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Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) More at IMDbPro »C'era una volta il West (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 29 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Wamg Interview: Charles Bronson Scholar Paul Talbot – Author of Bronson’S Loose Again!

26 June 2016 7:11 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Bronson’s Loose Again!: On the Set with Charles Bronson is author Paul Talbot’s all-new companion volume to his acclaimed Bronson’s Loose!: The Making of the ‘Death Wish’ Films. His new book reveals more information on the Death Wish series and also details the complex histories behind eighteen other Charles Bronson movies. Documented herein are fascinating tales behind some of the finest Bronson films of the mid-1970s (including Hard Times  and From Noon Till Three); his big-budget independent epics Love And Bullets and Cabo Blanco; his lesser-known, underrated dramas Borderline and Act Of Vengeance; his notorious sleaze/action Cannon Films classics of the 80s (including 10 To Midnight, Murphy’S Law and Kinjite: Forbidden Sunjects); the numerous unmade projects he was attached to; and his TV movies of the 90s (including The Sea Wolf). Exhaustively researched, the book features over three dozen exclusive, candid interviews including »

- Tom Stockman

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Review: "My Name Is Nobody" (1973) Starring Terence Hill And Henry Fonda; Blu-ray Release From Image

25 June 2016 3:52 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By John Lemay

My Name is Nobody is many things: a 1973  spoof of the “young and old gunslingers” sub-genre that began with For a Few Dollars More; Henry Fonda’s last Western (and Sergio Leone’s to an extent); and even a eulogy on the dying of the Spaghetti Western itself. Spearheaded by Sergio Leone himself, Nobody was directed by Tonino Valerii (Day of Anger) and teams Once Upon a Time in the West’s Henry Fonda with They Call Me Trinity’s Terence Hill. As a combo of Leone’s straight westerns and Hill’s “Beans Westerns” (a slang term for comedic Spaghettis) it amounts to quite the crossover film and could’ve easily been called “Once Upon A Time in the West They Called Me Trinity.” While it is never as funny as Hill’s two Trinity films or as epic as Leone’s “horse operas” it is »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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The Smallest Show On Earth: In Memory Of The Bijou (1957) And The Alger (1940-2015)

18 June 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The delightful British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth headlines a great Saturday matinee offering from the UCLA Film and Television Archive on June 25 as their excellent series “Marquee Movies: Movies on Moviegoing” wraps up. So it seemed like a perfect time to resurrect my review of the movie, which celebrates the collective experience of seeing cinema in a darkened, and in this case dilapidated old auditorium, alongside my appreciation of my own hometown movie house, the Alger, which opened in 1940 and closed last year, one more victim of economics and the move toward digital distribution and exhibition.

*******************************

“You mean to tell me my uncle actually charged people to go in there? And people actually paid?” –Matt Spenser (Bill Travers) upon first seeing the condition of the Bijou Kinema, in The Smallest Show on Earth

In Basil Dearden’s charming and wistful 1957 British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth (also »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Ennio Morricone to Release Album Featuring New Recordings of Classic Themes

6 June 2016 5:39 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Following up his Oscar win earlier this year for Quentin Tarantino‘s The Hateful Eight, the legendary composer Ennio Morricone seems to be as busy as ever. Ahead of his 88th birthday this fall, he’s currently on tour and on the same day that we’ll hear his new score for Terrence Malick‘s Voyage of Time, he’s set to release a new album.

The composer has signed a new record deal with Decca Records and the first album to be released is Morricone 60, which celebrates his six decades of work. Featuring a selection of new recordings with Czech National Symphony Orchestra, it includes themes from his Sergio Leone films, The Mission, Cinema Paradiso, and more, as well as his recent Oscar-winning work.

“After the success of The Hateful Eight score, I’m delighted to be returning to Decca with my own record deal – an extraordinary moment in my 60th professional anniversary year, »

- Jordan Raup

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Happy 86th Birthday Clint Eastwood! Here Are His Ten Best Films

31 May 2016 5:40 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Happy Birthday to one of We Are Movie Geeks favorite stars. Clint Eastwood was born on this day in 1930, making him 86 years old. The actor and two-time Oscar winning director hasn’t let his age slow him down a bit. Sully, his new movie as a director, opens in September.

