The Benny Hill Show (1969) - News Poster

(1969–1989)

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Unintentionally Phallic Bread Loaf Sends ‘Great British Bake Off’ Judges Into Giggle Fits

  • ET Canada
British television has long been home to naughty sexual innuendo (as seen in classic Britcom “Are You Being Served?” and “The Benny Hill Show”), but who knew this also extended to TV baking competitions? Apparently so, which became clear in a recent episode of “The Great British Bake Off” that had viewers busting their guts, […]
See full article at ET Canada »

Blast-Off

An admiring nod to ’60s dream siren Daliah Lavi! American-International leaps into an epic Jules Verne comedy about a trip to the moon, a good-looking but slow and unfunny farce that must squeak by on the goodwill of its cast of comedians. Burl Ives is excellent casting as P.T. Barnum, promoting a Greatest Show Off the Earth.

Blast-Off

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1967 / Color/ 2:35 widescreen / 119 99, 95 min. / Street Date March 21, 2017 / Those Fantastic Flying Fools; Jules Verne’s Rocket to the Moon / available through Olive Films / 29.95

Starring: Burl Ives, Terry-Thomas, Gert Fröbe, Lionel Jeffries, Troy Donahue, Daliah Lavi, Dennis Price, Hermione Gingold, Jimmy Clitheroe, Graham Stark, Edward de Souza, Judy Cornwell, Allan Cuthbertson, Sinéd Cusack, Maurice Denham.

Cinematography: Reginald H. Wyer

Film Editor: Ann Chegwidden

Original Music: John Scott

Written by Dave Freeman, Peter Welbeck (Harry Allan Towers) inspired by the writings of Jules Verne

Produced by Harry Allan Towers

Directed by Don Sharp
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

DVD Review – Helga, She Wolf of Stilberg (1978)

Helga, She Wolf of Stilberg, 1978.

Directed by Patrice Rhomm.

Starring Patrizia Gori, Malisa Longo, Richard Allan, Dominique Aveline, and Jacques Marbeuf.

Synopsis:

A sadistic female prison warden’s latest inmate is the daughter of her government’s political enemy.

The second release from new imprint label Maison Rouge, Helga, She Wolf of Stilberg is a French title that veers a bit close to Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS, possibly the best and certainly one of the most infamous Naziploitation movies to have crawled its way out of the prison slop tray. But while for all intents and purposes Helga, She Wolf of Stilberg is a straight lift of the Ilsa movies it does hold back on some of the grimier traits of those films, which makes it at once both a little easier to watch and also frustratingly bland in places when it could have been a whole lot more.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: ‘ClownTown’

Film Review: ‘ClownTown’
ClownTown” opens with the by now almost inevitable (and just as predictably meaningless) claim that it is “inspired by true events.” Actually, there have been some real-life events of late fit to inspire a horror film of this particular stripe: Multiple communities along the East Coast have reported scary-clown sightings at the edge of forests and in other isolated areas. The phenom has been understandably ominous to local residents, and widespread enough to attract national media attention. Authorities’ failure thus far to apprehend any perps has raised suspicions that the whole thing might be a publicity stunt — perhaps for Rob Zombie’s imminent killer-clown-athon “31,” some speculate.

However that creepy current cultural footnote resolves itself, the very thought of suddenly spying some Insane Clown Posse wannabe lurking on the far side of a parking lot or empty schoolyard is more chilling than anything in “ClownTown.” This regional slasher offers nothing recognizably based on a “true event,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doctor Who series 9: geeky spots in The Girl Who Died

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Eye-patches, a yo-yo, Game Of Thrones and Benny Hill. Here are the geeky bits and pieces we noticed in Doctor Who's The Girl Who Died...

While Ashildr watches the centuries pass waiting until her paths cross with the Doctor again, here’s something she might want to read to the pass the time - it’s the fifth of our geekly, weekly viewing guides to the ninth series of Doctor Who, pulling together all of the references and callbacks, recurring themes and motifs, and tenuous connections that we thought were interesting enough to write about anyway.

