6.1/10
1,525
52 user 23 critic

Wild in the Streets (1968)

R | | Comedy, Drama, Music | 29 May 1968 (USA)
A young man gains significant political influence as the leader of a counterculture rock band with his rallying cry of voting rights for teenagers.

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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Daphne Flatow
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Max Frost
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Sally LeRoy
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Senator Johnny Fergus
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Mary Fergus
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Stanley X
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Max Jacob Flatow, Sr.
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Billy Cage
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The Hook
May Ishihara ...
Fuji Elly
Salli Sachse ...
Hippie Mother
Kellie Flanagan ...
Mary Fergus
Don Wyndham ...
Joseph Fergus
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Jimmy Fergus
...
Senator Amos Allbright
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Storyline

Wealthy twenty-two year old Max Frost - born Max Jacob Flatow, Jr. - is a rock music superstar, he a rock music franchise unto himself. He has cut ties with his parents, especially due to the control wielded by his overbearing mother, Daphne Flatow, that control against which he rebelled and is still rebelling in the form of having an entourage solely of young people, who he believes knows better than people even a few years older than them. Age-wise, the senior member of his entourage is his acid-dropping girlfriend, former child star Sally LeRoy, age twenty-four, the junior member being fifteen year old Yale law graduate Billy Cage, his business advisor and his band's guitarist. Max decides to endorse thirty-seven year old Congressman Johnny Fergus, running on the Democratic ticket for a California senate seat, as one of Johnny's platform policies is to lower the voting age to eighteen. Johnny happily accepts that endorsement because of Max's power over young people, whose votes ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

This is the story of Max Frost, 24 years old...President of the United States...who created the world in his own image. To him, 30 is over the hill. 52% of the nation is under 25...and they've got the power. That's how he became President...it's perhaps the most unusual motion picture you will ever see! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for drug content | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 May 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

De unge ta'r magten  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Ryder Sound Services)

Color:

(Pathecolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"The Shape of Things to Come", written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, was a #22 chart hit for Max Frost and the Troopers (a "studio group", made up of session musicians) in 1968. In 2006, it was featured in commercials for Target Stores. See more »

Goofs

When Jimmy Fergus meets his Senator father, he states "and when that special water comes in...". The decision to put LSD in the water supply is made in the scene following during Max's War Council so Jimmy's scene with his father was edited out of sync. See more »

Quotes

Fuji Elly: [asks Mary Fergus] Hey! How often can you do it at eighty?
[Mary Fergus looks away without a word]
Max Jacob Flatow Jr alias Frost: Whatever Papa can do, Baby Boy can do it more times, better.
[raises his eyebrows]
See more »

Connections

Featured in Brady Bunch Home Movies (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Wild In the Streets
Written by Les Baxter and Guy Hemric
Performed by Jerry Howard
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User Reviews

 
Really radically far-out!!!!
9 September 1999 | by (Sacramento, CA) – See all my reviews

Very much in and of its time. But outrageously good nonetheless. I truly enjoyed the acting by everybody involved--particularly Christopher Jones, Shelley Winters, Diane Varsi, Ed Begley, Sr., Hal Holbrook AND Richard Pryor.

Also a significant key to the film was the music of the legendary songwriting duo of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, featuring what was, in my estimation, very unsung (excuse the pun) gems which rank right up with ALL their

classics. Just as the recent political satire, "Bulworth", spoke to its times (which are still very much current, by the way), this movie does exactly the same thing.

The clear-cut divisions of generationalism are clearly conspicuous in this film. This movie captured the spirited groove of the late '60s when youth was roaring loudly and taking a stand against the establishment.

For anyone looking for a outrageous take of some of the events of the time, coupled with a hard, aching, laugh-out-loud reaction, this is as great a place as any to go.


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