The Lion in Winter
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

1-20 of 61 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Five Movies That Don't Seem Like Christmas Movies

22 December 2011 4:21 PM, PST | Huffington Post | See recent Huffington Post news »

Los Angeles -- Alonso Duralde literally wrote the book on Christmas movies: It's called "Have Yourself a Movie Little Christmas." So who better to guest-program the Five Most space this week?

Only Duralde – a film critic for The Wrap and (full disclosure) my co-host on the YouTube review show "What the Flick?!" – did it with a twist. He chose five movies that may not initially seem like Christmas movies yet have that Christmasy vibe. After all, anyone can pop "It's a Wonderful Life" or "Elf" into the DVD player on Dec. 25, but we've got the expert, in his own words:

_ "Eyes Wide Shut" (1999): You may remember the notorious orgy sequence – or the scenes of then-married couple Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman speaking frankly about their sexual fantasies – but Stanley Kubrick's final film is set squarely in the Christmas season, with almost every scene involving twinkle lights or wrapping paper or a decorated tree. »

- AP

Permalink | Report a problem


Joanna Lumley: 'Patsy is a strong woman. She has to be. She hasn't eaten since 1973'

11 December 2011 11:59 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Bond girl, fashion icon, renowned stage actor, Gurkha champion: Joanna Lumley has had a wonderful career. But it is her portrayal of Patsy in Absolutely Fabulous that is stamped on the nation's consciousness. She talks about the new episodes of the show

Perhaps, in retrospect, it was a mistake to mention Eleanor of Aquitaine's nipples to Joanna Lumley. And yet it seemed irresistible. After all, in the 1968 film version of James Goldman's Broadway play The Lion in Winter, Katharine Hepburn makes great play of them during Eleanor's so-called desolation monologue.

Picture the scene: it's Christmas, 1183, at the Château de Chinon. Eleanor, who has been imprisoned by her husband King Henry II of England (Peter O'Toole) since 1173, to be let out only for the holidays, has spent most of the action sparring with him and his hotsy-totsy mistress, or taunting her sons, compost-smelling John, historically neglible Geoffrey and future Lionheart, »

- Stuart Jeffries

Permalink | Report a problem


Patty Jenkins Will Not Direct Thor 2

6 December 2011 4:20 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Surprising news from Deadline tonight as it appears that Patty Jenkins has quit as director of Thor 2.

The Marvel Studios sequel is set to roll into cinemas in July of 2013 and is already in pre-production while the studio wait (as do we all) for the highly anticipated Avengers movie to bust blocks next Summer. Kenneth Branagh did a fine job with the first Thor movie, starring Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman, which had a wit not often seen in the Marvel and DC movie adaptations. Branagh was very complementary about the appointment of his successor who is best known for directing Monster as well as episodes of The Killing and Arrested Development, but reaffirmed his decision not to direct the sequel.

Tom Hiddleston, who plays Loki and will be returning along with Hemsworth and Portman in the second film, recently spoke to MTV about Jenkins,

[Jenkins is] amazing…I actually had »

- Jon Lyus

Permalink | Report a problem


Hollywood's Long History of Straightwashing Bio Pics

7 November 2011 6:56 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Almost as soon as it was announced that J. Edgar Hoover would be getting a new biopic, speculation has been rife over how his relationship with Clyde Tolson would be portrayed.

Although there's no definitive proof either way, it's widely assumed that Hoover, long-term director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Tolson, his assistant director, were lovers. Director Clint Eastwood sparked concern that Hoover's story would be “straightwashed” when he told The Wall Street Journal that the script “didn't quite go down [the] road” of addressing rumors of Hoover's being closeted and a cross-dresser. (Eastwood later confirmed with The Hollywood Reporter that he included a scene showing Hoover wearing his mother's dress.)

Meanwhile, out J. Edgar screenwriter Dustin Lance Black assured AfterElton that Hoover and Tolson would not be “de-gayed,” saying “To think that somehow you’re going to make a movie about somebody like J. Edgar and »

- John

Permalink | Report a problem


Joanna Lumley opens up

5 November 2011 5:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Joanna Lumley has gone from top model in the 60s to TV stardom across four decades. Her regal charm has her cast now as a real queen. But beneath her poised surface there's a fierce personality ready to snap against injustice

Everything with Joanna Lumley is legendary. Or phenomenal. Or extraooordinary. Unless it's awful. Or ghastly. Or appaaaaalling. Nobody enunciates with the kind of clarity and emphasis that Lumley uses. Especially when she employs added urgency. At times, it's a bit like trying to have a conversation with the entire cast of the RSC. Or Henry V, on the eve of battle. But then, there are moments when Joanna Lumley, the heroine of the Gurkhas, and scourge of immigration ministers, is a bit like Henry V, on the eve of battle. Any minute now, I think she might suggest we may step once more unto the breach.

