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70 years ago today: Mickey Mouse welcomed BBC back to the airwaves after World War II

  • Hitfix
70 years ago today: Mickey Mouse welcomed BBC back to the airwaves after World War II
70 years ago today, Mickey Mouse welcomed BBC back to the airwaves for the first time after World War II. The television service had been shut down for nearly seven years when broadcasting ceased during the war. The 1933 cartoon Mickey’s Gala Premier was the final program broadcast on BBC on September 1, 1939 before it went off the air, and it was the first program transmitted when BBC was back in 1946. The cartoon chronicles Hollywood celebrities joining Mickey and Minnie at Grumman’s Chinese Theatre for the premiere of a new Mickey Mouse movie. Other notable June 7 happenings in pop culture history: • 1955: The game show The $64,000 Question premiered on CBS. It became one of the shows involved in the 1950s quiz show scandal. • 1963: The Rolling Stones’ first single, a cover of Chuck Berry’s “Come On,” was released. • 1969: The Johnny Cash Show premiered on ABC. • 1969: At the 22nd Primetime Emmy Awards,
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What do below-the-line Emmy nominations tell us about Best Comedy Series contenders?

What do below-the-line Emmy nominations tell us about Best Comedy Series contenders?
Emmy pundits knew “Modern Family” instantly lost its frontrunner status to win a record sixth Best Comedy Series trophy when nominations were announced because it had been snubbed for both Best Writing and Directing (it is ranked third in our odds). No comedy has won the top race without contending in at least one of these categories since “Friends” in 2002. Prior to that, you have to go back “My World and Welcome to It” in 1970 when there were only three slots each for Best Writing and Best Directing then, not five to six as there are now. -Break- recognition from the editors’ branch of the TV academy is instrumental to winning a top Emmy. Indeed, since the intro...
See full article at Gold Derby »

Link o' the Morning To You

Film Society NYC's annual Asian Film Festival starts at the end of the month and will pay tribute to Jimmy Wong Yu (Taiwanese director), Lee Jung-jae (Korean actor), and Sandra Ng (Hong Kong actress) among others. Lots of interesting sounding films as usual

TMZ a few dozen images from the set of Star Wars Episode VII - mostly it's just charactor actors mulling about Tattooine sets with dark sunglasses in those earth colors heavy robes. Don't get too excited.

Mnpp Good morning Jamie Dornan. This new photoshoot seems to be taking over the web (but I am willing to predict that 50 Shades of Gray won't do justice to Dornan's smolder.

La Times Ann B Davis, "Alice" the housekeeper from The Brady Bunch has passed away. She was already a two-time Emmy winner when she started that show in 1969 but can you believe The Brady Bunch was never nominated for a single Emmy?
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty (2013) – The Review

The last time busy Hollywood triple threat Ben Stiller (actor, writer, director) stepped behind the camera was way, waaaay back in 2008 for the Summer satirical comedy smash Tropic Thunder. So what work has inspired him to return to film making this winter? Why it’s a short story from James Thurber, himself something of a multiple threat (author, playwright, cartoonist) who passed away over fifty years ago. Now his work did make to the big and small screen during (and soon after) his lifetime. The Male Animal was a starring vehicle in the 40′s for Henry Fonda. His story “A Unicorn in the Garden” became an acclaimed Upa animated short subject in the 1950′s. And in 1970 his writings and drawings were the inspiration for an NBC sitcom in 1970 called “My World and Welcome to It” (a gem that lasted barely one season). Two years later those same works also inspired
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Where Are the Laughs? A Farewell to Live Audiences and Laugh Tracks

By Jason Rothberg

Contributor

* * *

Before laughter started pouring out of our TV sets from live studio audiences and pre-recorded laugh tracks, there were claquers. Claquers were members of an organized group of professional audience members, called a claque, who were paid by theatre and opera owners to attend performances and sweeten the reception of whatever was playing. By the 1830s, a theatre manager could order a certain number of claquers to attend a performance, with some being hired to lead applause, others to laugh at jokes, and some to hold handkerchiefs to their eyes and summon fake tears. Why would a theatre owner pay people to react as they deem appropriate? For the same reason we’ve had live audiences and laugh tracks projecting laughter into our homes from I Love Lucy to The Big Bang Theory: because laughter can be infectious.