As always, if you spot something that we haven’t, please do share it with us in the comments below - so far, you’ve proved that we have some impressively eagle-eyed readers out there! And remember - it’s just a bit of fun...

Norse Mythology

This isn’t
See full article at Den of Geek »

Compelling, seductive horror: have you been watching Penny Dreadful?

With the introduction of Helen McCrory as a bewitching villain, a gripping romance and a new accent for Billie Piper, the undead gothic mystery has found a new lease of life

The first series of Penny Dreadful was a bloody mess. No surprise there, you might say. What else is a spooky, sensational Victoriana drama about a possibly-possessed medium, an Quartermain-ish adventurer, an American gun-for-hire who’s secretly a werewolf, and Dr Frankenstein and his many monsters going to be? Throw in a legion of vampires pursuing and being pursued by our heroes – it alternated between chasing and being chased, a bit like the end credits of The Benny Hill Show – and it’s not exactly a recipe for Downton Abbey.

So, we had blood and guts, slicing and dicing, vampires chained up in basements, corpses reanimated and then ripped in half, sub-Exorcist demonic mutterings that French and Saunders
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

DVD Review – For Men Only (1968)

For Men Only, 1968.

Directed by Pete Walker.

Starring David Kernan, Andrea Allan, Derek Aylward, Tom Gill, Mai Bacon, Apple Brook, Neville Whiting, Britt Hampshire.

Synopsis:

A London fashion journalist promises his girlfriend he won’t work with sexy young women anymore and takes a job with a magazine group keen on moral reform, unaware that the chief executive is also publishing a ‘men only’ magazine.

In the 1970s, British director Pete Walker became something of a cult favourite by helming such notable exploitation classics as House of Whipcord and Frightmare, as well as ending his directorial career with the Cushing/Lee/Price/Carradine ensemble piece House of the Long Shadows in 1983, and in the process became the closest thing we Brits had to a John Carpenter or a Wes Craven. But before that period of his career Walker made a string of sex comedies, the first of which was the 1968 short film For Men Only.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Sex Tape review: Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel have an iPad mishap

Sex Tape review: Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel have an iPad mishap
Director: Jake Kasdan; Screenwriters: Kate Angelo, Jason Segel, Nicholas Stoller; Starring: Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel, Rob Corddry, Ellie Kemper, Rob Lowe; Running time: 94 mins; Certificate: 15

Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel get themselves into a rather tricky position in Sex Tape, in more ways than one. The two bounced off each other pretty well in Bad Teacher and apparently, that was enough to convince director Jake Kasdan to throw them together again and cut loose with some cheeky nudity and a naughty premise and the end result is a flabby, largely unfunny comedy. Awkward...

Right away, the couple are seen getting up close and very personal, but those were the good old days fondly recalled by Annie (Diaz) who now writes a parenting blog between chores, sleep and sexual frustration. Her now-husband Jay (Segel) has resorted to booking appointments for possible nookie and when they do find the time, it's all friction and no sparks.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Video: Dolly Parton's 'Yakety Sax' Performance Will Make Your Day

Video: Dolly Parton's 'Yakety Sax' Performance Will Make Your Day
Ok, you should probably just get ready to call it a day. Go ahead and pull your car keys out of your pocket and move your cursor toward the 'shut down' prompt on your computer screen, because this video is going to be the high point of today, if not your life: After you've watched Dolly Parton play "Yakety Sax" on a tiny rhinestone-encrusted saxophone, there's literally nothing left for you to accomplish. "I was feeling rather saxy today," the 68-year-old singer told the massive crowd at the Glastonbury Music Festival on Sunday. "I wanted to do something to impress you.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Dolly Parton Playing ‘Yakety Sax’ Is the Best Thing There Is

  • Vulture
Dolly Parton Playing ‘Yakety Sax’ Is the Best Thing There Is
How’s your day going? Don’t worry, it’s about to get better. This is a video of Dolly Parton playing “Yakety Sax.” Really. It’s not a dub. It’s not a drill. As she explains, she learned it after watching The Benny Hill Show. So, when she was asked to play England’s Glastonbury Festival, she knew she had to bust it out. Seriously, why are you still reading these words? Go watch Dolly Parton play “Yakety Sax.”
See full article at Vulture »