But then, there »

- Carole Cadwalladr

Permalink | Report a problem


Vanessa Redgrave Academy Salute Pt.2: Paddy Chayefsky Denounces Political Oscar Speeches

4 November 2011 9:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Vanessa Redgrave Academy Salute: From Pariah to Honoree [Photo: Vanessa Redgrave, bearing an uncanny resemblance to Natasha Richardson, as ballerina Isadora Duncan in Isadora.] Later on, at the behest of producer Daniel Melnick (Straw Dogs, Making Love) screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky (The Goddess, Network) prefaced his announcement of the Best Screenwriting Oscar with the following (also via Inside Oscar): Before I get on to the writing awards, there's a little matter I'd like to tidy up … at least if I expect to live with myself tomorrow morning. I would like to say, personal opinion, of course, that I'm sick and tired of people exploiting the Academy Awards for the propagation of their own personal propaganda. I would like to suggest to Miss Redgrave that her winning an Academy Award is not a pivotal moment in history, does not require a proclamation and a simple "Thank you" would have sufficed. Chayefsky's use of the Academy Awards to make that particular political statement — that no political statements should »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar Horrors: Roman Polanski's Chalky Undertaste

26 October 2011 8:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

In the Oscar Horrors series we're celebrating Oscar nominated or Oscar winning achievements of or related to the Horror genre. Daily through Halloween!

Here Lies… Roman Polanski’s screenplay for Rosemary’s Baby, which he adapted from Ira Levin’s bestseller. It lost the statue for Best Adapted Screenplay to a tale of a very different plot – “There are plots against people, aren’t there?” in The Lion in Winter.

Ja from Mnpp here. When people ask me what my favorite movie is I tell them it’s a tie between Rosemary’s Baby and Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window. (I’ve always wished I could fall madly in love with another movie that starts with “R” just so I could make some lame comment about how I bide by “The 3 R’s” but it hasn’t happened yet. Yes I am a nerd.) Point being, since seeing Rosemary for »

- JA

Permalink | Report a problem


Comic Book Bites: Sin City 2, Thor 2 and War Heroes

26 October 2011 1:00 PM, PDT | The Geek Files | See recent The Geek Files news »

We know a sequel to the dark and violent hit Sin City is in the works, and that Robert Rodriguez will be back behind the camera. And we also know comic book legend Frank Miller returns as the co-scribe alongside Rodriguez.

Now add to that list the return of fan favorite characters Marv and Nancy Callahan; the roles filled by Jessica Alba (right) and Mickey Rourke. Miller, writer and artist of the cult comic series, talked to MTV about the upcoming adaptation.

"Sin City 2 is primarily an adaptation of the book A Dame to Kill For," says the writer. "It also features the short story Just Another Saturday Night and two new stories."

He also alluded to his connection to the film's director, Robert Rodriguez, explaining that they share more than just a love of hats. "Robert and I have kind of a magical chemistry that I was really quick to discover, »

- Michael Pellegrini

Permalink | Report a problem


Tom Hiddleston On Thor 2 Director Patty Jenkins

20 October 2011 8:50 AM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

Speaking with MTV Splashpage, Tom Hiddleston who played Loki in Thor and will play him again in next years The Avengers has weighed in to share his thoughts on Thor 2 director Patty Jenkins. Get More: Movie Trailers, Movies Blog "She's amazing," Hiddleston told MTV News recently. "I actually had dinner with her earlier this week and she's sensational, a really amazing woman and quite clearly an amazing director." "'Monster' is one of my favorite films. Weirdly enough, you won't believe me, but this is God's honest truth, before I started shooting 'Thor,' Ken Branagh gave me two films to watch. He said, 'Listen, this is sort of not related, but I want a quality of vulnerability from your performance, which is similar to these two things.' One of them was Peter O'Toole's performance in 'The Lion In Winter' and the second »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Thor 2' Director Patty Jenkins Is 'Sensational,' Says Tom Hiddleston

20 October 2011 8:34 AM, PDT | MTV Splash Page | See recent MTV Splash Page news »

Now that "Thor 2" has found its director in "Monster" helmer Patty Jenkins, it's time to find out what her plans are for the film! In a perfect world, we'd call up Jenkins and have a nice lengthy chat about her take on the second installment, how big a role Jane will have in the story, whether Loki will be the one and only baddie, etc. We don't have that quite yet, but the second best option is a sit-down with Tom Hiddleston wherein he reveals what his first meeting with Jenkins was like and what her vision is for "Thor 2."