Up until the late 1950s, the laughter
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Emmys fun facts and trivia: Best Comedy Series

Emmys fun facts and trivia: Best Comedy Series
Modern Family” has won this award for the last three years in a row. The only show to claim Best Comedy Series for four consecutive years was “Frasier” (1994-1998), which actually triumphed five times. Besides “Modern Family,” the only other ABC program to win Best Comedy Series multiple times was “Taxi” (1979-1981). The only laffer in the past four decades to win this top Emmy without a directing or writing nomination was “Friends” (2002). Before that, it was “My World and Welcome To It” (1970). This year “The Big Bang Theory” and “Veep” are the only contenders without directing or writing nominations. “30 Rock” won the last of its three consecutive Best Comedy Series Emmys in 2009. Shows that won this category and then had to wait at least three years before another win were “All in the Family” (won in 1974, then in 1978) and “Ch...
See full article at Gold Derby »

It’s Not TV: HBO, The Company That Changed Television: The Wasteland

The Wasteland:

Television is a gold goose that lays scrambled eggs;

and it is futile and probably fatal to beat it for not laying caviar.

Lee Loevinger

When people argue over the quality of television programming, both sides — it’s addictive crap v. underappreciated populist art — seem to forget one of the essentials about commercial TV. By definition, it is not a public service. It is not commercial TV’s job to enlighten, inform, educate, elevate, inspire, or offer insight. Frankly, it’s not even commercial TV’s job to entertain. Bottom line: its purpose is simply to deliver as many sets of eyes to advertisers as possible. As it happens, it tends to do this by offering various forms of entertainment, and occasionally by offering content that does enlighten, inform, etc., but a cynic would make the point that if TV could do the same job televising fish aimlessly swimming around an aquarium,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Whitney Houston, Jennie Rivera and more of 2012's Gone but Not Forgotten

As a new year dawns, a tribute to those we've lost in the year now ending is merited ... and in 2012, those sad milestones have encompassed some of the most popular personalities in television history.

Andy Griffith: The actor-producer who put Mayberry on the map forever will be remembered as one of television's most genial personalities, also extending to his run as wily lawyer Matlock.

Dick Clark: The number of music stars who owe at least part of their success to the "American Bandstand" maestro is incalculable. Thanks to him, people also enjoy "New Year's Rockin' Eve," receive American Music Awards and have a greater appreciation of bloopers. Here's a "so long" salute to you, Dick.

Larry Hagman: The truly unfortunate irony of the veteran actor's recent death is that he was just starting his second round of "Dallas" success as master schemer J.R. Ewing. He'll also
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

William Windom obituary

American TV and film actor whose repertoire ran from Shakespeare to Star Trek

It may well be that the American actor William Windom, who has died aged 88 of congestive heart failure, appeared as a guest star in more TV series than anyone else in the history of the medium. While quantity is not necessarily an adjunct of quality, Windom made it so.

The character actor's career on television spanned seven decades, from his debut as a fiery Tybalt in a Philco Television Playhouse production of Romeo and Juliet (1949) to an episode of Star Trek: New Voyages (2004) in which he recreated the role of the unbalanced Commodore Matt Decker. Decker was first seen in one of the series's best chapters, The Doomsday Machine (1967), and it was enough to sanctify Windom in the eyes of Trekkies. The role had been written for Robert Ryan, but Windom's powerful portrayal made any possible comparisons redundant.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

William Windom obituary

American TV and film actor whose repertoire ran from Shakespeare to Star Trek

It may well be that the American actor William Windom, who has died aged 88 of congestive heart failure, appeared as a guest star in more TV series than anyone else in the history of the medium. While quantity is not necessarily an adjunct of quality, Windom made it so.

The character actor's career on television spanned seven decades, from his debut as a fiery Tybalt in a Philco Television Playhouse production of Romeo and Juliet (1949) to an episode of Star Trek: New Voyages (2004) in which he recreated the role of the unbalanced Commodore Matt Decker. Decker was first seen in one of the series's best chapters, The Doomsday Machine (1967), and it was enough to sanctify Windom in the eyes of Trekkies. The role had been written for Robert Ryan, but Windom's powerful portrayal made any possible comparisons redundant.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Actor William Windom Dies At 88

Actor William Windom Dies At 88
Los Angeles -- William Windom, who won an Emmy Award for his turn in the 1969 TV comedy series "My World And Welcome To It" and went on to score guest appearances on several popular shows, has died.

Windom died Thursday of congestive heart failure at his home in Woodacre, north of San Francisco, his wife Patricia told the Los Angeles Times. He was 88.

Windom won acclaim in the short-lived NBC series for his role as John Monroe, a writer-cartoonist for a New York magazine who relied on his fantasy life to escape a middle-class Connecticut life.

The series was based on the work of the humorist James Thurber and Windom went on to develop a one-man touring act inspired by the same whimsical Americana.

