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Wild in the Streets (1968)

 -  Drama | Sci-Fi  -  29 May 1968 (USA)
6.1
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Ratings: 6.1/10 from 1,164 users  
Reviews: 45 user | 11 critic

Max Flatow is a precocious, social miscreant who has a way with home-made explosives. When he tires of these, he runs away from home only to emerge seven years later as Max Frost, the ... See full summary »

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Title: Wild in the Streets (1968)

Wild in the Streets (1968) on IMDb 6.1/10

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Mrs. Daphne Flatow
Christopher Jones ...
Max Jacob 'Frost' Flatow Jr.
...
Sally LeRoy
...
Senator Johnny Fergus
...
Mary Fergus
...
Stanley X
...
Max Jacob Flatow Sr.
Kevin Coughlin ...
Billy Cage
...
The Hook, Abraham
Michael Margotta ...
Jimmy Fergus
...
Senator Allbright
May Ishihara ...
Fuji Elly
Salli Sachse ...
Hippie Mother
Kellie Flanagan ...
Young Mary Fergus
Don Wyndham ...
Joseph Fergus
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Storyline

Max Flatow is a precocious, social miscreant who has a way with home-made explosives. When he tires of these, he runs away from home only to emerge seven years later as Max Frost, the world's most popular entertainer. When Congressman John Fergus uses Frost as a political ploy to gain the youth vote in his run for the Senate, Frost wills himself into the system, gaining new rights for the young. Eventually, Frost runs for the presidency. Winning in a landslide, he issues his first presidential edict: All oldsters are required to live in "retirement homes" where they are forced to ingest LSD, taking the 60s catch phrase "Never trust anyone over 30" to its most extreme consequences. Written by Rick Gregory <rag.apa@email.apa.org>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

This is the story of Max Frost, 24 years old...President of the United States...who created the world in his own image. To him, 30 is over the hill. 52% of the nation is under 25...and they've got the power. That's how he became President...it's perhaps the most unusual motion picture you will ever see! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sci-Fi

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for drug content | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 May 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Wild in the Streets  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Ryder Sound Services)

Color:

(Pathecolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Christopher Jones' singing was dubbed by Harley Hatcher (aka Paul Wibier). See more »

Quotes

Max Jacob Flatow Jr alias Frost: How old do you think I am?
Young Mary Fergus: About a hundred.
Max Jacob Flatow Jr alias Frost: I'm 24.
Young Mary Fergus: That's old.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Brady Bunch Home Movies (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Wild In the Streets
Written by Les Baxter and Guy Hemric
Performed by Jerry Howard
See more »

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User Reviews

 
is it wrong to read this (if only in retrospect) as a jaded satire on youth culture and politics?
29 March 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I was curious to read some reviews of Wild in the Streets from when it was released (i.e. Ebert's) to get an idea of what the movie was thought of at the time. There was a good line that nails what is probably at the core of the film, which is "the fascist potential of pop music," but it can be taken a step further to what the fascistic potential is of anyone who appeals to a section of the culture that can be galvanized. The movie wasn't well received- it was, granted, an AIP picture dumped on the masses as a hippie exploitation flick along the likes of Psych-Out- but now in looking back I wonder if the writer, Robert Thom (also responsible for the cult classic Death Race 2000) and director Barry Shear (mostly a TV director) were much ahead of their own audience. It skewers the old and politicians, yes, but it also skewers pop music and LSD and hedonism and even communism to a certain extent. It's a fun, absurdist nightmare 'trip' on what would happen if the "kids" took over, which leads eventually to the question: what happens when they're too old.

Four sentence summary: Christopher Jones plays Max Frost, a pop star who had one of those shaky childhoods that led to a lot of acid and blowing up his parent's car. His band, a bunch of Monkeeys rip-offs (yes, that's right), are filled with a bunch of who's whos, like a 15 year old super-genius account and a black anthropologist played by Richard Pryor. At a political rally for a "youth" senator (Hal Holbrook) who wants the voting age lowered to 18, he comes up off the bat with a rallying song, "14 or fight" to lower the voting age to 14! And then everything soon spirals into a youth-controlled congress and presidency (think Mr. Smith Goes to Washington with over-ecstatic flower children), with all the "old" pulled into camps where they're doped on acid and given frocks to wear.

Trippy, man, trippy. Contrary to what some have said, and perhaps I read more into it than was necessary or warranted, Wild in the Streets takes a hold of its principal subjects as something that is meant to be mocked mercilessly. While nowhere near the brilliance of Network, it does have the same kind of super jaded view of humanity below the surface. Everything becomes so exaggerated that the only conceivable way to take it is as a satire; if it is meant as a "serious" look at politics and the youth culture then only a few moments stand out (actually the "Shape of Things" song is ironically powerful in the context of where it comes which is right after a few students are shot at a rally - a foreshadowing to Kent State?), but on its terms of it being a nutty but oddly lucid spoof on the political scene then it works really well.

If for nothing else the cast is a hoot: Shelley Winters hams it up as the star's mother who in one scene literally crashes through security gates to get to her son who really doesn't want anything to do with her, especially after she basically kills a kid with a car! Also big props to Hal Holbrook who takes the quasi William Holdon in Network role (the one "serious" guy amid the chaos) and Ed Begley as a crusty old politico who quickly gets run out to the old-folk farm singing in circles. Along with Pryor look out for Larry Bishop and Millie Perkins. It's not high art, but Wild in the Streets has some scenes that are excruciatingly funny (I was dying during the 25 year old "chick" speaking to congress about lowering all ages to run for office to 14), and there's even some good pointers made about the state of the nation. It's exploi-satire, baby!


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