"She's amazing," Hiddleston told MTV News recently. "I actually had dinner with her earlier this week and she's sensational, a really amazing woman and quite clearly an amazing director."

"'Monster' is one of my favorite films. Weirdly enough, you won't believe me, but this is God's honest truth, »

- Kara Warner

Permalink | Report a problem


Movies Edgar Wright has Never Seen - Help him decide what to watch on the big screen

18 October 2011 2:06 PM, PDT | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

Below you will find a list of movie that Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz director Edgar Wright has never seen. Not long ago Wright went out and asked his friends and fans to recommend some movies they thought he may have missed over the last thirty years of his life. He got recommendations from Quentin TarantinoDaniel WatersBill HaderJohn Landis, Guillermo Del Toro, Joe Dante, Judd Apatow, Joss Whedon, Greg Mottola, Schwartzman, Doug Benson, Rian Johnson, Larry Karaszeski, Josh Olson, Harry Knowles and hundreds of fans on this blog.

From these recommendations, Wright created a master list of recommended films that were frequently mentioned. The director now wants the fans to choose which of the films on the list he should watch on the big screen.

Wright is holding a film event at the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles called Films Edgar Has Never Seen. »

- Venkman

Permalink | Report a problem


Edgar Wright Has Never Seen These Movies, Pair Them Up For Four Nights In Los Angeles

18 October 2011 10:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Edgar Wright's latest epic project [1] has him partnering with Quentin Tarantino, Judd Apatow, Joss Whedon, Bill Hader, Guillermo Del Toro, Joe Dante, Greg Mottola, Harry Knowles, Rian Johnson and, probably, several of you. Like all of us, Wright has a bunch of classic and cult films he's never seen. Unlike all of us, he has the means to see them for the first time on the big screen and will do just that in December [2] at the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles during Films Edgar Has Never Seen. The director of Shaun of the Dead and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World asked both his famous friends (some of which are listed above) and fans to send in their personal must see lists and, from those titles, Wright came up with one mega list from which he'll pick a few movies to watch December 9-16. After the jump check »

- Germain Lussier

Permalink | Report a problem


So Long Mr. Cliff Robertson!

12 September 2011 9:41 AM, PDT | Manny the Movie Guy | See recent Manny the Movie Guy news »

Cliff Robertson passed away Saturday in Stony Brook, NY. The Oscar winner was 88. In 1969, Robertson took home the gold beating out Alan Arkin ("The Heart is a Lonely Hunter"), Peter O'Toole ("The Lion in Winter"), Alan Bates ("The Fixer), and Ron Moody ("Oliver!"). But Robertson's performance in "Charly" was deemed the best of the year (see clip below).

In 2002's "Spider-Man," Robertson, playing Uncle Ben, uttered the famous line that became the crux of the franchise -- "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility."

Here's more on the brilliant life of Cliff Robertson from the NY Daily News:

Robertson, a native of La Jolla, California, had already won an Emmy when he had his moment of big-screen recognition in 1968 -- 13 years after his feature debut in "Picnic." Though he played JFK as a young naval officer in "Pt 109 " - released five months before Dealey Plaza -- and gave an icy »

- Manny

Permalink | Report a problem


Anne Francis on TCM: Forbidden Planet, Brainstorm, A Lion Is In The Streets

29 August 2011 3:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

As part of its "Summer Under the Stars" film series, Turner Classic Movies is showing 12 Anne Francis movies today, including three TCM premieres. Those are actor-director William Conrad's Brainstorm (1965), veteran Raoul Walsh's A Lion Is in the Streets (1953), and actor-director Richard Benedict's Impasse (1969). [Anne Francis Movie Schedule.] Brainstorm is about a scientist intent on killing the husband of the woman he loves. The B thriller stars performers who had seen better big-screen days in the '40s and/or '50s: Jeffrey Hunter, Dana Andrews, Viveca Lindfors, and Francis. At the time, however, Francis was doing well for herself on television in the series Honey West, in which she played a sexy gumshoe whose partner was an ocelot. Based on a novel by Adria Locke Langley, A Lion Is in the Streets (1953) is a political drama that got made probably thanks to Robert Rossen's 1949 Oscar winner All the King's Men. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Your Fav' Sixties & Seventies Ladies

25 August 2011 10:15 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

During Summer 2011  -- winding down at last! -- we've been asking Tfe readers to choose the most memorable Best Actress nominated film characters. Which film characters have you taken into your hearts and headspace most fully? Who is always popping into mind unbidden? Below are the latest voting results for August's polls covering the 1960s & 1970s (previous results: 1980s and 1991-2010). We used five year intervals for voting and asked readers to choose the 5 most memorable characters from each group of 25 Oscar nominees.