Born in New York City on Sept. 28, 1923, Windom was named after his great-grandfather, a Minnesota congressman and former U.S. Treasury secretary. He attended Williams College
See full article at Huffington Post »

Emmy-Winning Actor William Windom Dead at 88

Emmy-Winning Actor William Windom Dead at 88
Emmy Winner William Windom passed away at his home in Woodacre, California last Thursday, his wife Patricia confirms. The 88-year-old actor died of congestive heart failure.

Related: Sherman Hemsley Cause of Death Revealed

In addition to numerous appearances in film and TV, the actor is best known for playing Star Trek's Commodore Matt Decker, Murder She Wrote's Dr. Seth Hazlitt, and multiple memorable roles on the Rod Sterling series, The Twilight Zone.

Windom won an Emmy in 1970 for best actor in a comedy series in for his performance in My World and Welcome to It, based on author James Thurber's essays and cartoons.

The actor is survived by his four children and wife of 37 years.
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Emmy Winner William Windom Dead at 88

Emmy Winner William Windom Dead at 88
Rest in peace, William Windom. The television actor, who received an Emmy Award for his work in My World and Welcome to It and is well-known for his roles on Star Trek and Murder, She Wrote, died in his California home from congestive heart failure on Thursday, according to the New York Times. Windom was 88. During his early years, Windom joined the army and served as a paratrooper in World War II. He later attended the University of Kentucky, among several other higher-education institutions, and decided to pursue acting. Windom also appeared on episodes of The Twilight Zone and the '60s comedy series The Farmer's Daughter, where he played a Minnesota congressman, a position served...
See full article at E! Online »

William Windom, Emmy-Winning TV Actor, Dead at 88

  • The Wrap
William Windom, Emmy-Winning TV Actor, Dead at 88
William Windom, a 1970 Emmy Award winner for his show "My World and Welcome to It," died on Thursday at home in Woodacre, Calif. He was 88. The cause of death was congestive heart failure, his wife Patricia told the New York Times. Also read: Notable Celebrity Deaths of 2012 NBC's "My World and Welcome to It" was based on James Thurber's humorous essays and cartoons, and Windom later toured with a one-man show drawn from the program. He may have been at least as well known for his numerous guest appearances on several
See full article at The Wrap »

'Walter Mitty' Comes to Life With Ben Stiller

It looks like The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is finally about to be reimagined, with Ben Stiller in the lead. And you know what? This could be very good. Or it could be very bad.

"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" is a short story, written by James Thurber in 1939. It's a well-observed little character piece about an unrepentant day dreamer whose wild fantasies are inspired by his humdrum daily life. In 1947, it was turned into a rather precious film, starring Danny Kaye, which changed the story drastically, taking Thurber's quite little gem and making it a ridiculous Technicolor adventure yarn that showcased Kaye's considerable physical comedy chops though had little to do with Thurber. This is what I fear is about to happen again.

Walter Mitty has been making the rounds for a while. All the usual suspects have shown interest in the project, including actors Owen Wilson,
See full article at Planet Fury »

Jane After Dark: Ally McBeal, season one

  • Aol TV.
It's always interesting when you've been hearing about a series for years and then finally sit down to watch it. All the little pieces and pop references of Ally McBeal are starting to come together, like Fishisms, The Biscuit, dancing babies and Vonda Shepard. I have seen the light. Well, at least season one of the light.

I mentioned in my preview last week that Ally McBeal seems like a mix of The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd and My World and Welcome To It. Having reached the end of season one, I still feel that way, with maybe a little Buffy the Vampire Slayer thrown in (hey, don't throw things at me, Ally looks like Buffy).

Molly Dodd because Ally is funny, desperate, strong and cute. My World because of all her fantasies, though not always in cartoon form as was the case with John Monroe / James Thurber.
See full article at Aol TV. »

Jane After Dark preview: Hooked on Ally McBeal

  • Aol TV.
I'm watching season one of Ally McBeal for Jane After Dark this week, and will give a full review this weekend. But I have to say, I'm just a few episodes in, and I'm already hooked. It's a weird blend of The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd and My World and Welcome To It.

And it's very weird seeing Calista Flockhart, whom I mainly know from Brothers & Sisters, and all of her co-stars, whom I know from other current shows, on Ally McBeal. What's even more amazing is all of the musicians featured on this show: Elton John, Tina Turner, Mariah Carey, Al Green, and many more.

Continue reading Jane After Dark preview: Hooked on Ally McBeal

 

Filed under: Other Drama Shows, Programming, TV on DVD, OpEd, Video, Music and Variety, Reality-Free, Jane After Dark

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