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Len Wein, Wolverine and Swamp Thing Co-Creator, Passes Away at 69

  • MovieWeb
Len Wein, Wolverine and Swamp Thing Co-Creator, Passes Away at 69
The comic book and movie industry is in mourning today after one of the great writers has passed away. Len Wein, who co-created the Wolverine for Marvel, Swamp Thing for DC Comics and many more, passed away today at the age of 69. No exact cause of death was given at this time, and it remains unclear when more official details will be released. Here's what fellow comic book writer Brian Michael Bendis had to say on social media about Len Wein.

"Len Wein, co-creator of Wolverine and Swamp Thing & more responsible for the x-men you love than he gets credit for. Thank you. #Rip. Btw he was Very kind to me when i first started at marvel. Encouraging and shiny. Sadly, Not all his peers are. He was inspiring."

The statement on Brian Michael Bendis Twitter did not reveal a cause of death and it is unclear if there will
See full article at MovieWeb »

Review: "8 Million Ways To Die" (1986) Starring Jeff Bridges And Rosanna Arquette; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Stories about troubled cops or ex-cops still have a foothold in movies and TV shows -- almost to the point where you wonder why so these emotionally vulnerable men and women chose a stressful career in law enforcement in the first place. Private eyes, on the other hand, are almost an extinct species on the screen, after great media popularity in the 1950s and intermittent periods of audience demand since then. Maybe, as fantasy figures who embody power, personal integrity, and social conscience, trenchcoated PIs have been displaced and replaced by superheroes. The hero of Hal Ashby’s “8 Million Ways to Die” (1986), Matt Scudder (Jeff Bridges), begins as a policeman but becomes an unlicensed, free-lance gumshoe in the course of the story. A detective with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office, Scudder serves a warrant on a suspected drug trafficker in the opening scenes of the film.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Criterion Reflections – Shame (1968) – Fs

  • CriterionCast
David’s Quick Take for the Tl;Dr Media Consumer:

Shame is Ingmar Bergman’s “war movie,” a disclosure that already feels to me like I said too much, since I went into this one knowing next to nothing about it and was therefore all the more pleasantly stunned and staggered by the discovery. So if you haven’t yet watched it, stop reading now, and go do so right away, or at least before you proceed much further in reading here. It’s an excellent film and in my opinion, yet another marvelous, essential “must see” entry into Bergman’s canon. (Other critics, and even the director, don’t share my assessment; I’ll address that below.) But for those who’ve seen it, I have to figure they can agree with my surprise at the inclusion of screaming fighter jets, exploding grenades, dead paratroopers hanging from branches, machine gun blasts,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Reflections – Spirits of the Dead (1968) – Fs

  • CriterionCast
David’s Quick Take for the Tl;Dr Media Consumer:

The resume is solid and the references check out: Federico Fellini, Louis Malle, Roger Vadim each shouldering a directorial third of the project, with talented crews working at their behest to create visually elegant environments to support the stories they tell. Top shelf recruits from leading “beautiful people” actors of their generation: Brigitte Bardot. Alain Delon. Jane Fonda. Peter Fonda. And then there’s Terence Stamp, probably less renowned than the preceding quartet, is roguishly seductive as a disheveled blond wastrel with a suicidal bent. Source material drawn and freely adapted from short stories by Edgar Allan Poe. Ray Charles contributes to the soundtrack. A goosebump inducing first person Pov midnight dash through the streets and alleyways of Rome in a vintage 1964 Ferrari Lmb Fantuzzi just adds extra sprinkles on top. Though the overall impact of the film makes it
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Reflections – Genocide (1968) – Es 37

  • CriterionCast
David’s Quick Take for the Tl;Dr Media Consumer:

Genocide is the fourth and final title included in Eclipse Series 37: When Horror Came to Shochiku, a box set containing the sum total of a short lived experiment that the fabled Japanese studio conducted in the late 1960s. For a movie that doesn’t feature any giant monsters stomping on buildings or blasting victims with exploding laser beams, it otherwise manages to tick off just about every other item associated with Japanese post-apocalyptic sci-fi horror disaster cliches of its era:

a solemn moralistic condemnation of militarized atomic weaponry that both opens and closes the film in a book-ending framework the valiant effort of a few ordinary heroes who bravely put their lives at risk in order to save humanity from its self-inflicted demise involvement of hostile aliens who determine that humans are unworthy to survive after squandering the opportunity
See full article at CriterionCast »

Daguerrotype | 2016 Toronto Int. Film Festival Review

  • ioncinema
Spirits of the Dead: Kurosawa Continues Ghostly Leitmotifs in First French Language Film

Japanese auteur Kiyoshi Kurosawa makes a surprise venture into French language cinema with the intriguingly titled Daguerrotype (which is a better fit than its original English language moniker, The Woman in the Silver Plate, but in French is known as La Secret de la chamber noire, which is something more like The Secret of the Dark Room).

