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Romeo and Juliet (1968)

PG | | Drama, Romance | 8 October 1968 (USA)
When two young members of feuding families meet, forbidden love ensues.

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Writers:

(play), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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2,562 ( 111)

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ON DISC
Won 2 Oscars. Another 14 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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The Nurse
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Paul Hardwick ...
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Antonio Pierfederici ...
Esmeralda Ruspoli ...
Lady Montague
Roberto Bisacco ...
Lord Paris
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Peter
Keith Skinner ...
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Storyline

Shakespeare's classic tale of romance and tragedy. Two families of Verona, the Montagues and the Capulets, have been feuding with each other for years. Young Romeo Montague goes out with his friends to make trouble at a party the Capulets are hosting, but while there he spies the Capulet's daughter Juliet, and falls hopelessly in love with her. She returns his affections, but they both know that their families will never allow them to follow their hearts. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The 1968 Royal Film Performance [UK Theatrical] See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

8 October 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Gross:

$38,901,218 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (initial release)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Along with the fight between Romeo and Paris, the scene where Romeo reads the party's guest list, discovering that Rosaline would be in attendance, was also cut from the final version. See more »

Goofs

In the opening fight between the Capulets and the Montagues, Tybalt gives Benvolio a very nasty stab to the eye (area) with his sword. Then, in the next scene, when Benvolio meets Romeo, he shows absolutely no sign of any injury or distress. See more »

Quotes

Abraham: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?
Sampson: I do bite my thumb, sir.
Abraham: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?
Sampson: Is the law of our side if I say ay?
Gregory: No.
Sampson: No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you sir; but I bite my thumb, sir.
Gregory: Do you quarrel, sir?
Abraham: Quarrel, sir? No, sir.
Sampson: If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.
Abraham: No better.
[...]
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Connections

Version of Estudio 1: Romeo y Julieta (1972) See more »

Soundtracks

What Is Youth?
Music by Nino Rota
Lyric by Eugene Walter
Vocal by Glen Weston
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User Reviews

 
The greatest film I've ever seen.
10 April 1999 | by (Marietta, GA, USA) – See all my reviews

To my way of thinking, this film should be considered when people discuss the greatest movies of all time. Every scene, practically every frame of this movie is brilliant. Director Zeffirelli went against the ancient practice of using older actors in the title roles, and the performances he elicits from teenagers Whiting and Hussey is amazing. Although he trims the dialog heavily in places (Romeo says, "But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?"- and leaves it at that) his version captures all the passion of Shakespeare's play magnificently.

The scenes at the Capulet's ball at which the two young lovers meet are about the greatest I've ever seen on screen. The famous balcony scene avoids cliches altogether and makes others pale by comparison. The Queen Mab speech, the fight, and the scene in the tomb are all exquisite highlights of this film. Even the dubbing for the Italian actor's voices and of the crowd noise is superior. It is amazing to me that an Italian could be so sensitively in tune with one of the English language's most sublime works.

Zeffirelli wanted to make a movie that spoke to youth and he succeeded, to put it very mildly. If school systems were smart, they'd pack up their freshmen and sophomores on buses every year, drive them to a local theatre and show them this movie. I can't think of a better investment in young people's education that could be made. It worked for me.


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