Alice's Restaurant
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12 items from 2010


Arlo Guthrie's 'Alice's Restaurant': Lyrics from the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

25 November 2010 8:53 AM, PST | Pop2it | See recent Pop2it news »

In all likeliness, you watched the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on NBC while cooking up a storm in your kitchen, probably still wearing your pajamas. If you're like us, when Arlo Guthrie performed his classic "Alice's Restaurant," you washed the turkey slime off your hands and hit the computer to look up the lyrics to the old favorite.

"It's getting to be that time of year again. Thanksgiving!" Guthrie recently wrote in a post on Arlo.net. "For whatever crazy reason the holiday and I are glued together. It's one of those unintentional accidents of nature. But, if you had to get stuck to a holiday, it could be worse than Thanksgiving. For that reason alone I'm pretty thankful."

Part song, part crazy rambling rant, "Alice's Restaurant" is an all-time Thanksgiving favorite.  Enjoy the lyrics below!

This song is called Alice's Restaurant, and it's about Alice, and the

restaurant, but »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Arthur Penn: a career in clips

30 September 2010 10:29 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Yesterday Arthur Penn, the director of Bonnie and Clyde, died aged 88. We look back over his career in clips

Arthur Penn cut his teeth as a director on the American television drama circuit of the 1950s, contributing to a range of the playhouse and showcase series that were a staple of the industry. Western stories were among the episodes he delivered and his feature debut was a genre piece, a version of the Billy the Kid story called The Left Handed Gun (1958), starring Paul Newman, also at the start of his cinema career after a small-screen apprenticeship. The film had hints of the broadly sympathetic – or at least empathetic – view of outlaw psychology that would mark Penn's most famous film.

For his next film, Penn drew on his stage directing experience, transferring to the screen the Broadway production of The Miracle Worker in which he directed Anne Sullivan and Patty Duke »

- Ben Walters

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Arthur Penn 1922-2010

29 September 2010 5:30 PM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

These celebrity deaths really do come in waves, don't they? This week we've had Gloria Stewart pass, along with Sally Menke's tragic death reported yesterday, and now director Arthur Penn has died of heart failure. Penn started in television where he directed a critically-aclaimed adaptation of The Miracle Worker. Later, he would direct a film version with Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke in the leads. Of course, he's most famous for his work on Bonnie and Clyde, the 1967 gangster film that shocked audiences with its portrayal of violence. The film became a watershed moment in American cinema, paving the way for New Hollywood filmmakers like Coppola, Altman, Ashby, and many others. Penn made other notable films afterwards, such as Little Big Man, Night Moves, and Alice's Restaurant. In recent years, he returned to TV, producing some episodes of Law and Order. He is survived by his wife, two children, »

- Aaron

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Arthur Penn obituary

29 September 2010 11:28 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

American director best known for Bonnie and Clyde, he focused on disillusioned outsiders

Arthur Penn, who has died aged 88, was one of the major figures of Us television, stage and film in the 1960s and 70s when the three disciplines actively encouraged experimentation, innovation and challenging subject matter. "I think the 1960s generation was a state of mind," he said, "and it's really the one I've been in since I was born." He will be best remembered for Bonnie and Clyde (1967), a complex and lyrical study of violent outsiders whose lives became the stuff of myth.

The film, starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, and based on the exploits of the bank-robbing Barrow Gang in the 1930s, became a cause celebre. It was praised and attacked for its distortion, bad taste and glorification of violence in equal measure. Newsweek's critic, Joseph Morgenstern, retracted his initial view of the film's violence, »

- Sheila Whitaker

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Bonnie and Clyde director Arthur Penn dies aged 88

29 September 2010 10:03 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Director of seminal crime movie and John F Kennedy's debate coach died at home of heart failure

Bonnie and Clyde famously bowed out in a hail of bullets, gunned down by police in what came billed as the bloodiest death scene in American movies. For the man who called the shots, behind the camera, the end was altogether more peaceful. Director Arthur Penn died quietly at home on Tuesday night, a day after his 88th birthday. His daughter said he died of congestive heart failure.

Born in Philadelphia, the younger brother of the photographer Irving Penn, the director galvanised the crime genre with his 1967 film starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the lovers on the run. It juggled the freewheeling flavour of the French New Wave with an explicit, stylised violence that was hitherto unknown in mainstream American cinema. Penn's playful, muscular style of directing would prove a major »

- Xan Brooks

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Arthur Penn, Director Of "Bonnie And Clyde", Dead At Age 88

29 September 2010 9:11 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Penn consults with Bonnie and Clyde stars Warren Beatty and Alexandra Stewart on the set of Mickey One. (Photo: Sam Falk/ NY Times)

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Arthur Penn, the acclaimed director of stage, TV and screen, has died at age 88. A low-key man not prone to publicity or bombast, Penn quietly changed the course of cinematic history with his direction of the ground-breaking 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde, which ushered in a New Wave of American cinema. Penn had already gained acclaimed through his work in the early days of TV. He directed the television adaptation of The Miracle Worker, as well as both the hit Broadway and big screen versions of the story. Penn also played a key role in American political history by advising John F. Kennedy how to prepare for his presidential debate against Richard Nixon in 1960. Most audiences who heard the debate on radio thought Nixon was the winner, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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'Bonnie and Clyde' director dies at 88

29 September 2010 9:04 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Arthur Penn, the director of the polarizing "Bonnie and Clyde" whose films often flew in the face of American mythology, died Tuesday, one day after his 88th birthday.

