IMDb > Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968)
Dracula Has Risen from the Grave
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Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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6.6/10   3,582 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Anthony Hinds (screenplay)
Bram Stoker (based on the character created by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Dracula Has Risen from the Grave on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
6 February 1969 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
You just can't keep a good man down. See more »
Plot:
When his castle is exorcised, Dracula plots his revenge against the Monsignor who performed the rites... See more » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
The best of Lee's Dracula sequels See more (69 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Christopher Lee ... Dracula
Rupert Davies ... Monsignor Ernest Mueller
Veronica Carlson ... Maria Mueller
Barbara Ewing ... Zena
Barry Andrews ... Paul
Ewan Hooper ... Priest
Marion Mathie ... Anna Mueller
Michael Ripper ... Max
John D. Collins ... Student
George A. Cooper ... Landlord
Christopher Cunningham ... Farmer (as Chris Cunningham)
Norman Bacon ... Mute Boy

Directed by
Freddie Francis 
 
Writing credits
Anthony Hinds (screenplay) (as John Elder)

Bram Stoker (based on the character created by)

Produced by
Aida Young .... producer
 
Original Music by
James Bernard 
 
Cinematography by
Arthur Grant (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Spencer Reeve 
 
Makeup Department
Wanda Kelley .... hair stylist
Heather Nurse .... make-up
Rosemarie McDonald Peattie .... make-up (as Rosemarie McDonald-Peattie)
 
Production Management
Christopher Sutton .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Dennis Robertson .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Arthur Banks .... construction manager
 
Sound Department
Ken Rawkins .... sound recordist
Wilfred Thompson .... sound editor
Harry Fairbairn .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Frank George .... special effects
Bert Luxford .... special effects (uncredited)
James Snow .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Peter Melrose .... matte artist
Bob Cuff .... matte artist (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Peter Diamond .... stunts (uncredited)
Eddie Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Moray Grant .... camera operator
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Jill Thompson .... wardrobe mistress
 
Editorial Department
James Needs .... supervising editor
 
Music Department
Philip Martell .... musical supervisor
 
Other crew
Doris Martin .... continuity
Kevin Francis .... runner (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
92 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:M | Canada:PG (Manitoba) | Canada:G (Nova Scotia) | Canada:G (Quebec) (2004) | Canada:PG (Ontario) (video rating) (1993) | Finland:(Banned) (cut) (1969) | Finland:(Banned) (uncut) (1969) | Germany:16 (DVD release) | Netherlands:16 | New Zealand:R16 | Norway:16 | Singapore:PG | South Africa:13V | UK:15 (video rating) | UK:X (cut) | USA:G (certificate #21909) | West Germany:16 (VHS rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Christopher Lee loved to recount the following tale: Hammer was given a Queen's Award to Industry while shooting the final scenes of Dracula impaled on the rocks, with a group of British government dignitaries watching as Lee thrashed around screaming and pouring with gore. After the scene wrapped, a minister turned to wife and said, "That man is a member of my club."See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: The cross that the Monsignor takes from the church is clearly made of wood with gold foil and/or paint (apparent from the ease with which he handles it, and also when it is seen in close-up as he converses with the frightened Priest on the mountainside). However, when it falls from the cliff in the final sequence, the (over-dubbed) sound it makes as it hits the rocks suggests it to be made of solid metal.See more »
Quotes:
Dracula:There is a girl...
Zena:What girl?
Dracula:The niece of the monsignor.
Zena:[with disgust] Maria?
Dracula:Bring her to me.
Zena:But what do you want her for? You've got me!
Dracula:[slaps her in the face] Bring her to me!
See more »
Soundtrack:
Students' Beer SongSee more »

FAQ

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12 out of 13 people found the following review useful.
The best of Lee's Dracula sequels, 22 September 2007
Author: TrevorAclea from London, England

For the US release of Hammer's fourth Dracula film (only the third to actually feature Christopher Lee, the Count sitting out Brides of Dracula), Warner Bros. used a one-sheet of a woman's neck with a sticking plaster on it, following the title Dracula Has Risen From the Grave with the single word 'Obviously.' The film itself, however, is anything but tongue-in-cheek, and played deadly straight with a conviction the series gradually lost over the years. It's probably the best-looking of all the Hammer Dracula sequels, and also the first where Christopher Lee actually speaks. As usual he's almost a background figure for much of the film, with the bulk of the film carried by Barry Andrews' atheist student romancing Veronica Carlson's niece of Rupert Davies' Monsignor, who inadvertently starts the blood flowing again when his attempt to exorcise Dracula's castle only results in the Count being revived from his icy grave by blood from a convenient cut. Finding himself cast out of his home and aided by Ewan Hooper terrified priest (Renfield presumably being otherwise engaged), Dracula determines to take his revenge on Davies and his kin, stopping off en route for a light snack with Barbara Ewing's busty redheaded barmaid.

With a prologue that takes place before Dracula, Prince of Darkness and the main body of the film taking place a year later, it takes some liberties with the vampire mythology: the revived Dracula's first appearance is as a reflection, he has no problem removing crosses from willing girls' necks while a stake alone is no longer enough to kill him: you have to pray as well, which is a bit of a problem when your hero doesn't believe in God. Yet they're not as jarring as they might be, the latter resulting in one particularly memorably gory sequence. The change in director from Terence Fisher, sadly in decline at that time and unavailable due to a car crash, to Freddie Francis gives the film less of a production-line feel than most of the studio's Dracula series and, despite an awkward filter in some scenes and a distinctly jaundiced look for the Count, the film has a much more expansive look and feel almost unique in the series, with a striking and well-employed rooftop set courtesy of undervalued production designer Bernard Robinson and some relatively unfamiliar Pinewood standing sets rather than the overused backlot at Bray. He gets good performances too, with a particularly nice turn from Michael Ripper as an amiable innkeeper (as opposed to his usual miserable and terrified innkeepers).

Unfortunately while the PAL boasts excellent colour and definition, some shots look oddly distorted, as if stretched, and the sound wanders in and out of synch far too often for comfort. On the plus side it does restore the censor cuts of about half a dozen gallons of blood spurting from Dracula's chest after he gets staked and includes the original trailer.

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See more (69 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
This month on TCM utfan62
Mistake adds depth salamanderee
Definitely my favorite Dracula movie! wylieperlitz
G-rating on THIS one? peterkarlsson79
Barbara Ewing....So Hot harry44mag
What year does this story take place? eastcoastguyz
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