6.7/10
2,451
51 user 16 critic

The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968)

PG-13 | | Drama, History, War | 11 October 1968 (USA)
A chronicle of events that led to the British involvement in the Crimean War against Russia and which led to the siege of Sevastopol and the fierce Battle of Balaclava on October 25, 1854 ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (additional source material "The Reason Why") (as Cecil Woodham Smith)
Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 6 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Clarissa Morris
...
...
Jill Bennett ...
Mrs. Duberly
...
Ben Aris ...
Lt. Maxse
Micky Baker ...
Trooper Metcalfe
...
Paymaster Capt. Duberly
Leo Britt ...
General Scarlett
Mark Burns ...
Captain Morris
John J. Carney ...
Trooper Mitchell (as John Carney)
Helen Cherry ...
Lady Scarlett
...
Trooper (as Christopher Chittel)
Ambrose Coghill ...
Lt. Col. Douglas
Edit

Storyline

A chronicle of events that led to the British involvement in the Crimean War against Russia and which led to the siege of Sevastopol and the fierce Battle of Balaclava on October 25, 1854 which climaxed with the heroic, but near-disastrous cavalry charge made by the British Light Brigade against a Russian artillery battery in a small valley which resulted in the near-destruction of the brigade due to error of judgment and rash planning on part by the inept British commanders. Written by Matthew Patay

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

"Theirs not to reason why..."

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 October 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Carga da Brigada Ligeira  »

Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The film began as a Michael Powell project, but Powell gave up after his preferred screenwriter John Witham died during pre-production. See more »

Goofs

The character called Featherstonehaugh (played by Corin Redgrave) has his name pronounced more or less as it is written, with four syllables. An upper-class Englishman of the mid-19th century (or, indeed, today) would pronounce it "Fanshawe". See more »

Quotes

Lord Cardigan: [during the Battle of the Alma] Lucan, you're a stewstick.
Lord Lucan aka George Charles Bingham: Fetch off!
Lord Cardigan: Poltroon.
Lord Lucan aka George Charles Bingham: Bum-roll!
Lord Cardigan: Why don't you draw your horse from round your ears? Bring your head out of his arse.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Closing credits roll over a drawing of a dead horse, with the buzzing of flies in the soundtrack. See more »

Connections

Featured in The 100 Greatest War Films (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Turkish Music
(uncredited)
Traditional
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Accurate and brilliant
18 April 2006 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

My favourite subject is history (especially the Victorian era)and I was very pleased that Tony Richardson made this excellent film historically accurate.No Hollywood style poetic license.Some of the quotes that Capt.Nolan said were apparently excerpts from a book he wrote on cavalry warfare (which I have never found).I wondered how he (Richardson) would handle the fact that no one actually knows whether Cardigan reached the Russian guns or not and at what stage (if any) he turned back,but he seems to have glossed over that issue.I can only give this film 10 out of 10 because it is simply brilliant.The casting was superb with what I think was Trevor Howards best ever role,and Harry Andrews as Lord Lucan was perfect.I watched the Errol Flynn version of the events the other day and they seemed to have gone out of their way to make it as far from the truth as possible,right down to the uniforms and regiments involved.So well done to Tony Richardson etc.for making what is so far my favourite war film.Since writing my earlier comments I have discovered that Capt.Nolans book is still available "CAVALRY,ITS HISTORY AND TACTICS"and I would dearly love to read it but it costs £80!.I have also been told that the scene where Cardigan does actually reach the Russian guns was in fact edited from the final version.I thank other people for the comments and my learning more about a fascinating event in military history


15 of 20 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?