Watch Now

on Amazon Video

WATCH NOW
ON TV
ON DISC
ALL
On a special inner city street, the inhabitants, both human and puppet, teach preschool subjects with comedy, cartoons, games and songs.
Reviews
Popularity
939 ( 50)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



48   47   46   45   44   43   … See all »
2018   2017   2016   2015   … See all »
Won 6 Primetime Emmys. Another 202 wins & 288 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

The Muppet Show (1976–1981)
Comedy | Family | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

Kermit the Frog and his friends struggle to put on a weekly variety show.

Stars: Jim Henson, Frank Oz, Richard Hunt
Fraggle Rock (1983–1987)
Animation | Adventure | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

The adventures of the various inhabitants of an underground civilization.

Stars: Karen Prell, Gerard Parkes, Kathryn Mullen
Oobi (2003–2005)
Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

A curious young hand puppet named Oobi encourages logical thinking. Along with his little sister Uma, best friend Kako and grandfather Grampu, Oobi discovers the outside world in a new way each day.

Stars: Tim Lagasse, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Noel MacNeal
Muppets Tonight (1996–1998)
Comedy | Family | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

Kermit the Frog, Clifford and friends struggle to put on a weekly TV variety show.

Stars: Dave Goelz, Kevin Clash, Jerry Nelson
Adventure | Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Big Bird is sent to live far from Sesame Street by a pesky social worker. Unhappy, Big Bird runs away from his foster home, prompting the rest of the Sesame Street gang to go on a cross-country journey to find him.

Director: Ken Kwapis
Stars: Caroll Spinney, Jim Henson, Frank Oz
Family | Fantasy | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  

Fred Rogers explores various topics for young viewers through presentations and music both in his world and in the Neighborhood of Make-Believe.

Stars: Fred Rogers, Betty Aberlin, David Newell
Adventure | Comedy | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

A tug-of-war between Elmo and his friend sends his blanket to faraway Grouchland, a place full of grouchy creatures and the villainous Huxley. Elmo embarks on a rescue mission, learning important lessons about sharing and responsibility.

Director: Gary Halvorson
Stars: Kevin Clash, Mandy Patinkin, Vanessa Williams
Schoolhouse Rock! (1973–2009)
Animation | Family | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

A series of shorts illustrating various songs that teach multiplication tables, grammar, science, American history, computers, economics, and environmentalism.

Stars: Jack Sheldon, Essra Mohawk, Darrell Stern
Reading Rainbow (TV Series 1983)
Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

Levar Burton introduces young viewers to illustrated readings of children's literature and explores their related subjects.

Stars: LeVar Burton, Jennifer Betit Yen, Arnold Stang
Adventure | Comedy | Crime
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Kermit, Gonzo and Fozzie are reporters who travel to Britain to interview a rich victim of jewel thieves and help her along with her secretary, Miss Piggy.

Director: Jim Henson
Stars: Jim Henson, Frank Oz, Dave Goelz
Adventure | Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Kermit and his friends go to New York to get their musical on Broadway only to find it's a more difficult task than they anticipated.

Director: Frank Oz
Stars: Jim Henson, Frank Oz, Dave Goelz
Comedy | Family | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.7/10 X  

Big Bird worries when Oscar tells him that if Santa Claus can't fit down the chimney on Christmas Eve, nobody would get presents.

Director: Jon Stone
Stars: Jim Henson, Frank Oz, Jerry Nelson
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
...
...
...
...
Martin P. Robinson ...
...
...
Bob McGrath ...
...
...
...
Fran Brill ...
...
Loretta Long ...
Edit

Storyline

The setting is in a small street in a city where children and furry puppet monsters learn about numbers, the alphabet and other pre-school subjects taught in commercial spots, songs and games. Written by Kenneth Chisholm <kchishol@execulink.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-Y | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

Release Date:

21 July 1969 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

1-2-3 Sesame  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

|

Sound Mix:

|

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Some classic Muppets have been canned for interesting reasons. Don Music, the piano player who would bang his head against the piano in frustration, was discontinued when kids at home started doing the same thing. Harvey Kneeslapper's signature laugh was too much of a strain on Frank Oz's vocal cords. Roosevelt Franklin was considered a negative cultural stereotype; he was the only African American Muppet at the time, and was mostly seen in detention after school. Professor Hastings, a teacher whose lectures were so dull that he'd fall asleep while he was giving them, was discontinued because he was too dull. Some of these segments continued to air on the Canadian version for some time after they were removed from the US show. See more »

