A no-nonsense businessman, Mr. Wilkie, is interviewed for a position with a top-of-the-line hotel chain corporation. During the interview, Wilkie attempts to complete a shaggy-dog story. ... See full summary »

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Ray Smith ...
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Derek Godfrey ...
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Ann Bell ...
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Betty Bowden ...
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Jane Murdoch ...
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Storyline

A no-nonsense businessman, Mr. Wilkie, is interviewed for a position with a top-of-the-line hotel chain corporation. During the interview, Wilkie attempts to complete a shaggy-dog story. His frustrations lead to a total breakdown. He suddenly snaps and pulls a gun on the interviewers. Written by Bhob Stewart <bhob@genie.com>

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10 November 1968 (UK)  »

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Trivia

For a long time it was thought that the only copy of this play had been destroyed soon after transmission due to broadcasters' policies at that time of reusing videotape instead of archiving it. However vintage TV enthusiast group Kaleidoscope found the tape, which had been wrongly filed, in broadcaster LWT's London archive while researching a book on ITV dramas in 2005. See more »

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early Dennis Potter with a killer punchline
1 September 2008 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

'The Shaggy Dog' is an early Dennis Potter TV play which first aired as part of the series 'Company of Five' in 1968. Its main part, Mr Wilkie the job applicant, is played by stage actor John Neville (perhaps best known for playing Baron Munchausen for Terry Gilliam twenty years later). At first it looks as if we have a straightforward story of an HR man (Cyril Luckham), an applicant, and a management consultant (Derek Godfrey), but it quickly transpires that things are not as they appear.

The quality of this film is definitely on the low side but the performances and the script are still sharp, and the punchline, although heavily telegraphed in retrospect, was a bit of a surprise. Whether this play is simply a chiller, a black comedy, a drama, or a bit of all, Neville's weird and slightly pervy/unhinged Wilkie will keep your interest.


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