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The Shoes of the Fisherman
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The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968/I) More at IMDbPro »

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The Shoes of the Fisherman -- Set in a futuristic vision of the late 1980's, Ukrainian Archbishop Kiril Lakota is set free after two decades as a political prisoner in Siberia...

Overview

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7.1/10   2,257 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
John Patrick (screenplay) and
James Kennaway (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Shoes of the Fisherman on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 November 1968 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Set in a futuristic vision of the late 1980's, Ukrainian Archbishop Kiril Lakota is set free after two decades as a political prisoner in Siberia... See more » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(4 articles)
Calvary – The Review
 (From WeAreMovieGeeks.com. 14 August 2014, 1:54 PM, PDT)

Popes on Film
 (From Alt Film Guide. 29 April 2013, 2:15 PM, PDT)

R.I.P. Jaroslav “Jerry” Gebr
 (From Deadline TV. 21 March 2013, 12:50 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
An Ukrainian Catholic bishop is elected Pope and tries to prevent WWIII. See more (42 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Anthony Quinn ... Kiril Lakota

Laurence Olivier ... Piotr Ilyich Kamenev (as Sir Laurence Olivier)

Oskar Werner ... Fr. David Telemond

David Janssen ... George Faber

Vittorio De Sica ... Cardinal Rinaldi

Leo McKern ... Cardinal Leone

John Gielgud ... The Elder Pope (as Sir John Gielgud)

Barbara Jefford ... Dr. Ruth Faber
Rosemary Dexter ... Chiara (as Rosemarie Dexter)

Frank Finlay ... Igor Bounin

Burt Kwouk ... Peng

Arnoldo Foà ... Gelasio (as Arnoldo Foa')
Paul Rogers ... Augustinian
George Pravda ... Gorshenin (credit only)

Clive Revill ... Vucovich
Niall MacGinnis ... Capuchin Monk
Marne Maitland ... Cardinal Rahamani

Isa Miranda ... The Marchesa
Gerald Harper ... Brian
Leopoldo Trieste ... Dying Man's Friend

Peter Copley ... English Cardinal
Arthur Howard ... English Cardinal
Jean Rougeul ... Dominican
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Frederick ... American Cardinal (uncredited)
Åke Lindman ... Soldier Releasing Lakota (uncredited)
Dom Moor ... Polish Cardinal (uncredited)
Alfred Thomas ... African Cardinal (uncredited)

Directed by
Michael Anderson 
 
Writing credits
John Patrick (screenplay) and
James Kennaway (screenplay)

Morris L. West (novel)

Produced by
George Englund .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alex North 
 
Cinematography by
Erwin Hillier (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Ernest Walter 
 
Art Direction by
Edward C. Carfagno  (as Edward Carfagno)
George W. Davis 
 
Costume Design by
Orietta Nasalli-Rocca 
 
Makeup Department
Amato Garbini .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Stanley Goldsmith .... production manager
Frederick Muller .... unit production manager (as Fritz Mueller)
Danilo Sabatini .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Tony Brandt .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Tom Jung .... poster designer (uncredited)
Italo Tomassi .... scenic artist (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Kurt Doubrowsky .... sound mixer (as Kurt Doubravsky)
Franklin Milton .... recording supervisor
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ernest Day .... camera operator: second unit (as Ernie Day)
 
Editorial Department
Alessandro Lucidi .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Armbruster .... conductor (uncredited)
Robert Bain .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
Harry Bluestone .... musician: violin (uncredited)
Dennis Budimir .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
Larry Bunker .... musician: drums (uncredited)
Carl Fortina .... musician: accordion (uncredited)
Caesar Giovannini .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Artie Kane .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Louis Kaufman .... musician: violin (uncredited)
Carol Kaye .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
Milton Kestenbaum .... musician: bass (uncredited)
Michael Lang .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Virginia Majewski .... musician: viola (uncredited)
Samuel Matlovsky .... conductor (uncredited)
Alex North .... conductor (uncredited)
Jack Preisner .... musician: accordion (uncredited)
Uan Rasey .... musician: trumpet (uncredited)
David Tamkin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Raymond Turner .... musician: piano (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Margaret Roy Anderson .... dialogue coach
Antonio Petrucci .... technical advisor (as Dott. Antonio Petrucci)
Adone Terzariol .... technical advisor (as Monsignor Adone Terzariol)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
162 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:PG | Australia:G (original rating) | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:S | Netherlands:AL (orginal rating) | New Zealand:G | Sweden:Btl | USA:G

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The coronation tiara worn by the new pope in this movie, is actually a copy of the actual coronation tiara worn by Pope Paul VI.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): Kiril Lakota is often identified as a Russian, when in fact he is an Ukrainian, a different nationality.See more »
Quotes:
The Marchesa:I am an old-fashioned woman, Mr. Faber. I believe in life, love, and the pursuit of happiness. But you have to know the rules of the game.See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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26 out of 34 people found the following review useful.
An Ukrainian Catholic bishop is elected Pope and tries to prevent WWIII., 13 May 2005
Author: Deusvolt from United States

The election of a Pope from behind the former Iron Curtain has come to pass. The proposition that China would launch a military invasion of its neighbors to feed its starving masses was implausible even in 1968. All the major powers, including the former Soviet Union would not have stood for it. And today, with China being the most active powerhouse of the world economy whose interests are intertwined with the United States and the European Union, the proposition of a Chinese military adventure for economic gain seems preposterous.