'22 Jump Street': 10 pop-culture references you might have missed (and three you wish you had)

'22 Jump Street': 10 pop-culture references you might have missed (and three you wish you had)
No doubt fans of 21 Jump Street recognized plenty of callbacks and self-deprecating cracks made by Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum in the über-meta sequel 22 Jump Street. From a running gag about how sequels are more expensive versions of the exact same thing (including undercover partners Schmidt and Jenko’s high-tech new HQ, which Jenko describes as cool “as a Cube of Ice”) to the line “F— you, doves!” (surely a throwback to the first installment’s fan-favorite line “F— you, science!”), the movie was chockablock with them.

That said, judging from some conspicuous moments of silence during gags at the
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Happy Birthday Benny Hill! Here Are 4 Classic Movie Scenes Improved With “Yakety Sax”

For many people of a certain age, The Benny Hill Show was our first introduction to slapstick … and boobs. And slapstick boobs. The Thames show ran for over 30 years in England, and in The States, could usually be seen late Friday or Saturday nights.

The comedy was of a “different era,” meaning it was sexist and objectified women, but oddly, it was inoffensive and in a way, there was an innocence about it. The most popular part of every Benny Hill Show was the final segment, in which he would be chased by various characters, usually buxom and/or angry women, to the tune of Boots Randolph‘s “Yakety Sax.”

Benny died in 1992, but today would have been his 90th birthday, so I decided to pay tribute by picking four famous movie scenes and giving them the Benny Hill treatment. Take a look and tell me these scenes aren’t
See full article at The Backlot »

“Sherlock” Recap: “Not. Dead. But For How Long?”

Last week on Sherlock – oh no hold on excuse me, this is that one show that two years ago some maniacs at the BBC decided to take a little break from even though everyone has been screaming into the void about it for twenty-four months? Ah yes, countless human beings have been born and begun to crawl since we last watched Sherlock, but the wait is over at long last! Get your “How He Survived” notebooks out and let’s begin!

We’re starting off just great here with the dark outline of John Watson reflected on the shiniest gravestone the sobbing eyes of fangirls have ever seen. We are treated to a version of the double-suicide upon the roof top of St. Bart’s that appears to be the result of your two year old child (you know, the one you birthed and raised since the show went on
See full article at The Backlot »

Pat Ashton obituary

My mother Pat Ashton, who has died aged 82, was an actor for over four decades. Probably her most important TV role was that of Annie, wife of a burglar (Bob Hoskins) who comes out of prison to find that his old friend (John Thaw) has moved in, in Thick As Thieves (1974). When Yorkshire TV declined a second series, the writers Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais took the idea to the BBC, where it was developed into the much-loved series Porridge.

Pat was born and raised in Wood Green, north London. During her early years, the piano was the focus of entertainment at home, with her brother Richard playing all the popular songs of the day. Her grandmother had been a trapeze artist, performing in front of the tsar in Russia, and Pat quickly became fascinated with music hall, learned to tap-dance from an early age and went on to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Pat Ashton obituary

My mother Pat Ashton, who has died aged 82, was an actor for over four decades. Probably her most important TV role was that of Annie, wife of a burglar (Bob Hoskins) who comes out of prison to find that his old friend (John Thaw) has moved in, in Thick As Thieves (1974). When Yorkshire TV declined a second series, the writers Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais took the idea to the BBC, where it was developed into the much-loved series Porridge.

Pat was born and raised in Wood Green, north London. During her early years, the piano was the focus of entertainment at home, with her brother Richard playing all the popular songs of the day. Her grandmother had been a trapeze artist, performing in front of the tsar in Russia, and Pat quickly became fascinated with music hall, learned to tap-dance from an early age and went on to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Olvia Newton-John's Sister Loses Battle With Brain Cancer

Olvia Newton-John's Sister Loses Battle With Brain Cancer
Olivia Newton-John's older sister, Rona, has died. The 70-year-old model and actress was diagnosed with brain cancer last month.