Continue reading...
See full article at ioncinema »

Odessa Young short film ‘Highway’ to screen at the BFI London Film Festival

  • IF.com.au
Australian short film Highway, written and directed by Vanessa Gazy, produced by Tim Russell and Michael Wark and starring the swiftly-rising Odessa Young, will premiere at the BFI London Film Festival next month.

Highway is Gazy.s second major short following her Aftrs film Foal, which was nominated for Adg and Awg awards in 2015 and is currently screening onboard certain Virgin flights.

Leading lady Young was singled out by critics for her performances in Simon Stone's The Daughter and Sue Brooks' Looking for Grace. In Highway, she plays troubled teen Hester Black, who is hitchhiking on an eerie mountain pass when her radio begins to receive phantom news signals from the future bearing very bad news.

.We are truly thrilled to have been selected for the BFI London Film Festival," said Gazy. "It is a great honour to be given the opportunity to showcase our little piece of
See full article at IF.com.au »

Australian short film ‘Highway’ to screen at the BFI London Film Festival

  • IF.com.au
Australian short film Highway, written and directed by Vanessa Gazy, produced by Tim Russell and Michael Wark and starring the swiftly-rising Odessa Young, will premiere at the BFI London Film Festival next month.

Highway is Gazy.s second major short film following on from her award-winning Aftrs short film Foal, which was nominated for Adg and Awg awards in 2015 and is currently screening onboard certain Virgin flights.

Leading lady Young was singled out by critics for her performances in Simon Stone's The Daughter and Sue Brooks' Looking for Grace. In Highway, she plays troubled teen Hester Black, who is hitchhiking on an eerie mountain pass when her radio begins to receive phantom news signals from the future bearing very bad news.

.We are truly thrilled to have been selected for the BFI London Film Festival," said Gazy. "It is a great honour to be given the opportunity to
See full article at IF.com.au »

Round-Up: Deadpool Items, The Abandoned Release Details, Free Unotld Comic, Dark Horse’s Fcbd 2016

  • DailyDead
Deadpool is having a great year, and it is going to get even better in 2016. Funko will release several new Deadpool items starting in January. Also: release details for The Abandoned, a look at the comic Home #2: Thicker Than Water, and Free Comic Book Day details.

Deadpool Items: From Funko: "The Merc with a Mouth makes his triumphant return to vinyl, plush, and beyond!

Pop! Marvel: Deadpool

Both sides of Deadpool's personality shine through in our two latest Pop! figures!

Two Swords Deadpool is ready for battle and Thumbs Up Deadpool is ready for chimichangas!

Coming in January!

Pop! Home: Marvel - Deadpool Mug

Finally! You can now drink directly out of Deadpool's head!

Coming in February!

Mopeez: Marvel - Deadpool

The newest Mopeez line showcases one of Deadpool's favorite things: himself!

He comes in four versions; classic red, X-Force gray,

the blue suit from his X-Men days, and the inverse yellow suit!
See full article at DailyDead »

200 Greatest Horror Films (80-71)

  • SoundOnSight
Special Mention: Spirits Of The Dead (Histoires extraordinaires)

Written and directed by Federico Fellini (segment “Toby Dammit”), Louis Malle (segment “William Wilson”), Roger Vadim (segment “Metzengerstein”)

France, 1968

The first thing you should notice is the three directors: Federico Fellini, Louis Malle, and Roger Vadim. Secondly, take notice of the cast, which includes Brigitte Bardot, Jane Fonda, Peter Fonda, Alain Delon, Terence Stamp, Salvo Randone, James Robertson Justice, Françoise Prévost and Marlène Alexandre. Spirits Of The Dead is an adaptation of three Edgar Allan Poe stories, one of which demands to be seen.

