IMDb > The Odd Couple (1968)
The Odd Couple
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The Odd Couple (1968) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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7.7/10   20,675 votes »
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MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 9% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Neil Simon (from the play by)
Neil Simon (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Odd Couple on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 May 1968 (Brazil) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau are The Odd Couple See more »
Plot:
Two friends try sharing an apartment, but their ideas of housekeeping and lifestyles are as different as night and day. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 6 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(305 articles)
User Reviews:
"I'm a neurotic nut, but you're crazy" See more (98 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Jack Lemmon ... Felix Ungar

Walter Matthau ... Oscar Madison

John Fiedler ... Vinnie

Herb Edelman ... Murray (as Herbert Edelman)

David Sheiner ... Roy
Larry Haines ... Speed
Monica Evans ... Cecily Pigeon

Carole Shelley ... Gwendolyn Pigeon
Iris Adrian ... Waitress
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Matty Alou ... Himself (uncredited)
Bill Baldwin ... Sports Announcer (uncredited)
Al Barlick ... Home Plate Umpire (uncredited)
John C. Becher ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Ted Beniades ... Bartender (uncredited)

Billie Bird ... Chambermaid (uncredited)
Patricia D. Bohannon ... Bowler (uncredited)
Ken Boyer ... Himself (uncredited)

Heywood Hale Broun ... Himself - Sports Writer (uncredited)
Jerry Buchek ... Himself (uncredited)
Roberto Clemente ... Himself (uncredited)
Tommy Davis ... Himself (uncredited)
Augie Donatelli ... First Base Umpire (uncredited)
Jack Fisher ... Himself (uncredited)
Ann Graeff ... Scrubwoman (uncredited)
Bud Harrelson ... Himself (uncredited)
Cleon Jones ... Himself (uncredited)
Ed Kranepool ... Himself (uncredited)
Vernon Law ... Himself (uncredited)
Jack Lightcap ... Public Address Announcer (uncredited)
Bill Mazeroski ... Himself (uncredited)
Joe Palma ... Butcher (uncredited)

Angelique Pettyjohn ... Go-Go Dancer (uncredited)
Harry Spear ... Janitor (uncredited)
Ralph Stantley ... Cop (uncredited)

Maury Wills ... Himself (uncredited)
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Directed by
Gene Saks 
 
Writing credits
Neil Simon (from the play by)

Neil Simon (screenplay)

Produced by
Howard W. Koch .... producer
 
Original Music by
Neal Hefti 
 
Cinematography by
Robert B. Hauser (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Frank Bracht (edited by)
 
Art Direction by
Hal Pereira 
Walter H. Tyler  (as Walter Tyler)
 
Set Decoration by
Robert R. Benton  (as Robert Benton)
Ray Moyer 
 
Costume Design by
Jack Bear (costumes designed by)
 
Makeup Department
Nellie Manley .... hair style supervisor
Jack Petty .... makeup artist
Harry Ray .... makeup artist
Wally Westmore .... hair style supervisor
 
Production Management
William Davidson .... unit production manager (as William C. Davidson)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Hank Moonjean .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
John R. Carter .... sound recordist (as John Carter)
Charles Grenzbach .... sound recordist
 
Visual Effects by
Paul K. Lerpae .... special photographic effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Frank J. Calabria .... additional photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
John A. Anderson .... wardrobe: men (as John Anderson)
 
