IMDb > Alice's Restaurant (1969)
Alice's Restaurant
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Alice's Restaurant (1969) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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6.3/10   2,867 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Arlo Guthrie (song)
Venable Herndon (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Alice's Restaurant on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
20 August 1969 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Where the heads of all nations meet See more »
Plot:
A cinematic adaption of Arlo Guthrie's classic song story. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
End of an era. See more (38 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Arlo Guthrie ... Arlo Guthrie
Patricia Quinn ... Alice Brock (as Pat Quinn)

James Broderick ... Ray Brock

Pete Seeger ... Himself
Lee Hays ... Himself - Reverend at Evangelical Meeting
Michael McClanathan ... Shelly
Geoff Outlaw ... Roger Crowther

Tina Chen ... Mari-chan
Kathleen Dabney ... Karin
William Obanhein ... Himself - Officer Obie
Seth Allen ... Evangelist
Monroe Arnold ... Blueglass
Joseph Boley ... Woody Guthrie
Vinnette Carroll ... Draft Clerk
Sylvia Davis ... Marjorie Guthrie
Simm Landres ... Private Jacob / Jake
Eulalie Noble ... Ruth
Louis Beachner ... Dean
MacIntyre Dixon ... 1st Deconsecration Minister
Arthur Pierce Middleton ... 2nd Deconsecration Minister (as Rev. Dr. Pierce Middleton)
Donald Marye ... Funeral Director
Shelley Plimpton ... Reenie

M. Emmet Walsh ... Group W Sergeant
Ron Weyand ... Cop #1 (as Ronald Weyand)
Eleanor D. Wilson ... Landlady (as Eleanor Wilson)

Neil Brooks Cunningham ... Medic (as Simon Deckard)
Thomas De Wolfe ... Waiter (as Thomas DeWolfe)
James Hannon ... Himself (as Judge James Hannon)
Graham Jarvis ... Music Teacher
John E. Quill ... Cop #2 (as John Quill)
Frank Simpson ... Sergeant
Alice Brock ... Suzy
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Directed by
Arthur Penn 
 
Writing credits
Arlo Guthrie (song The Alice's Restaurant Massacree)

Venable Herndon (screenplay) and
Arthur Penn (screenplay)

Produced by
Hillard Elkins .... producer
Harold Leventhal .... associate producer
Joseph Manduke .... producer (as Joe Manduke)
 
Original Music by
Arlo Guthrie 
 
Cinematography by
Michael Nebbia 
 
Film Editing by
Dede Allen 
 
Production Design by
Warren Clymer 
 
Set Decoration by
John Mortensen 
 
Costume Design by
Anna Hill Johnstone 
 
Makeup Department
Irving Buchman .... makeup artist
Phil Naso .... hair stylist (as Philip Naso)
 
Production Management
Willard W. Goodman .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
William C. Gerrity .... first assistant director (as William Gerrity Jr.)
Frank Simpson .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Shelly Bartolini .... scenic artist (as Shelley Bartolini)
Merle Eckert .... chief carpenter
Thomas Wright .... property master
Robert Hart .... construction coordinator (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jack Fitzstephens .... sound editor
Sanford Rackow .... sound editor
Abe Seidman .... sound mixer
Dick Vorisek .... sound re-recordist (as Richard Vorisek)
Stephen Fitzstephens .... foley artist (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Milton Olshin .... process projection
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Morton Gorowitz .... gaffer
Victor J. Kemper .... camera operator (as Victor Kemper)
Charles Kolb .... key grip
Muky .... still photographer (as "Muky")
Joseph Di Pasquale .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
George Newman .... wardrobe supervisor
Marilyn Putnam .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Editorial Department
Gerald B. Greenberg .... associate film editor (as Gerald Greenberg)
Richard Marks .... assistant editor
Stephen A. Rotter .... assistant editor (as Stephen Rotter)
 
Music Department
Fred Hellerman .... musical director
Garry Sherman .... composer: additional music
Garry Sherman .... music arranger
Garry Sherman .... music supervisor
 
Other crew
Ed Bowes .... assistant to production
Wayne Fitzgerald .... title designer
Rhona Kane .... unit publicist
Diane Katz .... production secretary
Gene Lasko .... production associate
Bill Liberman .... assistant to production
Florence Nerlinger .... assistant to producer
Barbara Rittenberg .... script supervisor
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
111 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M | Finland:K-8 | Sweden:11 | USA:R (original rating) | USA:GP (edited for re-rating) (1970) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The real Alice Brock and Ray Brock appear as extras in the film. In the scene where "Ray" is putting up insulation, she is wearing a brown turtleneck and has her hair in a ponytail. In the Thanksgiving scene she wears a bright pink satin blouse. In the party scene she's wearing a Western-style dress.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Throughout most of the scenes in the movie the length of Arlo's hair keeps changing lengths. In one scene Arlo's hair is long to his shoulders and in the next scene is hair is short to his collar, vice versa.See more »
Quotes:
Criminal:[approaching Arlo on the bench] Kid, what'd you get?
Arlo Guthrie:I didn't get nothin'. I had to pay fifty dollars, and pick up the garbage.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Car-Car SongSee more »

