Alice's Restaurant (1969) - News Poster

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Phil Ramone, Grammy-Winning Producer, Dead at 79

Phil Ramone, Grammy-Winning Producer, Dead at 79
Phil Ramone, the masterful Grammy Award-winning engineer, arranger and producer whose platinum touch included recordings with Ray Charles, Billy Joel and Paul Simon, died Saturday of complications stemming from heart surgery, his family said. He was 79. Ramone, who lived in Wilton, Conn., had elective surgery on Feb. 27 to prevent an aortic aneurysm, son Matt Ramone said. He later developed pneumonia and died Saturday morning at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, the son said. Few in the recording industry enjoyed a more spectacular and diverse career. Phil Ramone won 14 competitive Grammy Awards and one for lifetime achievement. Worldwide sales for his projects topped 100 million.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

10 Great Thanksgiving Movies: From 'Home for the Holidays' to 'Planes, Trains and Automobiles'

"Miracle on 34th Street" (1947): Christmas is the holiday commonly associated with this classic, which actually is set in motion by the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, in which the man (Oscar winner Edmund Gwenn) playing Santa claims to be the real Kris Kringle.

"Alice's Restaurant" (1969): Arlo Guthrie adapts his classic song by playing himself as he visits eatery owner Alice (Patricia Quinn) at Thanksgiving ... and ends up in trouble with the law.

"Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986): One of Woody Allen's warmest comedies gathers an extended family for two Thanksgivings and boasts Oscar-honored performances by Dianne Wiest and Michael Caine.

"Planes, Trains and Automobiles" (1987): High on many lists of holiday humor, filmmaker John Hughes' tale makes mismatched traveling companions of Steve Martin and John Candy. How mismatched? Well, let's just say, "Those aren't pillows."

"Dutch" (1991): A man (Ed O'Neill) volunteers to bring his love interest's ill-mannered son (Ethan Randall,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

The Five-Year Plan: October Albums

Yes, I have too much time on my hands. Here's a new feature that was fun to put together (though quite time-consuming, which makes me worry about my ability to do this every month). I look back at rock, pop, and R&B albums that came out five years ago, ten years ago, etc.

1967

Buffalo Springfield: Again (Atco)

There was much chaos surrounding the creation of this quintet 's second album. Bassist Bruce Palmer, in some ways the soul of the band, was unavailable due to a drug charge deportation, and a string of session players took his place. Stephen Stills, who saw himself as the leader of the group, was feuding with Neil Young, who considered himself an equal, and Young actually quit -- but returned. And that's without getting into the fiasco that was the band's management team.

Nonetheless, it was a quantum leap forward from their debut,
See full article at CultureCatch »

DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out Jules Dassin, Federico Fellini, Arthur Penn

Eiji Okada, Emmanuelle Riva in DGA (but not Oscar) nominee Alain Resnais' Hiroshima, mon amour (top); Melina Mercouri, Jules Dassin in Dassin's Oscar- (but not DGA-) nominated Never on Sunday (bottom) DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards 1953-1959: Odd Men Out Jack Clayton, David Lean, Stanley Donen 1960 DGA (14)Vincente Minnelli, Bells Are RingingWalter Lang, Can-CanDelbert Mann, The Dark at the Top of the StairsRichard Brooks, Elmer GantryAlain Resnais, Hiroshima, mon amourVincente Minnelli, Home from the HillCarol Reed, Our Man in HavanaCharles Walters, Please Don't Eat the DaisiesLewis Gilbert, Sink the Bismarck!Vincent J. Donehue, Sunrise at Campobello AMPASJules Dassin, Never on Sunday DGA/AMPASBilly Wilder, The ApartmentJack Cardiff, Sons and LoversAlfred Hitchcock, PsychoFred Zinnemann, The Sundowners   1961 DGA (21)Robert Stevenson, The Absent Minded ProfessorBlake Edwards, Breakfast at Tiffany'sWilliam Wyler, The Children's HourAnthony Mann, El CidJoshua Logan, FannyHenry Koster, Flower Drum SongRobert Mulligan, The Great ImpostorPhilip Leacock, Hand in HandJack Clayton,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Pete Seeger, Arlo Guthrie join Occupy Wall Street protestors

  • Pop2it
The Occupy Wall Street movement got a couple new members who know just a little bit about protesting. Folk music legends Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie joined the demonstrators Friday (Oct. 21) during a march through New York City's Upper West Side.