Music Department
Lowell Marttin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Hal Mooney .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Luanna S. Poole .... script continuity
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
105 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
One of five Neil Simon written films produced by producer Howard W. Koch and all for the Paramount Pictures studio. The movies include Plaza Suite (1971), Star Spangled Girl (1971), The Odd Couple (1968), Come Blow Your Horn (1963) and Last of the Red Hot Lovers (1972).See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: After Oscar throws Felix out of the apartment, the guys are out searching for Felix in Murray's police car. When Vinnie comes out of Felix's old apartment, they are seen driving in police car #578. In the next scene, they are parked and two other officers pull up in car #578, and the guys pull off in car #527. In the next scene, they are back in #578 again.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Felix Ungar:A room, please.
Hotel clerk:You alone?
[Felix nods]
Hotel clerk:Luggage?
[Felix shakes his head]
Hotel clerk:How long do you want it for?
Felix Ungar:Oh, not very long.
Hotel clerk:Five dollars.
[Felix isn't paying attention]
[...]
See more »
Soundtrack:
Rule BritanniaSee more »

FAQ

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3 out of 3 people found the following review useful.
"I'm a neurotic nut, but you're crazy", 26 September 2008
Author: ackstasis from Australia

I don't think I've really ever given Walter Matthau his due as a comedic performer. He's certainly been wonderful in plenty of lighthearted roles, but I guess I always put his success down to his characters' grumpiness and ruthlessness, a gruff contrast to the flamboyant personality of his frequent co-star Jack Lemmon, and, I suppose, a natural extension of his earlier work in dramatic pictures. Watching Gene Saks' 'The Odd Couple (1968),' adapted from a popular Neil Simon play, the realisation suddenly clicked: Matthau is, in his own right, absolutely hilarious! Initially striking the audience as filthy, crude and generally unappealing, his Oscar Madison eventually manages to worm his way into our hearts, culminating in a hilariously overplayed confession of emotions that Matthau rasps out in a voice not entirely his own. At the same time, while holding his own as a comedian, his interplay with Lemmon is, of course, pitch-perfect; indeed, the film rightly belongs to both actors, who have never failed to light up the cinema screen by themselves, let alone together.

Calling to mind Billy Wilder's screenplay for 'The Apartment (1960),' this Neil Simon comedy builds itself around around a rather morbid premise. Compulsive house-cleaner Felix Unger (Lemmon), having just been evicted by his wife of twelve years, attempts to commit suicide, but fruitlessly abandons the idea after he wrecks his back trying to open the hotel window. Dejected, he arrives at the house of good friend Oscar (Matthau), a divorced slob who lives alone on a diet of potato crisps and green sandwiches (that might contain either very new cheese or very old meat!). Oscar kindly offers Felix a place to stay, but is soon overwhelmed by his friend's finicky personality and constant insistence on absolute cleanliness. The pair form an unusual sort of marital arrangement, with Felix assuming the role of the effeminate and constantly-nagging wife, and Oscar as the sloppy, unappreciative husband who always comes home later than he's supposed to. This is a marriage that barely lasts three weeks, and, by the end of it, we can completely sympathise with Felix's ex-wife, who remains unseen.

'The Odd Couple' is a terrific comedy, most of all because it has a lot of heart. For all their arguing, it's obvious that the two roommates have plenty of affection for each other, most movingly seen when Felix tries to launch into a furious tirade, instead – perhaps inadvertently – ending up informing Oscar how "tops" he his. The pair's four poker buddies (John Fiedler, Herb Edelman, David Sheiner and Larry Haines) are also constantly badgering each other about some obscure annoyance, but you can't deny that they've got the best of intentions. Their decision to treat Felix as though nothing has happened to him may have sounded fine in theory, but maybe being ignored wasn't quite the correct solution to Felix's gloomy feelings of inadequacy and inconsequentiality. Unlike some comedies based on popular stage plays {I was recently disappointed by Wilder's 'The Seven Year Itch (1955)}, this film doesn't simply strike at the same chord throughout, and the relationship between the two leads is progressively developed, through tears, laughter and much disagreement.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Odd Couple (1968)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
One of the Doors in the Apartment. (I think leading to Oscar's room) jbartelone
My perception... jofus224
what 2 actors would be good for a remake? JBarethecutest
Favorite lines/scenes from the film? nightcrawler71
What if Billy Wilder had directed this? nelson95
Is it time enough to remake this film??? AllieF0X
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