If you're looking for these polls to provide a "face" of an era it looks like Julie Andrews wins the early 60s -- she was thoroughly modern back then! -- and Faye Dunaway takes over from there for a long run at the top (1966-1980) [* indicates that it was an Oscar winning role.]

1961-1965

Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) Breakfast at Tiffany's Mary Poppins* (Julie Andrews) Mary Poppins [tie] Maria Von Trapp (Julie Andrews) The Sound of Music »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Music in the movies: more scores of John Barry 1968-1979

15 August 2011 4:16 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our round-up of John Barry’s non-Bond movie scores continues with a look at some romantic compositions from the disco decade…

As we embark on the fourth part of our appreciation of John Barry’s career beyond Bond, we move into a decade renowned for its glitter balls, bell-bottoms and jiggle television. However, this phase of Barry’s career is representative of a burgeoning interest in more emotionally charged, fractured and complex ideas, viewed through the filter of a maturing, mellowing artist.

Even the most vibrant, exotic scores could not disguise the introspection and sensitivity of the man himself. He continued to chase universal themes – and he was still capable of conjuring up worlds of intrigue and drama – but the projects he gravitated towards more in the wake of Midnight Cowboy were those that allowed him to explore more intimate musical textures.

Barry still accepted a range of eclectic assignments, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Music in the movies: the scores of John Barry 1968-1979 part 1

8 August 2011 5:14 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our detailed look back over the non-Bond scores of John Barry continues with a look at his work between the years 1968 to 1979…

In the third part of our John Barry retrospective, we enter the late 60s and a surge of activity that would typify the composer’s output for nearly two decades. Despite the exacting nature of his commissions, he continued to build on his reputation with a succession of quality scores that stockpiled brilliant and unexpected surprises on top of unprecedented new ground. But all the while, he continued to strive for authenticity of arrangement and sincerity of expression. This phase demonstrates his broadening outlook but also reflects, in a profound way, the diversity of his musical influences.

His early output took inspiration from both the rhythm and blues of The Barry Seven and the popular rhythms of the time, such as Gene Vincent and American guitarist Duane Eddy, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Music in the movies: the scores of John Barry 1968-1979

8 August 2011 5:14 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our detailed look back over the non-Bond scores of John Barry continues with a look at his work between the years 1968 to 1979…

In the third part of our John Barry retrospective, we enter the late 60s and a surge of activity that would typify the composer’s output for nearly two decades. Despite the exacting nature of his commissions, he continued to build on his reputation with a succession of quality scores that stockpiled brilliant and unexpected surprises on top of unprecedented new ground. But all the while, he continued to strive for authenticity of arrangement and sincerity of expression. This phase demonstrates his broadening outlook but also reflects, in a profound way, the diversity of his musical influences.

His early output took inspiration from both the rhythm and blues of The Barry Seven and the popular rhythms of the time, such as Gene Vincent and American guitarist Duane Eddy, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Music in the movies: further scores of John Barry 1960-1967

1 August 2011 2:55 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We continue our unabashed appreciation of some of the highlights of composer John Barry’s early movie career beyond the remit of the Bond franchise...

In the second part of our look at John Barry's extraordinary back catalogue of movie scores, we concentrate on a few more of the films from the mid- to late sixties. This was the beginning of a phase of phenomenal output, as well as experimentation, signposting his continuing diversity of technique and his burgeoning sense of style. Following on from the success of Zulu, his was a reputation that was quickly gaining momentum and garnering feverish accolades.

Stylish, contemporary and full of energy, Barry played as hard as he worked, and this musical period took place in a blur of fast living and nights at the Pickwick Club with the likes of Michael Caine and Terence Stamp, sampling the delights of the sixties at »

Permalink | Report a problem


Contest Winner: "I Know Where I'm Going"

31 May 2011 9:19 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Eeep! I forgot to announce the contest winners for this new Katharine Hepburn "I Know Where I'm Going" bio from Charlotte Chandler. I asked participants to name their favorite performance from "Kate the Great" and I just now pulled the winners randomly from those contest entries.

Which Hepburn performances are favored by our three winners? Read on!

Annie in New York. She writes...

My favorite Katharine Hepburn performance is in Bringing Up Baby (1938). Reasons: The improvised line, "I was born on the side of a hill" when the heel on her shoe broke; the glorious close-up of her smiling face that brings the film to a complete halt just to luxuriate in it; "Did we get to the other side?".  It's her full commitment to every aspect of the funniest movie ever made that makes this my favorite Hepburn performance.

Seisgrados in Spain. He writes...

Leonor of Aquitania in The Lion in Winter »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

1-20 of 61 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners