IMDb > Faces (1968/I)
Faces
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Faces (1968/I) More at IMDbPro »

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Faces -- An old married man leaves his wife for a younger woman. Shortly after, his ex-wife also begins a relationship with a younger partner. The film follows their struggles to find love amongst each other.

Overview

User Rating:
7.7/10   7,338 votes »
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Popularity: ?
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Director:
Writer:
John Cassavetes (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Faces on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
June 1968 (UK) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The Acclaimed Motion Picture
Plot:
A middle-aged man leaves his wife for a younger woman. Shortly after, his ex-wife also begins a relationship with a younger partner. The film follows their struggles to find love amongst each other. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 9 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
An American Masterwork See more (53 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

John Marley ... Richard Forst

Gena Rowlands ... Jeannie Rapp
Lynn Carlin ... Maria Forst
Fred Draper ... Freddie Draper

Seymour Cassel ... Chet

Val Avery ... Jim McCarthy

Dorothy Gulliver ... Florence
Joanne Moore Jordan ... Louise Draper

Darlene Conley ... Billy Mae
Gene Darfler ... Joe Jackson
Elizabeth Deering ... Stella
Ann Shirley (as Anne Shirley)
Dave Mazzie
Anita White
Julie Gambol
Edwin Sirianni
Liz Satriano
George Dunn ... Comedian (as George Dunne)
Jerry Howard
David Rowlands
Carolyn Fleming
James Bridges ... Extra (as Jim Bridges)
Kay Michaels
Don Kraatz
Laurie Mock ... Barmaid
John Hale
Christina Crawford ... Woman Scattering Coins on Bar
Midge Ware
George Sims ... Bartender
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Charles Akins ... (uncredited)

Nancy E. Barr ... Dancer at Nightclub (uncredited)

Don Siegel ... Extra at Whiskey A-Go-Go (uncredited)

Directed by
John Cassavetes 
 
Writing credits
John Cassavetes (written by)

Produced by
Maurice McEndree .... producer
Al Ruban .... associate producer
John Cassavetes .... producer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Al Ruban 
Maurice McEndree (uncredited)
Haskell Wexler (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Maurice McEndree 
Al Ruban 
John Cassavetes (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Phedon Papamichael  (as Phaedon Papamichael)
 
Set Decoration by
Lady Rowlands 
 
Makeup Department
Harold Chaleff .... hair stylist: Miss Carlin
 
Production Management
James Joyce .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jerry Howard .... assistant director
John Nastu .... assistant director
George O'Halloran .... first assistant director
James Victor .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Don Pike .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Charles Akins .... gaffer
Charles Akins .... key grip
John Bardwell .... still photographer
George Sims .... camera operator
 
Editorial Department
James Auker .... post-production
Jack Woods .... post-production
 
Music Department
Jack Ackerman .... musical director
Victor Arno .... musician: violin
Pete Candoli .... conductor
Pete Candoli .... musician: trumpet
Jack English .... musician: piano
Richard Grand .... assistant to musical director
Red Mitchell .... musician: bass guitar and guitarron
Ted Nash .... musician: tenor sax
Gary Nuttycomb .... musician: viola
Mischa Russell .... musician: violin
Victor Sazer .... musician: violin
Kenny Shroyer .... musician: trombone
Jerry Williams .... musician: drums
 
Other crew
Charles Akins .... stage manager
Dick Balduzzi .... pre-production
Pat Buckley .... production secretary
Bianca Chambers .... production secretary
Bud Cherry .... dialogue director
Carolyn Fleming .... assistant to producer
Liz Satriano .... production secretary
Pat Smith .... script supervisor
Nancy E. Barr .... production assistant (uncredited)
Steven Spielberg .... production assistant (uncredited)
 

DistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
130 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:M | Iceland:L | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | UK:X (original rating) | UK:15 (video rating) (1992) | USA:R

Did You Know?

Trivia:
First John Cassavetes film examining the theme of love. The relationships between men and women would regularly recur thematically in his work in such later Cassavetes films as Love Streams (1984), Minnie and Moskowitz (1971) and A Woman Under the Influence (1974).See more »
Quotes:
Richard Forst:What is it that, that weighs five thousand pounds and it's got a stick through it? A hippo popsicle.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in I Want More (1969)See more »
Soundtrack:
Love Is All You Really WantSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
45 out of 52 people found the following review useful.
An American Masterwork, 28 July 1999
Author: Dr.Mike from Chicago, IL

Faces is one of the first American films to reach to the >core of people's relationships. It provides wonderful insight into a lifestyle that is distinctly American. The detached way that the characters interact most of the time is only a logical conclusion of the commerce-driven world we live in. The film is personal in a way that many European films of the 1950's and 1960's were. Even the title suggests the intimacy of the film and its treatment of its characters.

Cassavettes must have been repulsed by the insincerity of the people who were surrounding him when he wrote Faces. Few films have so many moments where characters are together but not talking to each other. They are merely talking, or laughing, or singing, doing anything they can to avoid having to confront the other person. Only once, when the young lover boy talks about the mechanical nature of people in America, do we even get any hint that the filmmaker is put off by the behavior of his characters. The rest of the time he merely films them and shows us what they do. This unsentimental approach can leave the viewer feeling a bit odd, but it works very well in the end. By seeing these character's shortcomings without any hint of disapproval from the filmmaker, the viewer is forced to consider their own lives and the people around them. It allows for an honesty not found in any, I repeat ANY other American film of the 1960's. Even Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf has some indications of Nichols' attitude towards the material. Faces is just the facts.

I can only imagine the excitement that people interested in film must have felt upon the release of this film. Here was a personal, Bergman-esque film made about American people living American lives. (Note: Bergman is referenced during the film.) The quiet desperation of the housewife, the empty feeling inside the businessman, the false nature of each and every relationship speak volumes about the reality of American family life. How refreshing it must have been to see these topics approached in an American film.

The film's style is notable as well. It is independent in every sense of the word. It uses a fluid camera, freeform acting, and natural lighting. In many ways, it paved the way for a lot of the young filmmakers of the 1970's by providing them with a stylistic freedom that Hollywood had previously ignored. Today, it appears as a fairly standard film in terms of style, but at the time it was groundbreaking and exciting. In fact, it retains that excitement today, although the real revelation is how much has been taken from the film and used by others.

Faces is a great movie experience. Anyone frustrated with the lack of real connection in their lives should see it, if only to realize that many others are suffering from the same fate.

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