The 92-year-old Seeger, who wrote "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" and has long been a political activist, led the reported crowd of about 1,000 in protest songs and chants of "We are the 99 percent" and "We are unstoppable; another world is possible."

Guthrie, who wrote the famed anti-Vietnam war song "Alice's Restaurant Massacre," says of the protests, "It's reminiscent of the time when people were sort of without leaders, without agendas. Just something happened back around 1964, 1965. People felt like they oughta say something cause the world was going in a way that didn't seem right."

Since they began on Sept. 17, the Occupy Wall Street movement protesting corporate greed and
See full article at Pop2it »

Éric Rohmer's "Le Rayon Vert" (and More)

"Though Éric Rohmer's breakthrough film stateside was the lustrous black-and-white, winter-set My Night at Maud's (1969), the New Wave architect may be cinema's greatest chronicler of the summer vacation," suggests Melissa Anderson in the Voice. "Among the director's many holiday-set movies, Pauline at the Beach (1983) and A Summer's Tale (1996) explore both the languid pleasures and the romantic anguish of time off during the hottest season. Rohmer's 1986 masterpiece (being re-released with its original French title, which translates as 'The Green Ray'), Le Rayon Vert centers on those themes, too, but delivers something much richer: an absorbing, empathic portrait of a complex woman caught between her own obstinacy and melancholy."

"As Delphine, the lonely but defiant Paris secretary at the center of Le Rayon Vert, Marie Rivière creates an emotionally rich portrait of a young woman disappointed in love who transfers her energies into an anxious quest for the ideal summer vacation.
See full article at MUBI »

Arthur Penn receives Oscar ceremony tribute

Academy's In Memoriam segment remembers Bonnie and Clyde director Arthur Penn, who died in September aged 88

Bonnie and Clyde may have gone out in a hail of bullets and balletic violence, but its creator received a more sober, respectful send off as the Oscars paid tribute to director Arthur Penn. The American film-maker was honoured at the Academy Awards for a body of work that includes The Chase, Alice's Restaurant, Little Big Man, Night Moves and The Missouri Breaks.

Yet Penn, who died last September, aged 88, will best be remembered for Bonnie and Clyde, his freewheeling 1967 gangster picture that starred Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty.

Arthur PennOscars 2011OscarsAwards and prizesXan Brooks

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

A Serial Killer's Final Victims?

Rodney Alcala, California's "Dating Game Killer," has been indicted in the deaths of two New York City women in the 1970s. Christine Pelisek reports.

A New York grand jury has returned an indictment accusing California serial killer Rodney Alcala of the brutal rape and murder of two New York City women in the 1970s. Prosecutors say Manhattan socialite Ellen Jane Hover and Twa flight attendant Cornelia Crilley, both in their twenties when they died, are among the long list of victims of the so-called Dating Game killer.

Related story on The Daily Beast: The Hunt for the L.A. Serial Killer, Grim Sleeper

The ruling will begin the process of Alcala's extradition to New York to stand trial and, for the families of the two women, a long-awaited reckoning with their alleged killer.

Alcala, 67, is already on death row at San Quentin State Prison, outside San Francisco, convicted of the sexual assault,
See full article at The Daily Beast »

Arlo Guthrie's 'Alice's Restaurant': Lyrics from the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

  • Pop2it
In all likeliness, you watched the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on NBC while cooking up a storm in your kitchen, probably still wearing your pajamas. If you're like us, when Arlo Guthrie performed his classic "Alice's Restaurant," you washed the turkey slime off your hands and hit the computer to look up the lyrics to the old favorite.

"It's getting to be that time of year again. Thanksgiving!" Guthrie recently wrote in a post on Arlo.net. "For whatever crazy reason the holiday and I are glued together. It's one of those unintentional accidents of nature. But, if you had to get stuck to a holiday, it could be worse than Thanksgiving. For that reason alone I'm pretty thankful."

Part song, part crazy rambling rant, "Alice's Restaurant" is an all-time Thanksgiving favorite.  Enjoy the lyrics below!

This song is called Alice's Restaurant, and it's about Alice, and the

restaurant, but
See full article at Pop2it »

Arthur Penn: a career in clips

Yesterday Arthur Penn, the director of Bonnie and Clyde, died aged 88. We look back over his career in clips

Arthur Penn cut his teeth as a director on the American television drama circuit of the 1950s, contributing to a range of the playhouse and showcase series that were a staple of the industry. Western stories were among the episodes he delivered and his feature debut was a genre piece, a version of the Billy the Kid story called The Left Handed Gun (1958), starring Paul Newman, also at the start of his cinema career after a small-screen apprenticeship. The film had hints of the broadly sympathetic – or at least empathetic – view of outlaw psychology that would mark Penn's most famous film.