Olivia revealed Rona passed away on Friday, May 24 in Los Angeles, Calif., in a Facebook post Wednesday.

My beautiful sister Rona sadly passed on May 24th in Los Angeles. It was May 25th in Australia - which was our mother Irene's birthday. Rona died of a very aggressive brain tumor and mercifully suffered no pain. She was surrounded by the love of her four children - Fiona, Brett,Tottie and Emerson and, her wonderful friends. I will miss her forever - my beautiful, smart, talented, funny, brave sister Rona.

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked donations be sent to the Olivia Newton-John Cancer & Wellness Centre. A brain tumor fund will be set up in Rona's memory and the funds will go to helping people battling the disease.

In April,
See full article at Huffington Post »

'Are You Being Served' Actor Dies At Age 92

'Are You Being Served' Actor Dies At Age 92
London — British actor Frank Thornton – best known as Captain Peacock in the hit television comedy "Are You Being Served?" – has died at age 92.

The actor's agent, David Daly, said Monday that Thornton died in his sleep in his home in London in the early hours of Saturday.

Thornton is best remembered by British audiences for his comic role in the innuendo-laden sitcom "Are You Being Served?" The show ran from the 1970s to 1985.

He appeared on "The Benny Hill Show" in the early days of his acting career, and later also became known for his part in the television series "Last of the Summer Wine." He also made an appearance in the movie "Gosford Park."

He is survived by his wife Beryl, daughter Jane, and three grandchildren.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Celebrate The Diamond Jubilee With A&E And The Crown Jewels Of Comedy Giveaway

Everyone has their eye on the Diamond Jubilee, and I have a giveaway for you to help celebrate with A&E Home Video‘s Crown Jewels of Comedy. One lucky winner will take home a megabundle of Britain’s best comedy. Take a look at what you’ll be getting below, and enter to win.

DVD sets in the bundle-

Benny Hill: The Complete Megaset – The Thames Years 1969-1989

The undisputed “Funniest Man on Television” Benny Hill pioneered a naughty new direction for the sketch-comedy variety show and pushed TV broadcasting to new levels of rowdiness as he electrified audiences all over the world with The Benny Hill Show. This show-stopping collection on 18 DVDs captures every classic comedic moment from the Merry Master of Mirth in his hey day!

Benny Hill: The Complete Megaset™ contains Benny’s raucous 20-year reign over television’s-sketch variety genre, from the naughty
See full article at AreYouScreening »

V for Vendetta: Reading the film

Alan Moore harboured a special resentment towards the film version, which did serious injustices to his graphic novel

The film of V for Vendetta carries the following credit line: "Based on the graphic novel illustrated by David Lloyd." Alan Moore's name is nowhere to be seen. There's nothing unusual in that. Moore has disassociated himself from all Hollywood product, explaining: "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen was the reason why I decided to take my name off all subsequent films."

Few who have seen League of Extraordinary Gentlemen would want to argue with that. But even though his refusal to have his name on the credits is part of a general policy, Moore seems to harbour a special resentment towards the Joel Silver and Wachowski brothers production of V for Vendetta. As the New York Times wrote at the time of its release:

"To him, the movie adaptation of V for Vendetta
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Doctor Who complete reviews: The Stolen Earth

The critics can advise you on what's good and what's bad in all aspects of life – whether it's TV, music, films or food – but at the end of the day, it's the public view that counts. A TV critic can pick apart a really bad programme until the cows come home, but if the public likes it, who cares? How else could you explain the long-running My Family – Aka, the most depressing, mean-spirited excuse for a comedy in the history of telly – a programme that seems to be derided by every critic under the sun, and yet seems to have lasted for decades. See? If the public likes something, then a critic's job sometimes feels a bit pointless.

Still, as I weep into my computer keyboard, at least I can console myself with the fact that My Family's limping to its well deserved end this year. As for Doctor Who,
See full article at Shadowlocked »
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