever committed to film, but which movie features the best car chase scene of all time? Well, the folks at JCT600 have conducted an independent survey, and asked 1,000 people to vote on which film features the best car chase ever.

Coming out on top with a hug majority is the 1969 Michael Caine film The Italian Job with over 30% of the vote.

Commenting on the result, Ian Davies (Mini Brand Director at JCT600) said: “It was with the release of The Italian Job that this iconic brand went from strength to strength. The film helped make the Mini part of British culture and the icon that it is today. The impressive car chase
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Oh! What a Lovely War

A pure-gold Savant favorite, Sir Richard Attenborough's first feature as director is a stylized pacifist epic of the insane tragedy of WW1, told through contemporary songs, with the irreverent lyrics given them by the soldiers themselves. And one will not want to miss a young Maggie Smith's music hall performance -- luring young conscripts to doom in the trenches. It's the strangest pacifist film ever, done in high style. Oh! What a Lovely War DVD The Warner Archive Collection 1969 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 144 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 16.99 Starring: Too many to name, see below. Cinematography Gerry Turpin Production Design Donald M. Ashton Art Direction Harry White Choreography Eleanor Fazan Film Editor Kevin Connor Original Music Alfred Ralston Written by Len Deighton from the musical play by Joan Littlewood from the radio play by Charles Chilton Produced by Richard Attenborough, Brian Duffy, Len Deighton Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Douglas Slocombe, Acclaimed Cinematographer, Dead At Age 103

  • CinemaRetro
Slocombe with Harrison Ford and Steven Spielberg filming "Raiders of the Lost Ark" in 1981. (Photo: LucasFilm).

Douglas Slocombe, the acclaimed cinematographer and director of photography, has passed away at age 103. Slocombe was revered by directors over a career that extended from 1940 to 1989, when he lensed his final film, "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade". He had also filmed the first two entries in the Indiana Jones series, "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom". Slocombe never won an Oscar but was nominated for "Travels with My Aunt", "Julia" and "Raiders of the Lost Ark". He had been nominated for eleven BAFTA awards, winning three times. Slocombe's other major films include the Ealing Studios British comedy classics starring Alec Guinness, the classic chiller "Dead of Night", "The Blue Max", "The Lion in Winter", the original version of "The Italian Job", "The Fearless Vampire Killers", "The Great Gatsby
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Douglas Slocombe, Cinematographer for ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ Dies at 103

Douglas Slocombe, Cinematographer for ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ Dies at 103
Oscar-nominated British cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, whose many films include several classic Ealing comedies in the 1940s and ’50s and the first three Indiana Jones pics in the 1980s, has died, his family told the Agence France-Presse. He was 103.

Slocombe drew Oscar noms for “Travels With My Aunt” in 1973, “Julia” in 1978 and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” in 1982. He is famous within the industry for never having used a light meter on the set of “Raiders.”

He shot Ealing comedies including “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” “The Lavender Hill Mob” and “The Man in the White Suit.”

During the 1960s he was d.p. on films including “The Servant,” “The Blue Max,” “The Fearless Vampire Killers,” “The Lion in Winter” and “The Italian Job.”

In addition to the pics for which he was Oscar nominated, he shot “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Maids” and “Rollerball” in the 1970s.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
See full article at Variety - Film News »

61 film books that are well worth your time

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Looking for good books about the movies to read? We've got a bumper selection of recommendations right here...

A confession. I actually started writing this article in 2013, and the reason you've only reading it now is that I've made sure I've read every book on this list, save for one or two where I've marked otherwise. As such, what you're getting is a very personal list of recommendations. Each of these books has at least something to it that I think is of interest to someone wanting to learn more about film - or just enjoy stories of movie making.

I've tended to avoid picture books, with one exception, as these ones I've chosen are all intended to be chock-full of words, to relax with at the end of a long day. Which is what I did. There are one or two notable omissions, as I'm still
See full article at Den of Geek »

Michael Caine to receive rare Efa honour

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caine to receive rare Efa honour
European Film Academy to award “long overdue” honour to veteran British actor.

Sir Michael Caine is to be presented with the Honorary Award of the Efa President and Board at the 28th European Film Awards - only the third time the honour as been bestowed in nearly 30 years.

The British actor, whose 60-year career has run from Alfie and The Italian Job to The Dark Knight trilogy, will accept the award at the EFAs on Dec 12 in Berlin.

Caine is also nominated for his performance in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth. He was previously nominated in 2001 for Fred Schepisi’s Last Orders.

In a joint statement, Efa Board chair Agnieszka Holland and Efa President Wim Wenders said: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine.

“This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts and has only been presented twice in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Caine to recieve rare Efa honour

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caine to recieve rare Efa honour
European Film Academy to award “long overdue” honour to veteran British actor.

Sir Michael Caine is to be presented with the Honorary Award of the Efa President and Board at the 28th European Film Awards - only the third time the honour as been bestowed in nearly 30 years.

The British actor, whose 60-year career has run from Alfie and The Italian Job to The Dark Knight trilogy, will accept the award at the EFAs on Dec 12 in Berlin.

Caine is also nominated for his performance in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth. He was previously nominated in 2001 for Fred Schepisi’s Last Orders.

In a joint statement, Efa Board chair Agnieszka Holland and Efa President Wim Wenders said: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine.

“This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts and has only been presented twice in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Caine to Receive European Film Academy Honorary Award

Michael Caine to Receive European Film Academy Honorary Award
London — Michael Caine will be presented with the Honorary Award of the European Film Academy president and board at the European Film Awards ceremony on Dec. 12. It is only the third time the award has been bestowed in almost 30 years.

Agnieszka Holland, chairwoman of the European Film Academy board, and Efa president Wim Wenders said in a statement: “We have come to the decision that we are long overdue on paying special tribute to Sir Michael Caine. This recognition to an outstanding film personality is coming from the bottom of our hearts, and has only been presented twice in the almost 30 years of the European Film Awards: to our founding member Manoel de Oliveira and to Michel Piccoli.”

Caine has performed in more than 100 films. His most memorable roles include the spy Harry Palmer in “The Ipcress File” (1965), womanizer “Alfie” (1966), the gangster Charlie Croker in “The Italian Job” (1969), the hairdresser
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doctor Who stuntman Derek Ware dies, aged 77

Doctor Who stuntman Derek Ware has died, aged 77.

Ware worked on the show from the very first episode and on several stories throughout the 1960s and '70s.

As part of his work on Doctor Who, he formed stunt team Havoc, providing the riders, fallers, drivers and horsemen who fought during Jon Pertwee's first years as the Doctor (via TobyHadoke.com).

Ware stopped working for the programme in 1971, and went on to appear on TV shows including EastEnders, Z-Cars and Grange Hill in both stunt and acting roles.

His film credits included The Italian Job, on which he was responsible for its iconic Mini chase, and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »
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