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Rosemary's Baby
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Rosemary's Baby More at IMDbPro »

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Rosemary's Baby

8/10
Author: Orcun Vurmaz from Turkey
20 May 2011

Rosemary's Baby is a true genre classic.Undoubtedly, this film is certainly one of the best horror/suspense films ever made. As a horror fan I thought I was missing out on a lot by not having seen this, and I was right.Expectations were high and this one lived up to them.This movie is an example of the horror genre done right; there are spine-chilling moments, satanic images and horror themes that will stay with you forever. The editing in these parts is very impressive as well, creating visual illusions without special effects. It also contains some of the damned finest performances a horror film has ever seen.Mia Farrow was nominated for a Golden Globe award for her performance, and quite rightly so.Farrow's portrayal of the helpless mother desperately seeking to protect her unborn child is powerfully emotional. Ruth Gordon also put in a splendid performance as the creepy character of Minnie.This is a masterpiece of horror. Everyday situations have an undercurrent of evil. These skillfully hid details haunt the viewer. An odd closet, a suicide, her neighbors' extreme interest… As the date of birth gets closer, the film grows increasingly claustrophobic. The development of the plot gets interrupted abruptly in the last scenes, when the intrigue is revealed.The story builds a nice conspiracy well and sustains a real creepy atmosphere all the way through to good effect.Farrow is suitable unbalanced and we feel her fear and suspicion growing during the film. Her performance is really good and the fact that she manages to balance her own doubt for most of the film is very effective.The music is also very memorable and creepy.Overall, this is a perfect adaptation of Ira Levin's book, Rosemary's Baby remains today one of the best horror movies, not for its use of gore, but for its use of tension and surprise.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Rosemary's Baby

8/10
Author: nagihan-tutar from Turkey
19 May 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I watched this movie at the listening and pronunciation lesson. When I watched the beginning of the film I disappointed because the first forty-five minutes or so seem fairly normal and conventional. There isn't any interesting things . The story follows a happily married couple, Rosemary and a struggling actor Guy, looking for a new apartment. They find a very nice and large apartment that fits them perfectly well but has a rather disturbing history (And how many times have we seen that in movies?). Very soon they meet their new elderly neighbors. Minnie and Roman that seem very friendly, may be a bit too friendly. Soon, Rosemary gets pregnant and the couple celebrates this happening with their dear neighbors that are eager to take very good care of Rosemary and help her out as much as they can. They even talk Rosemary into seeing a doctor of their choosing. She starts to have strange dreams and soon she becomes very suspicious of her neighbors and their "helping" with the baby. Rosemary and Guy moved a new apartment where some bad things had happened. They wanted to have a baby. Everything begins with rosemary's pregnancy. She becomes alone, helpless, and trapped in her fears .Until the end, we don't know if her suspicions are valid. The main event seems to be the ending. She learns her baby is from Satan. Her husband and neighbors cheated her. In my opinion, this film is different. It isn't quite like any film I have ever seen. It is on the top horror films list but it wasn't scary for me.I think it is a drama instead of a horror.I was affected by Rosemary's physical appearance and also her psychology. At some point you feel pity about her. Even though it finished up with sadness. If one ask me about this movie, I strongly advise it.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

it is good movie for watching..

