IMDb > Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969)
Goodbye, Mr. Chips
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Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.0/10   2,017 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
James Hilton (novel)
Terence Rattigan (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Goodbye, Mr. Chips on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 December 1969 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
He is a shy schoolmaster. She is a music hall star. They marry and immediately have 283 children...all boys! See more »
Plot:
A shy, withdrawn English schoolteacher falls for a flashy showgirl. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 7 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A Musical Remake That Didn't Need The Songs See more (42 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Peter O'Toole ... Arthur Chipping

Petula Clark ... Katherine Bridges

Michael Redgrave ... The Headmaster

George Baker ... Lord Sutterwick

Siân Phillips ... Ursula Mossbank
Michael Bryant ... Max Staefel
Jack Hedley ... William Baxter
Alison Leggatt ... Headmaster's Wife
Jenny Runacre
Clinton Greyn ... Bill Calbury
Barbara Couper ... Mrs. Paunceforth
Michael Culver ... Johnny Longbridge
Elspeth March ... Mrs. Summersthwaite
Clive Morton ... General Paunceforth
Ronnie Stevens ... Algie
Mario Maranzana ... Pompeii Guide
John Gugolka ... Sutterwick Jr.
Michael Ridgeway ... David
Tom Owen ... Farley
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Michael Audreson ... (uncredited)
Julian Barnes ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Leo Britt ... Elder Master (uncredited)
Nicholas Frankau ... Tardy Student (uncredited)
Gary Graham ... Schoolboy (uncredited)

Elspet Gray ... Lady Sutterwick (uncredited)
David Frankie Harman ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Patricia Hayes ... Miss Honeybun (uncredited)
Mark Danvers Heron ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Barbara Knox ... (uncredited)
Jeremy Lloyd ... Johnson (uncredited)
Craig Marriott ... New Boy (uncredited)
Jack May ... Price (uncredited)
James Payne ... Man at Theatre (uncredited)
Jeremy Ranchev ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Stephen Reed ... Schoolboy (uncredited)
Robert Rietty ... Jenkins (voice) (uncredited)
Sheila Steafel ... Tilly (uncredited)
Royston Tickner ... Policeman (uncredited)
Richard Vernon ... Chairman (uncredited)
Raymond Ward ... Schoolboy (uncredited)

Directed by
Herbert Ross 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
James Hilton  novel
Terence Rattigan  screenplay

Produced by
Mort Abrahams .... associate producer
Arthur P. Jacobs .... producer
 
Original Music by
John Williams (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Oswald Morris 
 
Film Editing by
Ralph Kemplen 
 
Casting by
Irene Howard (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Ken Adam 
 
Art Direction by
Maurice Fowler 
 
Costume Design by
Julie Harris 
 
Makeup Department
George Blackler .... makeup supervisor
Ivy Emmerton .... hairdresser
Bill Lodge .... makeup creator: Mr. O'Toole
 
Production Management
Dennis Hall .... production manager
David W. Orton .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Dominic Fulford .... assistant director
Gary White .... third assistant director: second unit (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Reg Bream .... chief draughtsman (uncredited)
Mickey Lennon .... assistant property master (uncredited)
Charles Torbett .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
John Bramall .... sound recordist
John Poyner .... dubbing editor
J.B. Smith .... dubbing mixer
A.W. Watkins .... recording supervisor
Brian Hickin .... foley editor (uncredited)
Van Allen James .... sound editor (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jimmy Turrell .... camera operator (as Jim Turrell)
Brian West .... photographer: second unit
Kenneth Atherfold .... grip (uncredited)
Dennis Fraser .... grip (uncredited)
Frank Wardale .... gaffer (uncredited)
Robert Willoughby .... special still photographer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Michael R. Sloan .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Ian Fraser .... associate musical supervisor
William Saracino .... music editor
John Williams .... conductor
John Williams .... music supervisor
Jack Clegg .... music recording engineer (uncredited)
Gordon Langford .... orchestrator (uncredited)
David Lindup .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Rita Davison .... continuity
Nora Kaye .... special assistant: Mr. Ross
Peter Perkins .... production assistant
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
USA:155 min | 152 min (original version) | 148 min (video version)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Metrocolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Mono (35 mm prints)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:PG | Finland:S | Netherlands:AL (1970) | Peru:PT | Sweden:Btl | UK:U (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) | USA:G

Did You Know?

Trivia:
First film of Jenny Runacre.See more »
Quotes:
Calbury:I've met you somewhere before. I certainly remember that voice.
Chips:Now here are your stick and hat, and that, as you plainly know, is the front door.
Calbury:Katie, you...?
Chips:Straight ahead, please.
Calbury:That voice. There's something about it. I don't know who you are, but I can guess what you are. You're a school teacher, aren't you?
Chips:Correct.
Calbury:I bet you give your boys hell.
Chips:Only the bad ones.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Fill the World With LoveSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
21 out of 25 people found the following review useful.
A Musical Remake That Didn't Need The Songs, 29 January 2005
Author: THOMAS C. RIZZO, JR. from LARGO, FLORIDA

Thirty years after the 1939 classic film won Robert Donat an Oscar and made Greer Garson a star, "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" overcame a multitude of problems before stumbling to the screen in this musical version. Original stars Rex Harrison and Samantha Eggar were replaced by Richard Burton and Lee Remick, who in turn were given the heave-ho in favor of - thankfully - Peter O'Toole and Petula Clark. Andre Previn's score was rejected, and the one eventually used was composed by - unfortunately - Leslie Bricusse. First-time director Herbert Ross was handed the monumental task of transforming a simple love story - that of a man for both his wife and students - into a big-budget extravaganza. That it succeeds as well as it does despite the many obstacles in its way is a testament to its two stars.

Arthur Chipping is a Latin teacher at Brookfield, a boys' school in suburban England where he himself was educated. Introverted and socially inept, he is dedicated to his students but unable to inspire them. Prior to summer holiday, a former student takes him to a London music hall to see an entertainment starring Katharine Bridges, the young lady he hopes to wed. The post-performance meeting is awkward for all, and Chips - as he is commonly known - sets off to explore some of Italy's ancient ruins. Unexpectedly, he runs into Katharine, who has booked a Mediterranean cruise to allow her time to mourn a failed love affair and ponder the direction of her career. In the time they spend together, she discovers a kind and gentle man beneath the befuddled exterior, and upon returning to London pursues him in earnest. When the fall term begins, Chips returns to Brookfield with his young bride, and the two settle into a life of quiet domesticity. Complications arise when aspects of Katharine's past surface, and again when World War II intrudes in their lives, but Chips is bolstered by his wife's support, and his new-found confidence makes him a favorite among the students.

Aside from a couple of musical interludes - the delightful music hall production number "London is London" and Katharine's declaration of love, "You and I" - most of Bricusse's songs, some of them performed in voice-over as the characters explore their emotions, are easily forgettable and in no way enhance the film. Eliminate the score entirely, and "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" works quite well as a drama. Terrence Rattigan's script retains elements of the original while expanding upon it and updating it by a couple of decades. He has crafted several scenes between Chips and Katharine that beautifully delineate their devotion to each other, and infused a few with comic relief courtesy of Katharine's friend and cohort, over-the-top actress Ursula Mossbank (delightfully played by Sian Phillips, O'Toole's real-life wife at the time). He also captures life at a British public school - the equivalent of a private academy here in the States - with unerring perfection.

Ross does well as a first-time director, liberally sprinkling the film with breathtakingly photographed moments - the opening credits sequence, during which the school anthem echoes in the vast stone hallways of the school, perfectly sets the tone for the film. Costumes and sets are true to the period. The students, portrayed by non-professionals who were enrolled at the school used as Brookfield, handle their various small supporting roles well.

Highest praise is reserved for Peter O'Toole and Petula Clark in the lead roles. O'Toole was long-established as a first-class dramatic actor, so his Academy Award-nominated performance here comes as no surprise. Clark, a veteran of some two dozen B-movies in the UK and the previous year's "Finian's Rainbow," is absolutely luminous as the music hall soubrette who forsakes a theatrical career in favor of life as a schoolmaster's wife. Her golden voice enriches her songs and almost allows us to overlook how insipid most of them are, and she more than matches O'Toole in their dramatic scenes together. The chemistry between the two is palpable and leaves us with no doubt that this is a couple very much in love.

This version of "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" is no classic like its predecessor, but hardly the disaster many critics described when it was released. Ignore the score, concentrate on the performances, and revel in the atmosphere Ross has put on the screen. It's a pleasant way to spend a rainy afternoon with someone you love.

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I LOVE this movie!!! Scarf_Girl
Sian Phillips cinicapr
Petula Clark seems like Kirsten Dunst... drfalken-2
Disappointed TS_Secretary
So when is it coming out on DVD? Pippin's Diamond
THERE IS A SCENE MISSING FROM THIS FILM readinglips
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