The first segment of the film, Vadim’s “Metzgengerstein”, is unfortunately the least impressive, but is still great in its own right, and features a marvelous performance by Jane Fonda. Malle’s segment, which is the second of the three, turns Edgar Allan Poe’s 1839 story into an engrossing study in cruelty and sadism. This episode is an engaging enough entry,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Interview with Tales Of Halloween’s John Skipp and Andrew Kasch

  • DailyDead
To celebrate the October 16th release of the horror anthology Tales of Halloween, Daily Dead spoke to the filmmakers behind the movie to discuss the project, their individual contributions, and more.

The only directing duo contributing to Tales of Halloween, John Skipp (writer of A Nightmare on Elm Street 5) and Andrew Kasch (Never Sleep Again: The Elm Street Legacy) have a lot to say about making a movie with their friends and the current state of horror. Their segment, “This Means War,” about a pair of neighbors feuding over Halloween decorations, deals with this very subject.

One of the things I love about Tales of Halloween is that so many of the segments deal with different aspects of the holiday. Yours tackles Halloween decorations... sort of. Where did the inspiration for your short, "This Means War", come from?

Andrew Kasch: Halloween haunts are my jam! Each year, I hit
See full article at DailyDead »

China’s Bona Film Doubles Profits in First Quarter

China’s Bona Film Doubles Profits in First Quarter
Bona Film Group saw net profits reach $4.9 million in the first quarter, outpacing revenues, which doubled to $118 million. The performance was driven by the blockbuster success of “Man From Macau II,” which was the biggest hit in China over the key Chinese New Year period.

“Macau II” grossed RMB974 million. Other films distributed by Bona in the quarter included “The Grandmaster 3D” earning RMB62.9 million “Tales of Mystery,” which earned RMB7.6 million and “Emperor’s Holidays” for RMB114.4 million. Including holdovers of “The Taking of Tiger Mountain” Bona enjoyed gross theatrical revenue of RMB1.6 billion from January to end of March.

Films currently in production include “The Phantom of Shanghai” (previously “The Shadow of the Devil City”), “Sword Master,” “Secret Treasure.” Ang Lee’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” in which Bona is a partner alongside Studio 8 and TriStar, began shooting in April.

“We expect the Chinese film industry
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Greatest Horror Anthology Film Segments of All Time

  • SoundOnSight
Popular in the 1960s and early 1970s with more rare appearances in the 1980s, 1990s and the 2000s, the anthology-style horror film has made a solid resurgence in recent years with such portmanteau releases as The ABCs of Death films and the V/H/S series.

With Mexico Barbaro, Fear Paris and other projects in various stages of completion, the anthology horror film looks to continue to be an important part of the horror cinema landscape.

Some anthology films employ a framing or wraparound sequence in an attempt to connect the segments that make up the film while others dispense with this classic Amicus-style approach entirely and simply present a collection of short films connected by genre.

Either way, a horror anthology film is ultimately about the quality of its individual segments and this article will take you on a tour of the greatest horror anthology segments of all time.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: Federico Fellini’s Playful Yet Nightmarish Edgar Allen Poe Short Film 'Toby Dammit'

  • The Playlist
If you even wondered what it would look like if one of the greatest auteurs in film history directed an episode of “Tales From The Crypt," look no further than Federico Fellini’s absurdist short “Toby Dammit,” based on a relatively obscure Edgar Allen Poe story titled “Never Bet The Devil Your Head." The quickest way to describe “Toby Dammit” would be as “8½ in Hell." Firmly planted in Fellini’s late '60s narcissistically colorful, exuberant dream-reality period, “Toby Dammit” represented one-third of an anthology feature consisting of three Poe adaptations from three of the most revered filmmakers at the time: Fellini, Louis Malle, and Roger Vadim (perhaps “tolerated” instead of “revered” is a better description for Vadim). The feature is called “Spirits of the Dead,” and even though Fellini received a considerable amount of praise for his segment, the other two shorts failed to impress. Eventually, critics and audiences discarded.
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: Federico Fellini's Edgar Allan Poe Short 'Toby Dammit'