10/10
Author: duru92 from Turkey
14 May 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Rosemary's Baby I watched this movie one month at the listening and pronunciation lesson with my friends in school. While I was watching this movie, at the first I found it very boring. It was boring because in the film ordinary things were happening. For example; Rosemary and her husband were searching home, and when they found home, they moved there. When they moved there, Rosemary met with one woman, who killed herself by jumping from the window, in laundry. After that, Rosemary met with her new old neighbors. These old neighbors were the people, living with woman who committed suicide. Like every couples, Rosemary and her husband wanted to have a baby. And finally Rosemary became a pregnant. These things were ordinary according to me. However, later film began to become interesting. It was interesting especially while Rosemary began to realize some facts about her husband, her neighbors and her doctor. The facts were that her husband, neighbors, and doctor were Satan or witches. She realized that facts with the help of Hutch. Hutch was Rosemary's and her husband's friend. In order to help Rosemary about this issue, Dutch gave a book to Rosemary about witches. However, this book did not given directly by Hutch, it was given by Hutch's friend because Hutch was died. And Rosemary read this book. While reading this book which was about the witches, she found some information about her neighbors. She said these information to her husband but her husband acted as if he had not believed her and without saying anything to Rosemary, he threw away this book. Because if Rosemary had attended to read this book, she would have understand the facts about them. However, later Rosemary bought another book which was like thrown book. And she read this book. And she understood that her husband, neighbors, and her old doctor who was advised by her neighbor were witches. I think this understanding process was interesting and very excited. And after all these things, Rosemary had a baby. However, they said to Rosemary that her baby was died. Firstly Rosemary believed that but later she did not believe. And she went one room which was full of Satan. And after she had gone to there, she both became sure about her husband, neighbors, doctor were Satan and learned that her baby did not die. This part is frustrating. Later she looked at her baby and she saw that her baby's eyes disgusting! I think that this was upsetting especially for the mother. And I think the film ended up in sadness. Finally, I think about the movie, at the beginning it was boring but later it became interesting, enjoyable, exciting. And later it became frustrating. And and and it finished up with sadness. And if one ask me about this movie, I strongly advise it.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Well-acted, amazingly directed, and with an atmosphere all of it's own.

Author: ASpiralingRedDream from United States
24 April 2011

Rosemary's Baby is perhaps the least violent 'horror' film I have ever seen.

This is my first Roman Polanski film, and he does an amazing job. His screenplay is smart in really absorbing us into these characters' lives. The first half of the film can be seen as just a regular domestic drama in a way. He creatively directs the film so that by the time the climax comes it's just utterly fantastic. I won't say that the film was unpredictable though, partly in turns because whenever one sees a 'satan' film we hear about Rosemary's Baby. It's sort of like Psycho's big twist. It has had such a large legacy that it's shocking if you don't know what the film is really about.

Saying that however, this is a meticulously detailed drama-turned mystery- turned thriller- turned horror film. It's also quite fascinating how little I got based on actual physical horror. I thought Mia Farrow was fantastic in this.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

rosemary's baby

8/10
Author: ebekizi from Turkey
23 April 2011

Rosemary's Baby is one of the greatest horror film of that times. It was made 43 years ago, however it is rather fantastic. Rosemary and her husband Guy Woodhouse move to an apartment. They meet their elderly neighbors named Roman and Minnie Castevet who are very friendly to them. Although their friendly behaviors, Rosemary feels something strange about them. On the contrary, her husband begins to be very close to them. Rosemary and her husband wants to have a baby, and the night that they decided to have a baby, Minnie comes and brings them a desert to eat. At first Rosemary hesitates to eat it but her husband insists on her to eat. After eating that, she feels dizzy and she thinks that she sees a nightmare but she really lives it. That part of the film is really thrilling, complex and disturbing to me. While watching the scene, i felt so nervous and disgusted. Rosemary becomes pregnant but something starts going wrong. She begins to lose weight and suffer from terrible pains. She begins to complain about her pains but her husband and neighbors don't care about her discomfort. Nobody attempts to help her, even her friends, and her doctor... When she understands that all of them are witches, she wants to run away but because of her baby, firstly she has to go to her doctor and she tells the doctor that her husband and neighbors are witches and they want to harm her baby. But the doctor give her to them. They take her to home, she try to escape again but she can't escape and gives a birth. At the and of the film, we understand that she gives birth to a satanist baby. And she can do nothing in the face of such a situation. I think this is a disappointing ending. But this is not important because the film is absolutely gripping.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Polanski's genius

8/10
Author: moviesleuth2
17 February 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

His criminal record aside, it is obvious that Roman Polanski is a genius director. His ability to set up shots with a specific tone that grows evenly as the film proceeds is extraordinary. That is what makes this film work.

