Daytime, primetime, then late-night talk and variety show. Often there was only one guest (GA Gov. Lester Maddox walked out angrily during one interview). Cavett was intelligent and witty, ... See full summary »
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7   6   5   4   3   2   1   Unknown  
1974   1973   1972   1971   1970   1969   … See all »
Won 3 Primetime Emmys. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host (271 episodes, 1968-1974)
Bobby Rosengarden ...
 Himself - Bandleader (214 episodes, 1968-1974)
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Storyline

Daytime, primetime, then late-night talk and variety show. Often there was only one guest (GA Gov. Lester Maddox walked out angrily during one interview). Cavett was intelligent and witty, perhaps too much so for television. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

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Music | Talk-Show

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Release Date:

4 March 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dick Cavett Show  »

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4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Joni Mitchell was forced to choose between appearing on this show, which was her first national television appearance, and appearing at Woodstock. Her manager forced her to appear on this show when he saw how bad the traffic was going to and from the site. However, the night of her appearance, several of the acts who appeared at Woodstock, including Jefferson Airplane, David Crosby and Stephen Stills showed up unannounced while she was being interviewed and gave their first-hand accounts of what it was like at the festival. See more »

Connections

Featured in Forrest Gump (1994) See more »

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Non Comic Relief
28 November 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

THE WELL KNOWN species of television show known as the Late Night talk & variety show has long been a regular feature of network television. It started with something called Broadway OPEN HOUSE (1950-51), which ran on the NBC Television Network. It was directly ancestral to THE TONIGHT SHOW, which made it the forefather and prototype for all that was to follow. (BROADWAY OPEN HOUSE was hosted by comic Jerry Lester.)

THE HOSTING OF such fare in the late night programming instinctively was given to the funnymen. The comedians made the near perfect host as they would do the opening monologue and some occasional comic sketches, while in between introducing talk-oriented guests, singers and new talent comics. Consequently we had the likes of Steve Allen, Jack Parr, Johnny Carson, David Letterman, Jay Leno, Conan O'Brien and (briefly) Pat Sajak.

BUT WHERE THERE is a rule, one also will find an exception. In the case of the late night talk show genre, we nominate Dick Cavett as our candidate.

ALTHOUGH POSSESSED OF an enormous supply of wit, Mr. Cavett cannot be called a comedian by any stretch of the imagination. His obvious high degree of intelligence and natural ability as an interviewer make a strong case for classifying him as an "intellectual." Small and slight of build, his personality and fine use of the Queen's English made him a giant of a personality.

ALTHOUGH HE DID a brief monologue at the opening of his show, he was no comedian (as we've already said), he sang no songs and played no musical instruments, he absolutely commanded his audience. His real strength did lie in his talent in the interview.

THE ONE INCIDENT that we witnessed (on the tube) was an interview that he did. The subject was a most obnoxious Norman Mailer. Conducting the interview, Cavett had some notes written on a small sheet of paper.

WHILE MOVING ON from one question to another, Mailer made a smug, snide and very patronizing remark, "Just read it off of your little piece of paper!" ROARING BACK AS if he were a cornered tiger, Letterman shot back, "Why don't you fold it five ways and put it where the moon don't shine!"


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