FAQ

Is Alice's restaurant a real place?
Are the lyrics to the song 'Alice's Restaurant' available online?
Who performed 'Songs to Aging Children Come' in the burial scene?
See more »
82 out of 100 people found the following review useful.
End of an era., 14 July 2003
Author: jt1999 from Santa Monica

As most students of 1960s filmmaking are aware, "Alice's Restaurant" was director Arthur Penn's unsuccessful follow-up to "Bonnie and Clyde." It was based on -- or rather inspired by -- a good idea: Arlo Guthrie's famous autobiographical song, which told the humorous and ironic tale of two run-ins with the "establishment," as we used to say, during a Thanksgiving in Stockbridge, Mass., and a subsequent draft board examination in New York City.

Thirty-three long years later, seeing this cultural artifact from the late '60s is less like watching a story unfold than stepping into a time machine. The good, bad and tragic aspects of that turbulent era are all represented here, and the past -- as observed from our tainted and narcissistic age of SUVs, AIDS and the Internet -- seems positively innocent. And -- with a few obvious exceptions -- idyllic.

The 1960s may have been a tumultuous era, but those years embodied one crucial concept sorely missing from today's society: youthful idealism. Way back when -- before a six-figure salary became the college student's holy grail, when saving the world was more important than earning a law degree -- young people were actually passionate -- about freedom, about peace, about the long- term prospects for humanity. If that passion has not completely vanished, it has certainly been redirected -- and not, in my view, toward a positive or productive end.

Whether Penn's film works or not as a cinematic adaptation of Guthrie's song, whether it successfully mixes deadpan humor (hippies vs. bureaucratic clods) with tragedy (the dark side of drug use) seems almost irrelevant now. The movie succeeds in capturing a remarkable moment in time, a short period when the future may have been uncertain, but there was still a brilliant ray of sunshine at the end of the tunnel -- and a youthful force propelling us toward it.

The hippie movement may have been naive, but it was a movement nonetheless, and a positive form of rebellion. As seen in the film, young people often used the word "peace" instead of "goodbye" -- not just as a pleasant sentiment at the end of a conversation, but as a serious reminder of what was important -- that nothing was more vital than global, harmonious accord, to "live as one." That spirit may have died with John Lennon; it may have left this Earth with Jerry Garcia. In any case, it's pretty much gone now, and already -- except, perhaps, within a few small, nostalgic circles -- nearly forgotten.

Today, the concepts of "peace" and "love" seem hopelessly quaint. The era of Flower Power has long since passed, and most young people would readily agree that All You Need is Cash -- the majority of them knowing infinitely more about money markets than peaceful coexistence. Teenagers who once joined together to enjoy music, freedom and a sense of community (Woodstock) have been replaced by a disenfranchised generation who angrily rape, steal and burn (Woodstock '99). Somewhere along the line, the hopeful enthusiasm of folk music and rock'n'roll gave way to the fury of punk, rap and hip-hop. Freeform artistic expression (Prog-Rock, Pop Art, tie-died clothes, experimental filmmaking) was discarded in favor of nihilism and self-mutilation (Industrial/ Goth-Rock, Heavy Metal, piercings and tattoos). The ray of hope faded. "Make Love, Not War" degenerated into "Show Us Your Tits." The "us" decade ('60s) became the "me" decade ('70s). And now -- God help us -- we are firmly entrenched in what surely would've made the founding fathers wish they'd never been born: the"whatever" century.

This apathetic new millenium has ushered in not a glorious Odyssey of space exploration or a Brave New World of modern medicine -- but terrorism, fear, ignorance and intolerance. Politically, Ashcroft's medical marijuana raids and "President" Bush's environmental atrocities likely cause even die-hard liberals to fondly recall the days of Tricky Dick! Who could have ever imagined?!

And so "Alice's Restaurant" is another tragic arrow through our empty, modern- day heart -- a damning reminder of just how low this country has sunk, how far a nation of bloodless, soulless opportunists has strayed from the garden. Think of it! Once, this country poured its life blood into electing leaders who would end war and famine; now, we waste millions trying to impeach them for receiving blow jobs.

Jim Morrison was 35 years ahead of his time. The '60s -- in retrospect -- was the beginning. And this, now, is the end.

Peace.

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Anybody know what happened to Patricia Quinn? dfgrayb
One of 1000 Greatest Films. Why? SeanOBackHair
Movie about Co-dependence nuazwildcats
Private Jacob/Jake is NOT played by Simms Landres bbmksbys
Just watched it. cyberjoshy
how it was first reported in the newspaper EJF
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