Daughter Molly Penn said her father died of congestive heart failure at his Manhattan home. Longtime friend and business manager Evan Bell said Wednesday that Penn had been ill for about a year.

A product of the golden era of live television and an accomplished theater director, Penn's work on "The Miracle Worker" earned him an Emmy nomination in 1957, a Tony in 1959 and an Oscar nom in 1962. At one time, Penn had five hits running simultaneously on Broadway.

Penn was one of a group of directors -- including John Frankenheimer, Sidney Lumet and Norman Jewison -- whose films were intelligent glimpses into politics, morals and social institutions. Often, they were met with controversy.

His movies debunked the allure of the gunman, the »

- By Duane Byrge

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Werner & Errol & the images in their caves

19 September 2010 11:33 AM, PDT | blogs.suntimes.com/ebert | See recent Roger Ebert's Blog news »

• Toronto Report #3

Werner Herzog and Errol Morris have been friends for a very long time, from the days in the 1970s when Morris saw Herzog's first films at the Univ. of Wisconsin and decided to become a filmmaker. Errol told Herzog of a film he wanted to shoot, but kept delaying. Herzog told him he needed more self-discipline. He added: "If you make this film, I'll eat my shoe."

That led to a famous evening at the Pacific Film archive in Berkeley, at which Herzog sat on the stage and did indeed eat his shoe. He was assisted in its preparation by the famous chef Alice Waters -- perhaps suggesting that you can find everything you don't want at Alice's Restaurant. The meal was the subject of a famous documentary by Les Blank titled "Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe."

On Sept. 13, 2010, Morris and Herzog both premiered their new films at »

- Roger Ebert

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Timothy Olyphant: a law unto himself

30 April 2010 3:38 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

He made his mark in the HBO western Deadwood. Now Timothy Olyphant is playing another lawman in the upcoming Justified

Timothy Olyphant is thinking about the Sex Pistols. "I was at an Arlo Guthrie show at UCLA last week," he says, rolling his eyes at the thought of the ancient singer of the hippy anthem Alice's Restaurant. "I just remember thinking, 'Man, if [former Pistols guitarist] Steve Jones was here he'd start booing,' and I really, really wanted to do the booing for him. Man, that show was a snore – I just didn't believe a word that came out of their mouths."

Punk credentials firmly established, Olyphant sips his latte, which has a perfect heart sculpted into its milky surface. The Steve Jones connection isn't so odd. For years, the ex-Pistol had the lunchtime spot ("Jonesey's Jukebox") on La radio station Indie 103.1. The show before that had Olyphant as its on-air, unpaid sports commentator. »

- John Patterson

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Timothy Olyphant: a law unto himself

29 April 2010 12:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

He made his mark in the HBO western Deadwood. Now Timothy Olyphant is playing another lawman in the upcoming Justified

Timothy Olyphant is thinking about the Sex Pistols. "I was at an Arlo Guthrie show at UCLA last week," he says, rolling his eyes at the thought of the ancient singer of the hippy anthem Alice's Restaurant. "I just remember thinking, 'Man, if [former Pistols guitarist] Steve Jones was here he'd start booing,' and I really, really wanted to do the booing for him. Man, that show was a snore – I just didn't believe a word that came out of their mouths."

Punk credentials firmly established, Olyphant sips his latte, which has a perfect heart sculpted into its milky surface. The Steve Jones connection isn't so odd. For years, the ex-Pistol had the lunchtime spot ("Jonesey's Jukebox") on La radio station Indie 103.1. The show before that had Olyphant as its on-air, unpaid sports commentator. »

- John Patterson

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Dede Allen obituary

28 April 2010 11:26 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Innovative American film editor best known for her work on Bonnie and Clyde

Dede Allen, who has died after a stroke aged 86, not only broke into the predominantly male preserve of film editing, but developed a style and made innovations so distinctive that a school of editing was named in her honour. She was one of the great practitioners of movie-making.

Yet she worked rarely in Hollywood, did not achieve notable success until the age of 42, and despite receiving several Oscar nominations and the first solo onscreen credit for an editor at the beginning of a film, she was never well known. The job is highly technical and riddled with jargon, yet it is also an art, which is how Allen viewed it.

The film that made her name was Arthur Penn's 1967 hit, Bonnie and Clyde, about the doomed 1930s bank-robbing couple Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, played by Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty. »

- Christopher Reed

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Script shortcuts sure path to development hell

27 January 2010 12:00 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

My first screenwriting teacher at the Nyu film school was Patricia Cooper, who'd served as the highest female executive at a major studio at that time, overseeing big movies at Paramount in the '70s. She marched our class up to the Gulf & Western Building at Columbus Circle and sat us down in a screening room that resembled what I imagined a first-class airline compartment looked like, then showed us Francis Ford Coppola's "The Conversation."

As we gushed over it afterward, she praised the film but confessed to disappointment with the script. This was my first glimpse of major-league Hollywood story development.

My second teacher was Venable Herndon, co-author of Arthur Penn's "Alice's Restaurant." Venable's class was like some Reichian encounter group, but to get out of it in one piece, you didn't have to bare your primal wounds, only write a screenplay.

My third teacher was once-blacklisted Ian McLellan Hunter, »

- By Tom Silvestri

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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

12 items from 2010


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