"Rosemary's Baby" is a slow burn thriller, one that starts innocently enough, but not exaggerated to the point where it's obvious that the character's lives are about to take a turn for the worse, but ever so gradually the gears start turning and the unsettling feeling starts to build. Polanski is no fool; he doesn't try to create two hours of terror (much like Hollywood does, but can't seem to understand that it has no idea what it's doing), he knows that Levin's story isn't like that. This decision saves the film from obvious doom. Actually, he constructs this film so well, that for a good portion of the film it's hard to believe that this is going to develop into a horror film.

Rosemary (Mia Farrow) and Guy (John Cassevetes) Woodhouse are a young married couple who are going to move into a new apartment. The one they pick is located next to the Castevets, a seemingly pleasant elderly couple. Guy takes an instant liking to the Castavets, but Rosemary finds them to be rather nosy, Minnie (Ruth Gordon) in particular. However, shortly after Rosemary gets pregnant, strange things start to happen.

The key to the success of any movie is its credibility (I use the word "credible" with the knowledge that some movies, such as Lord of the Rings, have no use for believability. The audience only has to buy them within its own context). Polanski understands this, and the way he chooses to develop this is not only effective, but completely original. Bad things start to happen when Rosemary takes the advice of the Castevets, if only out of politeness. For example, when Minnie asks her what doctor she is seeing, Minnie insists that she see a different one, one that she trusts. Rosemary is already comfortable with her own doctor, but being polite she takes Minnie's advice (I suppose it helps that the doctor Minnie suggests has a good reputation too, which, in the hands of Polanski and his excellent actors, enhances the credibility instead of making it overkill).

The performances are excellent. Mia Farrow and John Cassevetes make a great couple with tremendous chemistry. It's easy to believe that they are a loving husband and wife. The other two principal characters, Minnie and Roman (Sidney Blackmer) are perfect equals to the Woodhouses. They don't develop the Castavets as characters, instead they act like a real elderly retired couple. Ruth Gordon is especially good at this, but perhaps that's because she has a good deal more screen time than her on screen husband. Everyone can see a lot of an elderly retired woman with a lot of time on her hands. Someone who loves to socialize, and is helpful to the point where it is a turnoff to others (though she doesn't realize it). This level of credibility can only come from a talented director and a terrific cast of actors who really care about the project they are working on.

I guess for some people, adding the element of "is she crazy or is this for real" gives a film another level of complexity, and heightens the level of fear. Maybe its because I've seen a number of films like this recently (the beginning of "The Descent" being one of them), or maybe it's just a personal preference, but I find that being able to put a face on my fear more refreshing (provided it's done well). Nevertheless, this uncertainty is conveyed perfectly, as I can say with absolute truthfulness that until the time that Polanski intended for the truth to come out, I had no idea if Rosemary was crazy or not.

Kudos to Polanski for being able to hold everything together for the whole film, at least until the final shot (warning: MAJOR SPOILER ahead). When Rosemary was pressured by Roman Castavet to be a mother to her child (being the newly spawn of Satan), I didn't buy her giving in. Her erratic fear that made up the majority of the film was too potent for that kind of an about face.

Still, this is a good little chiller. Not too frightening or disturbing, and except for the aftermath of a "suicide", there's no real violence or gore to speak of. It's the mark of a superb chiller, one that doesn't use violence and gore to make up for it's lack of ideas and skill.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Mia Farrow is magnificent in unsettling film that mixes comedy and horror