For his next film, Penn drew on his stage directing experience, transferring to the screen the Broadway production of The Miracle Worker in which he directed Anne Sullivan and Patty Duke
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Arthur Penn 1922-2010

These celebrity deaths really do come in waves, don't they? This week we've had Gloria Stewart pass, along with Sally Menke's tragic death reported yesterday, and now director Arthur Penn has died of heart failure. Penn started in television where he directed a critically-aclaimed adaptation of The Miracle Worker. Later, he would direct a film version with Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke in the leads. Of course, he's most famous for his work on Bonnie and Clyde, the 1967 gangster film that shocked audiences with its portrayal of violence. The film became a watershed moment in American cinema, paving the way for New Hollywood filmmakers like Coppola, Altman, Ashby, and many others. Penn made other notable films afterwards, such as Little Big Man, Night Moves, and Alice's Restaurant. In recent years, he returned to TV, producing some episodes of Law and Order. He is survived by his wife, two children,
See full article at FilmJunk »

Arthur Penn obituary

American director best known for Bonnie and Clyde, he focused on disillusioned outsiders

Arthur Penn, who has died aged 88, was one of the major figures of Us television, stage and film in the 1960s and 70s when the three disciplines actively encouraged experimentation, innovation and challenging subject matter. "I think the 1960s generation was a state of mind," he said, "and it's really the one I've been in since I was born." He will be best remembered for Bonnie and Clyde (1967), a complex and lyrical study of violent outsiders whose lives became the stuff of myth.

The film, starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, and based on the exploits of the bank-robbing Barrow Gang in the 1930s, became a cause celebre. It was praised and attacked for its distortion, bad taste and glorification of violence in equal measure. Newsweek's critic, Joseph Morgenstern, retracted his initial view of the film's violence,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bonnie and Clyde director Arthur Penn dies aged 88

Director of seminal crime movie and John F Kennedy's debate coach died at home of heart failure

Bonnie and Clyde famously bowed out in a hail of bullets, gunned down by police in what came billed as the bloodiest death scene in American movies. For the man who called the shots, behind the camera, the end was altogether more peaceful. Director Arthur Penn died quietly at home on Tuesday night, a day after his 88th birthday. His daughter said he died of congestive heart failure.

Born in Philadelphia, the younger brother of the photographer Irving Penn, the director galvanised the crime genre with his 1967 film starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway as the lovers on the run. It juggled the freewheeling flavour of the French New Wave with an explicit, stylised violence that was hitherto unknown in mainstream American cinema. Penn's playful, muscular style of directing would prove a major
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Arthur Penn, Director Of "Bonnie And Clyde", Dead At Age 88

  • CinemaRetro
Penn consults with Bonnie and Clyde stars Warren Beatty and Alexandra Stewart on the set of Mickey One. (Photo: Sam Falk/ NY Times)

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Arthur Penn, the acclaimed director of stage, TV and screen, has died at age 88. A low-key man not prone to publicity or bombast, Penn quietly changed the course of cinematic history with his direction of the ground-breaking 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde, which ushered in a New Wave of American cinema. Penn had already gained acclaimed through his work in the early days of TV. He directed the television adaptation of The Miracle Worker, as well as both the hit Broadway and big screen versions of the story. Penn also played a key role in American political history by advising John F. Kennedy how to prepare for his presidential debate against Richard Nixon in 1960. Most audiences who heard the debate on radio thought Nixon was the winner,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

'Bonnie and Clyde' director dies at 88

'Bonnie and Clyde' director dies at 88
Arthur Penn, the director of the polarizing "Bonnie and Clyde" whose films often flew in the face of American mythology, died Tuesday, one day after his 88th birthday.

Daughter Molly Penn said her father died of congestive heart failure at his Manhattan home. Longtime friend and business manager Evan Bell said Wednesday that Penn had been ill for about a year.

A product of the golden era of live television and an accomplished theater director, Penn's work on "The Miracle Worker" earned him an Emmy nomination in 1957, a Tony in 1959 and an Oscar nom in 1962. At one time, Penn had five hits running simultaneously on Broadway.