Watch: Federico Fellini's Edgar Allan Poe Short 'Toby Dammit'
Loosely inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's 1841 story "Never Bet the Devil Your Head," "Toby Dammit" was part of "Spirits of the Dead," a collage of films by Fellini, Louis Malle and Roger Vadim. Flasy and ostentatious as ever, this was Fellini's short film follow-up to "Juliet of the Spirits," and it has that film's lurid stylishness. Sexy Terence Stamp (not-so-sexy and actually quite dead-looking here) plays a boozy former Shakespearian actor in meltdown mode who sells his soul to the devil a la "Doctor Faustus." But here he's driving around the Rome cityscape in a Ferrari, having creepy visions of Satan in the form of a creepy blonde child. Nina Rota, of course, provides the groovy score.  Thanks to Open Culture for the generous share.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Beneath The Monster: Chatting with Sara Karloff

Beneath The Monster: Chatting with Sara Karloff
Interview and photo by Michael Lizarraga.

When Lon Chaney Sr. drove by a tall, thin contract actor waiting for a bus one night in the pouring rain, the famous movie star did more than just offer this unassuming Englishman a ride home; he gave his passenger some acting tips that would forever change his life: “Find something that no one else is doing or willing to do, and do it better than anyone else; leave your mark.”

The unassuming passenger, of course, was Boris Karloff.

From its 1910 screen debut to the recent I, Frankenstein and upcoming Whale/Karloff remake, Mary Shelley’s “man playing God” tale has cinematically endured for over a century, largely due to the “quarterback” and “maestro” of all monsters, Boris Karloff. Twice inscribed on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, twice featured on the U.S. stamp, his voice heard every Christmas throughout millions of homes, Karloff
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Raymond Benson And Jeffery Deaver "Ice Cold" Book Launch Party, New York City, April 29

  • CinemaRetro
Author and Cinema Retro columnist Raymond Benson has collaborated with bestselling author Jeffery Deaver on "Ice Cold: Tales of Mystery and Intrigue From the Cold War", a new book that presents a topic both men know well: espionage. In addition to stories by Benson and Deaver, there are contributions from many other talented writers who specialize in thrillers. The book is winning rave advance reviews (click here).  Both Deaver and Benson have won acclaim for writing original James Bond novels. 

Benson and Deaver, along with other noted authors,  will be in New York City for a book launch event at the famed Mysterious Bookshop on April 29 at 6:00 Pm. The store is located at 58 Warren Street in Tribeca.

Cinema Retro Editor-in-Chief Lee Pfeiffer, who will be at the event, said, "We're very excited by Raymond's new project. He's been with Cinema Retro since our first issue ten years ago
See full article at CinemaRetro »

31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: Top 100

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time for one reason: the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. I am including documentaries, short films and mini series, only as special mentions – along with a few features that can qualify as horror, but barely do.

Come Back Tonight To See My List Of The 200 Best!

****

Special Mention:

Wait until Dark

Directed by Terence Young

Written by Robert Carrington

USA, 1967

Directed by Terence Young,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Terence Stamp: The Hollywood Interview

Terence Stamp Finds His Song

By Alex Simon

One of the iconic actors and faces of London’s “swinging” sixties; Terence Stamp was discovered by actor/director Peter Ustinov for the titular role in his adaptation of Melville’s “Billy Budd” in 1962. The Cockney lad from London’s notorious Bow district was thrust into the limelight almost overnight, becoming a symbol of the English working class “intelligentsia,” which helped shape that decade’s pop culture. Along with game-changers like Joe Orton, (Stamp’s former roommate) Michael Caine, and the Beatles, Stamp et al proved to the world that one needn’t have graduated with a First from Oxford to make a mark on the world.

Terence Stamp marked his 50th year in show business with the release of last year’s “Unfinished Song,” being released today on DVD and Amazon Instant Video by Anchor Bay Entertainment. Stamp plays grumpy pensioner Arthur Harris,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

100 + Greatest Horror Movies (Pt. 2): 124-101

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

124: (Tie) Inside (À l’intérieur)

Directed by Alexandre Bustillo and Julien Maury

Written by Alexandre Bustillo

2007, France

Four months after the death of her husband, a pregnant woman is tormented by a strange woman who invades her home with the intent on killing her and taking her unborn baby. This movie is not recommended for women on the brink of motherhood. Inside is one of the most vicious and
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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