9/10
Author: mlraymond from Durham NC
13 February 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I was too young to see this movie when it was first shown, and I was not impressed when I finally saw it after a few years had gone by. But having seen it four or five times now, I actually believe it improves with age. It is subtle and low key, and quite slow paced by today's standards. There is far more genuinely horrifying action in Polanski's other Sixties classic Repulsion, which leads me to believe that Rosemary's Baby may actually be viewed better as a black comedy than a true horror film. Many viewers have commented on the light hearted opening, that seems almost like a typical Sixties romantic comedy. The gradual darkening of the story is so subtly done that it's almost imperceptible. A vague feeling of unease, with little in the way of overt violence or horror, starts to permeate the film. There is enough ambiguity in the way events unfold that it's possible to see Rosemary as becoming disconnected from reality and imagining a plot against her. The eccentric neighbors may be no more than a nosy but well meaning old couple, her husband's unexpected success due to the accidental misfortune of a competitor for an important part, the tragic death of a young woman a genuine suicide. Is there any actual proof that these things are more than mere coincidences? Mia Farrow's brilliant performance makes us experience these doubts and fears along with her.

The film is very much a product of its time, the late Sixties. It touched on many ideas and events of a world increasingly chaotic and tumultuous, in ways that audiences born since that era could not relate to without direct experience. It was made at a time in which the Vietnam war was starting to become more controversial, the sexual revolution had begun, but the women's movement and legalized abortion were still in the future, along with anti-war riots and the assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King. It occupies a place in history as a sort of time capsule of the era, just as momentous and overwhelming changes were in the offing. The " God is dead" controversy that forms much of the background of the story must seem almost quaint to viewers today, but was a major aspect of the film's controversy.

Viewers expecting a shocking and horrific experience will probably be disappointed, but those who can appreciate a slow building, quietly unnerving film will find much to enjoy here. Much is left to the imagination, and it requires active involvement on the viewer's part. It may require patience for those accustomed to more visceral and fast paced movies, but it is well worth taking the time to appreciate.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Tannis Anyone?

9/10
Author: jcnsoflorida from South Florida
20 March 2007

Movies were constantly raising the bar for shocking in the late Sixties but few succeeded like this one. It was one of the last films officially 'Condemned' by the Catholic Legion of Decency. The dream sequences were easily the best of their time and continue to hold up well. Polanski's delight in the medium is palpable throughout but it never distracts from the narrative. The movie's texture --sophisticated Manhattan, but attainable-- resonates beautifully in the Christmas season scenes and later, when the temperature rises and Rosemary fumbles in a public phone booth. Note the gay friends at Ro and Guy's party. All the actors are in top form. Mia Farrow, lovely and vulnerable but crucially believable. Cassavettes as an ambitious actor, young but his biological clock is ticking. Did the Catholic Church get it right? This exemplifies the subversive power of cinema.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Brilliantly done

Author: hybridsun from United States
25 June 2006

A great film that personifies the totally and wild experimentation of the late 60's via Roman Polanksi-(that would be tame today nearly 40 years later) Which is nonetheless timeless, with great performances by all -Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon and Sydney Blackmer.

It rates with other tripped out films of the late 60's- rating with such as 2001: A Space Oydessy.

Done very well filmed at the Dakota apartments in NYC and with a great late 1960's attitude, that today nearly 40 years later remains a classic Gothic horror story. One on the greatest horror films ever done, that us done with a great amount of aplomb.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

What a creepy movie!

8/10
Author: jerrythecow from United States
17 June 2006

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I don't care how "scary" and "exiting" and "heart-pounding" movies are today: This is by far the scariest! Rosemary's baby is about a couple that buys a house with a mysterious past. After becoming pregnant, Rosemary (Mia Farrow) begins to suspect that everybody in the building, including her husband (John Cassavetes), is a Satan-worshiping, anti-Christian witch. Is she imagining it, or is it real? And if it is, will she be able to save her baby? The movie does start out slow, and doesn't really pick up until she becomes pregnant. Also, some of it is boring, and not all is very scary. But the parts that are: *shiver*! Roman Polanski is a good director of horror. I did not think much of the ending was good, but my favorite line is when Minnie Castavet(Ruth Gordon) remarks: "He chose you, honey! From all the women in the world to be the mother of his only living son!" Obviously playing on the Jesus story, Minnie says this in her strong, New York accent, making the situation almost comical.

All in all, a very creepy movie!

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