Penn was one of a group of directors -- including John Frankenheimer, Sidney Lumet and Norman Jewison -- whose films were intelligent glimpses into politics, morals and social institutions. Often, they were met with controversy.

His movies debunked the allure of the gunman, the
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Werner & Errol & the images in their caves

• Toronto Report #3

Werner Herzog and Errol Morris have been friends for a very long time, from the days in the 1970s when Morris saw Herzog's first films at the Univ. of Wisconsin and decided to become a filmmaker. Errol told Herzog of a film he wanted to shoot, but kept delaying. Herzog told him he needed more self-discipline. He added: "If you make this film, I'll eat my shoe."

That led to a famous evening at the Pacific Film archive in Berkeley, at which Herzog sat on the stage and did indeed eat his shoe. He was assisted in its preparation by the famous chef Alice Waters -- perhaps suggesting that you can find everything you don't want at Alice's Restaurant. The meal was the subject of a famous documentary by Les Blank titled "Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe."

On Sept. 13, 2010, Morris and Herzog both premiered their new films at
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

Timothy Olyphant: a law unto himself

He made his mark in the HBO western Deadwood. Now Timothy Olyphant is playing another lawman in the upcoming Justified

Timothy Olyphant is thinking about the Sex Pistols. "I was at an Arlo Guthrie show at UCLA last week," he says, rolling his eyes at the thought of the ancient singer of the hippy anthem Alice's Restaurant. "I just remember thinking, 'Man, if [former Pistols guitarist] Steve Jones was here he'd start booing,' and I really, really wanted to do the booing for him. Man, that show was a snore – I just didn't believe a word that came out of their mouths."

Punk credentials firmly established, Olyphant sips his latte, which has a perfect heart sculpted into its milky surface. The Steve Jones connection isn't so odd. For years, the ex-Pistol had the lunchtime spot ("Jonesey's Jukebox") on La radio station Indie 103.1. The show before that had Olyphant as its on-air, unpaid sports commentator.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Timothy Olyphant: a law unto himself

He made his mark in the HBO western Deadwood. Now Timothy Olyphant is playing another lawman in the upcoming Justified

Timothy Olyphant is thinking about the Sex Pistols. "I was at an Arlo Guthrie show at UCLA last week," he says, rolling his eyes at the thought of the ancient singer of the hippy anthem Alice's Restaurant. "I just remember thinking, 'Man, if [former Pistols guitarist] Steve Jones was here he'd start booing,' and I really, really wanted to do the booing for him. Man, that show was a snore – I just didn't believe a word that came out of their mouths."

Punk credentials firmly established, Olyphant sips his latte, which has a perfect heart sculpted into its milky surface. The Steve Jones connection isn't so odd. For years, the ex-Pistol had the lunchtime spot ("Jonesey's Jukebox") on La radio station Indie 103.1. The show before that had Olyphant as its on-air, unpaid sports commentator.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Dede Allen obituary

Innovative American film editor best known for her work on Bonnie and Clyde

Dede Allen, who has died after a stroke aged 86, not only broke into the predominantly male preserve of film editing, but developed a style and made innovations so distinctive that a school of editing was named in her honour. She was one of the great practitioners of movie-making.

Yet she worked rarely in Hollywood, did not achieve notable success until the age of 42, and despite receiving several Oscar nominations and the first solo onscreen credit for an editor at the beginning of a film, she was never well known. The job is highly technical and riddled with jargon, yet it is also an art, which is how Allen viewed it.

The film that made her name was Arthur Penn's 1967 hit, Bonnie and Clyde, about the doomed 1930s bank-robbing couple Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, played by Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Script shortcuts sure path to development hell

Script shortcuts sure path to development hell
My first screenwriting teacher at the Nyu film school was Patricia Cooper, who'd served as the highest female executive at a major studio at that time, overseeing big movies at Paramount in the '70s. She marched our class up to the Gulf & Western Building at Columbus Circle and sat us down in a screening room that resembled what I imagined a first-class airline compartment looked like, then showed us Francis Ford Coppola's "The Conversation."

As we gushed over it afterward, she praised the film but confessed to disappointment with the script. This was my first glimpse of major-league Hollywood story development.

My second teacher was Venable Herndon, co-author of Arthur Penn's "Alice's Restaurant." Venable's class was like some Reichian encounter group, but to get out of it in one piece, you didn't have to bare your primal wounds, only write a screenplay.

My third teacher was once-blacklisted Ian McLellan Hunter,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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