What remains to be current in the film is the subplot regarding Fr. Telemond (Oskar Werner) who is based on the real-life Jesuit scholar, Fr. Teilhard de Chardin, a paleontologist who got in trouble with the Roman Curia because of his attempt to reconcile science and religion through a new theology based on the natural sciences. This aspect of the film came to mind as I followed developments on the controversy between proponents of the "intelligent design" approach in teaching science versus the secular evolution approach.

In the film, Fr. Telemond in expounding on his theological evolution before a papal commission of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith could not adequately explain his adherence to the idea that God created the world through evolution when it was pointed out to him that evolution proceeds through violence (cf. "survival of the fittest") which would mean that God is the "author of violence" as Cardinal Leone (portrayed by Leo Mckern) put it. In hindsight, the Catholic Church had long ago made peace with evolution when Pope Pius XII said that it doesn't matter how the creation of the world is explained as long as it does not preclude or deny the existence of The Creator.

The current brouhaha in Kansas is the product of a misunderstanding of evolution both by the religionists and the agnostic-atheists. The theory of evolution along the now classical Darwinian lines does not explain the origin of life but only the diversity of life. Much less does it attempt to explain the origin of the universe.

Unfortunately, the enemies of religion ever since the Enlightenment have tried to use science to disprove the existence of God and there are those among them, either misinformed or malicious, who teach that evolution and astrophysics have negated the idea of the existence of a Creator. Current understanding of quantum physics imply that the substance of matter in its smallest manifestations may not be "material" after all, in the sense that "matter" has been understood. Einstein, of course, has shown the equation between energy and matter. But more recent discoveries borne out of smashing atoms and subatomic particles indicate that the smallest quanta are capable of uniting with other particles not because of their materiality nor even of their energy content, but because of the information they contain. Thus, the perceived self-organization of "matter" seems to be guided by antecedent information it contains. So the intriguing question is begged: Who put that information there?

Clearly Kiril was sent to the Gulag because he is a Catholic Bishop in an atheistic Soviet empire. Worse, he is Ukrainian Catholic. Even under Czarist Russia, a confessional state under Greek Eastern Orthodoxy (in this case Russian because the Greek Orthodox Church is divided along national lines), Catholics were frowned upon. The Ukrainian Catholics though not Roman Rite Catholics, have their own rite and are united with the Holy See. And of course, the Ukrainians never thought of themselves as simply an ethnic group within Russia but as an actual nation, an attitude that did not sit well with the ruling powers at the Kremlin.

Trivia: In both the movie and the book, members of the Curia wondered whether Pope Kiril would use the traditional crucifix (a cross with the corpus depicting Christ) as his pectoral cross, the sign of his office as Bishop of Rome according to the Latin Rite or, whether he would use an icon. As historical perspective, the Iconoclastic Controversy (when some quarters interpreted images as idolatrous in the Old Testament sense) in the Byzantine Empire was resolved by allowing representations of God and His saints in flat or semi-flat media as in painting and mosaics but not in the round as in statues. Pope Kiril stuck with the icon. Typically that would have shown Christ on one side and the Virgin Mary as the Mother of Perpetual Help on the other.

You would note also that Kiril opted to use his own name with his title of Pope foregoing a tradition of taking the name of a saint or predecessor whose examples a pope wishes to emulate during his reign. This was well as it should have been because Kiril is obviously named after St. Cyril, who with his companion St. Methodius converted the Slavs to Christianity. They, of course, came from the Eastern Roman Empire (now referred to by historians as the Byzantine Empire) whose center of power was Constantinople where Greek had supplanted the Latin of the fallen Western Roman Empire.

The line I liked best in the movie was delivered by the Soviet Premier (played by Olivier) who, upon seeing Bishop Lakota (Quinn) after so many years in the Gulag, remarked (and here I freely quote from memory): "Before you acted as if you had the truth in your own private pocket and no one could dispute it with you. But now you don't seem so sure. I like you better now."

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Why was Pope Kiril called 'a Russian Pope?' laxchief
Can't make mistake? tgemberl
Latin phrases used in the film jimpoz
Conclave question MsKris
I'm Not Catholic, But........ slatbrad-1
Kiril's Solution is Temporary Fix charlesblank-2
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