Goofs

During the "Remembering Game" sketch, when Cookie Monster calls "Number 4", a stagehand's arm is visible reaching behind the game board at the bottom right of the screen. See more »

Quotes

The Announcer: We interrupt this presentation to bring you "A message from your local chicken!"
Gordon Robinson: Hey, Zelda! You're on!
Zelda the Chicken: [Clucking]
Zelda the Chicken: [Translating] For those of you who don't speak chicken, Zelda says that she is mighty proud to be a chicken!
Zelda the Chicken: [Clucking]
Gordon Robinson: [Translating] She is proud because chickens lay eggs,
Zelda the Chicken: [Clucking]
Gordon Robinson: [Translating] And eggs are good for you.
Zelda the Chicken: [Clucking]
Gordon Robinson: [Translating] She is also proud that she is covered with feathers that keeps him warn in the winter and hoot in the...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

Most episodes aired from 1969 to the 2000s do not have complete closing credits; ending credits usually appeared at the end of the Friday installment, or when another weekday episode ran short. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Deconstructing Harry (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

I Wonder 'Bout the World Up There
Written by Donald Alan Siegal
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

A childhood gem, but it has fallen in standards since I was a lad...
13 November 2004 | by (Southern Hemisphere) – See all my reviews

When I was a child, there were two main educational programs shown to children. Play School, being the other one, basically got me shouting at the television that I was not retarded, not stupid, and not a diminished human being, just a child. From what I've seen from observing some of my cousins' children, it hasn't changed a lot except parents have revised their opinion of its suitability for five year olds. Unfortunately, Sesame Street is going much in the same direction.

In the 1990s, Sesame Street had a rather nasty competitor in the shape of Barney, a purple dinosaur with a support cast that showed no difference in emotional response. Even when that support cast consisted of four year olds and fourteen year olds. As if that wasn't harmful enough, Barney would openly tell children they weren't good if they didn't have good feelings, or alter the rules of a game to make someone else the winner. That such "lessons" were allowed to be broadcast shows how useful the regulators of television really are. By contrast, the Sesame Street I remember even dealt with such issues as the death of a loved one. Goodbye, Mr. Hooper was one of the most amazing episodes of children's television ever broadcast because it made an effort to try and teach children about something so difficult that even live adults are often no help with it.

Other brilliant aspects of the show included using monsters to portray certain feelings or behaviours that the audience might be conflicted about. They had a cookie monster to show what a negative (but highly funny, the way they presented it) appearance gluttony can bring. They had a grouchy monster to show the effects of an anti-social mentality. More "cute" monsters such as Grover were used to show things like fear or sadness. There was a good reason for all of this. Negative feelings are difficult enough for a child to understand, so having puppets to thoroughly explain them was very educational.

Kudos are also due the adult cast of the show. During every episode I saw, even Goodbye, Mr. Hooper, the adults were never condescending or smug. They never acted as if they had every answer. Instead, they told the monster, other puppet, or child characters a few useful tidbits and let these characters work things out for themselves. Even today, if you see the sequences with such annoying characters as Elmo, it is the children or the child-like characters who deliver all the answer lines. Those consultations with child psychologists done by the Children's Television Workshop really paid off.

Unfortunately, and there always seems to be an unfortunately these days when it comes to children's television, a certain adherence to marketing over education crept in over recent years. The greatness of such characters as Oscar or Grover was that they could appeal to children without needing to be cutesy. Oscar was a grump who appeared to have worked too many night shifts, while Grover seemed to be just a fearful but friendly guy trying to make his way in the world. Perfectly normal, ordinary people wrapped up in some very bizarre-looking trimmings, in other words. Nowadays, characters like Elmo seem so awfully sugarcoated that it makes me wonder if his audience is going to encounter problems in later life when they learn they cannot get by simply on acting cute.

I don't know who pulls the strings on this show these days, but I would like to implore them for the sake of future generations. The old way of educating the children about the fundamentals of life, and letting the cute factor take care of itself, was a much better one. Please go back to it. I might not be part of the audience anymore, but I do have second cousins, and maybe one day a niece or nephew, who are.


51 of 55 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page