We posted a list in 2011 of his ten best directorial efforts Here

Clint Eastwood has appeared in 68 films in his six (!) decades as an actor, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Honorable Mention: Honkytonk Man

By the 1980s, Clint Eastwood was one of Hollywood’s most bankable stars.  With his own production company, directorial skills, and economic clout, Eastwood was able to make smaller, more personal films.  A perfect example is the underrated Honkytonk Man, which also happens to be one of Eastwood’s finest performances. »

- Movie Geeks

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Colt: Western Series Being Developed by Sergio Leone Heirs

26 May 2016 6:29 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

The Spaghetti Western is coming to the small screen. Variety reports the heirs of filmmaker Sergio Leone are developing a new TV series called Colt.

Leone is famous for his classic films like The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, Once Upon a Time in the West, and A Fistful of Dollars. The Western show comes from the late director's production company, Leone Film Group.

Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Book Review: “TCM Presents The Essentials—52 Must-see Movies And Why They Matter” (2016; by Jeremy Arnold; Foreword by Robert Osborne) (Running Press)

16 May 2016 3:10 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

The Essentials”—A Good Starting Point

By Raymond Benson

Any book that claims to be a collection of the “best” of something—whether it is a listing of movies, music, art, and so forth—has to be taken with a grain of salt. These kinds of things are entirely subjective; although in this case, TCM (Turner Classic Movies) does have a kind of clout and expertise in the matter.

That said, we have this beautifully-designed and illustrated coffee-table trade paperback that contains not 1000, not 100, not 50... but 52 “essential must-see movies.” TCM’s spokesperson, Robert Osborne, explains the criteria in his Foreword—“The Essentials” is a weekly Saturday night event on the television network in which a guest host (the likes of Rob Reiner, Sydney Pollack, Peter Bogdanovich, Drew Barrymore, and more) introduce a picture he or she believes is an Essential. The book is a collection of some of these Essentials, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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The 80 Best-Directed Films, According to the Directors Guild of America

3 May 2016 6:59 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With editors and cinematographers chiming in on the best examples of their craft in cinema history, it’s now time for directors to have a say. To celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Directors Guild of America, they’ve conducted a poll for their members when it comes to the 80 greatest directorial achievements in feature films since the organization’s founding in 1936. With 2,189 members participating, the top pick went to Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather, one of three films from the director making the top 10.

Even with films from nonmembers being eligible, the male-dominated, America-centric choices are a bit shameful (Kathryn Bigelow is the only female director on the list, and the first foreign film doesn’t show up until number 26), but not necessarily surprising when one looks at the make-up of its membership. As with any list, there’s bound to be disagreements (Birdman besting The Bicycle Thief, »

- Jordan Raup

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"A Touch of Zen": King Hu’s Masterful Concoction of Cinematic Flavors

21 April 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Widely and rightly regarded as not only one of the finest martial arts films ever made, but one of the greatest works in of all Chinese cinema, King Hu’s A Touch of Zen (Xia nü, 1971) is most often lauded for its extraordinary fight sequences. Why the film is so exceptional, however, is that as great as these fight scenes are (and they are spectacular), they may not even be the best part of the movie. With 180 minutes to work with in its complete uncut version, which will screen in a new 4K restoration at Film Forum April 22 through May 5, Hu launches A Touch of Zen above most of its genre, above even his own impressive output, amplifying the essentials of the martial arts film while infusing it with other cinematic ingredients. The first shot of A Touch of Zen is of a spider moving in on its cobweb-entangled prey. »

- Jeremy Carr

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Top 10 Opening Scenes in Film

19 April 2016 6:40 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

How do you ensure that your film gets off to a good start? Make the opening scene unforgettable. These are our picks for the 10 best opening scenes in film. 

Spring is upon us, and what better way to celebrate the beginning of brighter days than to celebrate the best film beginnings of all time! Check back all month long as we look at the films with the best beginnings.

