For Love of Ivy (1968) - News Poster

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President Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and more remember Maya Angelou

President Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and more remember Maya Angelou
President Barack Obama is one of many who have offered words about Maya Angelou’s death, calling Angelou “a brilliant writer, a fierce friend, and a truly phenomenal woman” in a statement released today.

After news broke that Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86, Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Quincy Jones, and more released statements reacting to the celebrated poet’s death. Read them below, and check back for updates throughout the day:

President Barack Obama: “When her friend Nelson Mandela passed away last year, Maya Angelou wrote that ‘No sun outlasts its sunset, but will rise again, and bring the dawn.
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Sidney Poitier Was Born Today… Your Favorites Of His Films?

Today in history… February 20th, 1927, Sidney Poitier, a man who I’m sure needs absolutely no introduction on this website, was born in Miami, Florida. Happy 84th birthday Mr Poitier!

I’ve seen nearly all of his films, although it’s been months since I last revisited any of them. The last Sidney Poitier film I watched was Buck And The Preacher, some time last year. It’s one of my favorite Poitier films, along with In The Heat Of The Night, For Love Of Ivy, and Let’s Do It Again, the 2nd in the comedy/action trilogy of films he made with Bill Cosby in the 1970s.

I’d say that my preference leans towards his latter films – specifically those he had some creative control over, whether writing or directing, as the above films I listed indicate (In The Heat Of The Night aside).

Buck And The Preacher
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Jazz Singer Abbey Lincoln Died at Home

Jazz singer Abbey Lincoln has died at her New York home, aged 80. The star passed away at her Manhattan property on Saturday, August 14, her brother David Wooldridge confirms to The New York Times.

Born Anna Marie Wooldridge in Chicago in 1930, she released her debut album, "Abbey Lincoln's Affair - A Story of a Girl in Love", in 1956. Largely inspired by Billie Holiday, Lincoln went on to release more than 20 albums throughout her six-decade long career.

She also branched out into movies, starring opposite Sidney Poitier in 1968's "For Love of Ivy" and was nominated for a Golden Globe for her performance in the film. Lincoln married jazz musician Max Roach in 1962, but they divorced in 1970.

She is survived by her brothers David and Kenneth Wooldridge and her sister, Juanita Baker.
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Abbey Lincoln obituary

Jazz singer, actor and civil rights activist strongly influenced by Billie Holiday

If Abbey Lincoln was overwhelmed by the responsibility of being proclaimed "the last of the jazz singers", she never let it show. As her great contemporaries and principal influences among the classic female jazz vocalists fell away – with Billie Holiday the first to go, in 1959, and Betty Carter the last, in 1998 – Lincoln steadfastly maintained her dignified, almost solemn, focus; her tart, deftly timed Holiday-like inflections, and her commitment to songs that dug deeper into life's meanings than the usual lost-love exhalations.

And, like Ella Fitzgerald, who all her life took to a stage as if she were surprised to find anyone had come to see her, Lincoln became the opposite of a celebrated jazz diva. In some of her London performances during the 1990s, she would sit quietly beside the piano, tugging at her clothes, like someone who
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Abbey Lincoln, 1930 - 2010

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"Abbey Lincoln, a singer whose dramatic vocal command and tersely poetic songs made her a singular figure in jazz, died on Saturday in Manhattan," reports Nate Chinen in the New York Times. "She was 80 and lived on the Upper West Side." Her "career encompassed outspoken civil rights advocacy in the 1960s and fearless introspection in more recent years... She starred in the films Nothing But a Man, in 1964, and For Love of Ivy, opposite Sidney Poitier, in 1968."

Update, 8/15: A remembrance from Glenn Kenny, a bit of viewing from Phil Nugent and a profile to listen to from NPR.

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See full article at MUBI »

Your Favorite Sidney Poitier Films?

I revisited Buck And The Preacher over the weekend (thank you NetFlix Instant Watch), and, having seen nearly all of Sidney Poitier’s films, I’ll put this one right up there – along with other favorites, In The Heat Of The Night, For Love Of Ivy, and Let’s Do It Again, the 2nd in the comedy/action trilogy of films he made with Bill Cosby in the 1970s.

It only recently came to me that my preference leans towards his latter films – specifically those he had some creative control over, whether writing or directing, as the above films I listed indicate (In The Heat Of The Night aside).

Buck And The Preacher was his directorial debut (although it wasn’t originally planned that way), and a fine job I’d say he did with it. He also starred in the film, as Buck, alongside Harry Belafonte as the nutty preacher.
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

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