Check out the previous entries into this series here:

Top 10 Opening Shots in Film

Top 10 Opening Title Sequences in Film

So far this month we’ve looked at the best opening shots and the best title sequences in film. But although those aspects of a film can be important, they pale in comparison to what an opening scene can do to a film. An opening scene is what officially starts a film. It sets up the story, introduces characters, allows the »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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How ‘Battlestar Galactica,’ ‘Outlander’ composer Bear McCreary is raising the bar on music for TV

7 April 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

If you’ve watched TV in the past 10 years, chances are you know Bear McCreary’s music. He’s become one of the most (if not the most) sought-after and prolific composers in television, ever since he came into his own writing the boundary-pushing score for the reimagined Battlestar Galactica series. He counts The Walking Dead, Outlander, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. among his credits. And this March theater-goers got to experience his music with a big screen presentation; he composed the chilling and thrilling score for J.J. Abrams’ 10 Cloverfield Lane. Today McCreary is juggling so many projects that he can’t count all his current TV shows and movies and video games — “I can’t even tell. I honestly don’t even know,” how many projects he’s in the midst of, he said during an interview at Cafe Laurent in Culver City, CA.  The »

- Emily Rome

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Rewind This! – The Review: A Look Back at the Days of VHS

10 March 2016 5:53 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

I admit it, I’m a sentimental old fart.  I get choked up and maudlin very often, when I think of family and friends, a moment in time when I realized the tragedy life can bring to us, or the joy.  I tear up at the movies regularly, or reading certain passages in books. But I never thought I would weep at the loss of a video system.  If you read We Are Movie Geeks regularly you must be aware of the video revolution of the 1980s, when VHS players and recorders found a place in almost every home in America.  I hope you recall the early days when VHS was neck and neck with Betamax, a technically better system. Remember the days of Mom and Pop video rental stores when almost anyone could open a store front, and with a collection of VHS tapes start making money?  As one of the many, »

- Sam Moffitt

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A Look Inside Metrograph, New York City’s New Independent Theater

2 March 2016 1:14 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Let’s start with this obvious point: few cities need another repertory outlet less than New York City, which provides enough decent-to-outstanding options every week (or day) to fully occupy any caring customer. And so when a new theater, Metrograph, was announced this past August, the largely enthusiastic response — people taking note of a good location, a dedication to celluloid presentations and new independent releases, its strong selection of programmers, and other services (e.g. a restaurant and “cinema-dedicated bookshop”) — went hand-in-hand with some people’s skepticism, or at least a certain raising of the eyebrows. The question of necessity was premature, but such is the influx of available material that it should inevitably come up.

It’s safe to say their first selections silenced those skeptics. Metrograph’s slate is strong in a way that’s uncommon; one could say it’s exactly the sort that a cinephile with »

- Nick Newman

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How Quentin Tarantino and Oscar Winner Ennio Morricone Came Together on 'The Hateful Eight' Score

29 February 2016 11:36 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Before working together on "The Hateful Eight," Quentin Tarantino and the venerable composer Ennio Morricone, renowned for working with Sergio Leone on such spaghetti westerns as "Once Upon a Time in the West" and "A Fistful of Dollars," had circled each other respectfully for years. After all, Tarantino had been using parts of Morricone's scores since "Kill Bill" and approached him to no effect on "Inglourious Basterds" and "Django Unchained." But instead of finding existing Morricone pieces he liked and fitting them into "The Hateful Eight," this time Tarantino flew to Italy to meet the maestro to see if he would be willing to write the director's first original score — and the Italian composer's first western score for 40 years, since the release of "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly." Read More: How Quentin Tarantino Changed His Ways on 'The Hateful Eight'  Usually »

- Anne Thompson

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Oscars: Tightest Race in Years Had a Few Surprises in Store

29 February 2016 11:18 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

I was asked at an after-party last night what my thought process was throughout the evening as the wins came down for the 88th Academy Awards. You know you have a close race when people are paying attention to the minutiae of what each announcement “means,” whether the signs were pointing to this or that, how the collective was speaking to the big win at the end of the night, etc.

In essence, I was having my view of the best picture race fortified all along. As “Mad Max: Fury Road” began to nab Oscar after Oscar, leaving “The Revenant” in its wake, it became clearer and clearer that Alejandro G. Inarritu’s film wasn’t taking best picture. But as such a divisive film, facing the math of the preferential ballot, that seemed obvious anyway — despite the fact that it was the favorite to win among the punditry. It »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Italy Cheers Ennio Morricone’s Oscar Win for ‘The Hateful Eight’ Score

29 February 2016 12:36 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Italy on Monday cheered Ennio Morricone’s Oscar victory for composing the original score for Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight,” which marks the first competitive Oscar won by the 87-year old maestro with more than 500 movie credits to this name.

“After an almost 60-year-long career, and five nominations which had left him empty-handed, Ennio Morricone finally brings an Oscar for best score home,” trumpeted daily La Republica on its website.

“Superb Maestro, finally!” tweeted Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi at dawn, Italian time. Also on Twitter Italo Culture Czar Dario Franceschini enthused that “an all-time movie giant has triumphed.”

Morricone, who received an honorary Oscar in 2007, had been nominated five previous times, for “Days of Heaven,” “The Mission,” “The Untouchables,” “Bugsy” and “Malena.”

Earlier this year he won a Golden Globe and a Bafta nod for the “Hateful Eight” score. He had previously won Golden Globes for “The Mission, »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Legendary Composer Ennio Morricone Wins Original Score Oscar for ‘Hateful Eight’

28 February 2016 8:27 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ennio Morricone claimed the best original score Oscar Sunday night for his work on Quentin Tarantino’s Western “The Hateful Eight,” the first competitive Oscar for the 87-year-old composer to date.

Morricone, who received an honorary Oscar in 2007, has been nominated five previous times, for “Days of Heaven,” “The Mission,” “The Untouchables,” “Bugsy” and “Malena.” All of that came, of course, many years after his iconic work with Sergio Leone on films like “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” and “Once Upon a Time in the West.”

Morricone composed the score without even seeing the film, conjuring it after a lengthy conversation with Tarantino at his Rome home and a reading of the screenplay. It was unusual for Tarantino in that he had never commissioned an original score for one of his films before, but familiar in that he could use the material and drop it in where he saw fit, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Where You'd Heard Oscar Nominee Ennio Morricone's Music Before The Hateful Eight

24 February 2016 8:10 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Well, more like, where haven't you heard it? The 87-year-old Ennio Morricone, who this year is nominated for his sixth Academy Award, is far from just being Quentin Tarantino's favorite composer ever: He's one of the most influential composers in modern cinema and maybe 20th-century music as a whole. As of this writing, Morricone is credited as a composer on 527 works at IMDb.com. Morricone played trumpet in jazz bands in the 1950s and eventually became a studio arranger for RCA. He achieved international fame with compositions for Sergio Leone's 1960s string of so-called "Spaghetti Westerns," including the Clint Eastwood vehicle The Good, »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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Oh! What a Lovely War

23 February 2016 10:28 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

A pure-gold Savant favorite, Sir Richard Attenborough's first feature as director is a stylized pacifist epic of the insane tragedy of WW1, told through contemporary songs, with the irreverent lyrics given them by the soldiers themselves. And one will not want to miss a young Maggie Smith's music hall performance -- luring young conscripts to doom in the trenches. It's the strangest pacifist film ever, done in high style. Oh! What a Lovely War DVD The Warner Archive Collection 1969 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 144 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 16.99 Starring: Too many to name, see below. Cinematography Gerry Turpin Production Design Donald M. Ashton Art Direction Harry White Choreography Eleanor Fazan Film Editor Kevin Connor Original Music Alfred Ralston Written by Len Deighton from the musical play by Joan Littlewood from the radio play by Charles Chilton Produced by Richard Attenborough, Brian Duffy, Len Deighton Directed »

- Glenn Erickson

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Ennio Morricone To Receive Star On The Hollywood Walk of Fame; Watch The Hateful Eight Recording Session

17 February 2016 9:49 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Ennio Morricone accepts an Honorary Academy Award during the 79th Annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, CA, on Sunday, February 25, 2007.

The Weinstein Company has released a 7-minute video from the actual recording session of L’Ultima Diligenza per Red Rock (versione integrale) from The Hateful Eight.

Featuring the legendary composer, Ennio Morricone, The Hateful Eight is nominated for 3 Academy Awards this year, including Best Original Score.

In The Hateful Eight, set six or eight or twelve years after the Civil War, a stagecoach hurtles through the wintry Wyoming landscape. The passengers, bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) and his fugitive Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh), race towards the town of Red Rock where Ruth, known in these parts as “The Hangman,” will bring Domergue to justice. Along the road, they encounter two strangers: Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson), a black former union soldier turned infamous bounty hunter, »

- Michelle McCue

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 29 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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