This groundbreaking series had three rotating stars, who were featured in independent episodes tied together by a loose common theme. The commonality was Howard Publications, the self-made ... See full summary »
Reviews

Episodes

Seasons


Years



3   2   1  
1971   1970   1969   1968  
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

McMillan & Wife (1971–1977)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

San Francisco Police Commissioner Stewart "Mac" McMillan and his amateur detective wife keep their marriage unpredictable while solving the city's most baffling crimes.

Stars: Rock Hudson, John Schuck, Susan Saint James
Ironside (1967–1975)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Wheelchair-bound detective Robert T. Ironside battles the bad guys on the streets of San Francisco.

Stars: Raymond Burr, Don Galloway, Don Mitchell
Supercarrier (TV Series 1988)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

The lives and missions of the crew of a large US Navy aircraft carrier.

Stars: Ken Olandt, Cec Verrell, John David Bland
McCloud (1970–1977)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Sam McCloud is a Marshal from a Taos, New Mexico, who takes a temporary assignment in the New York City Police. His keen sense of detail and detecting subtle clues, learned from his experience, enable him to nab unsuspecting criminals despite his unbelieving boss.

Stars: Dennis Weaver, J.D. Cannon, Terry Carter
The Virginian (1962–1971)
Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

The Shiloh Ranch in Wyoming Territory of the 1890s is owned in sequence by Judge Garth, the Grainger brothers, and Col. MacKenzie. It is the setting for a variety of stories, many more ... See full summary »

Stars: James Drury, Doug McClure, Lee J. Cobb
The High Chaparral (1967–1971)
Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

The Cannon family runs the High Chaparral Ranch in the Arizona Territory in 1870s. Big John wants to establish his cattle empire despite Indian hostility. He's aided by brother Buck and son... See full summary »

Stars: Leif Erickson, Cameron Mitchell, Henry Darrow
Hunter (1984–1991)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Rick Hunter is a renegade cop who breaks the rules and takes justice into his own hands. Partnered with the equally stunning and rebellious Sgt. McCall, the tough-minded duo set out to crack down on L.A.'s slimiest criminals.

Stars: Fred Dryer, Stepfanie Kramer, Charles Hallahan
Daniel Boone (1964–1970)
Adventure | History | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Frontier hero Daniel Boone conducts surveys and expeditions around Boonesborough, running into both friendly and hostile Indians, just before and during the Revolutionary War.

Stars: Fess Parker, Patricia Blair, Darby Hinton
Mariah (TV Series 1987)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  

The work of the prison staff at Mariah State Penitentiary.

Stars: John Getz, Tovah Feldshuh, Philip Baker Hall
Under Cover (TV Series 1991)
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

Short lived (six weeks) show about a husband-and-wife team of spies working for the National Intelligence Agency. The stories revolved around Dylan and Kate and their personal lives in ... See full summary »

Stars: Joher Coleman, Nick Faltas, Linda Purl
Joe's World (1979–1980)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

Short-lived situation comedy about the owner of a house painting contracting firm who is trying to support a wife and five children, whose ages range from 9 to 23.

Stars: Ramon Bieri, K Callan, Christopher Knight
Pig Sty (TV Series 1995)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Five slobby friends share an apartment in Manhattan inherited by bartender Randy. Innocent intern Joe is from Iowa, PJ sponges off his parents. DA Johnny and adman Cal are the other roomies. Randy has a crush on building super Tess.

Stars: David Arnott, Matthew Borlenghi, Timothy Fall
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Glenn Howard / ... (41 episodes, 1968-1971)
...
 Peggy Maxwell (32 episodes, 1968-1971)
...
 Dan Farrell (26 episodes, 1968-1971)
...
 Jeff Dillon (17 episodes, 1968-1970)
Edit

Storyline

This groundbreaking series had three rotating stars, who were featured in independent episodes tied together by a loose common theme. The commonality was Howard Publications, the self-made publishing empire of Glenn Howard. Episodes featuring Howard focused on his business and political confrontations and his flamboyant lifestyles. Other episodes featured Jeff Dillon, a crusading investigative reporter, or Dan Farrell. Farrell was a retired FBI agent who used his position as the editor of "Crime Magazine" to wage a literary war against organized crime. The series had several semi-regulars who were featured in one or more of the plot threads, including editorial assistant Peggy Maxwell, and junior reporters Joe Sample, Andy Hill and Ross Craig. Written by Marg Baskin <marg@asd.raytheon.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Adventure | Sci-Fi

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 September 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Audacia es el juego  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(76 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Anthony Franciosa was fired during the show's third season. Instead of being replaced by one actor, he was replaced by a series of actors filling in on his rotation, including Robert Culp twice appearing as reporter Paul Tyler. Peter Falk as reporter Lewis Corbett, and Robert Wagner as reporter David Corey, each were billed as 'Guest Starring in...'. Earlier in Season Two both 'Darren McGavin' (as freelance newsman Sam Hardy in 'Goodbye Harry', and 'Vera Miles' as reporter Hilary Vanderman in 'Man of The People', took guest starring roles (both put under the 'Gene Barry' segment as he made cameo appearances in each). See more »


Soundtracks

The Name of The Game Theme
by Dave Grusin
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

The best show ever- but not forever
2 September 2002 | by (N Syracuse NY) – See all my reviews

When this debuted in 1968, I thought it was the best TV show I'd ever seen. It had a "wheel" format of the kind pioneered by Warner Bros. a decade before, which allowed more time to film each episode and allowed the show to attain higher quality than the average TV show. You could also do any kind of story on it. Glen Howard, (Gene Barry) could get involved with boardroom battles, political scandals in Washington, could travel to anywhere in the world. He was involved in everything from a campus protest to a murder investigation in and English country house to the "Prague Spring" to a flashback episode that took place in the old west to a Phil Wylie vision of a post-apocalyptic world. Dan Farrell, (Robert Stack), was Elliot Ness with a typewriter, going wherever crimes were committed to battle the bad guys with the truth and comfort the afflicted. Jeff Dillon, (Anthony Franciosa), was more interested in afflicting the comfortable as a reporter for People Magazine, (Time/Life's version didn't exist yet), His was perhaps the most open-ended job of all. He could be doing a personality piece on a show business icon, going undercover at a paramilitary training ground, investigating a phony doctor, covering the coverage of a search for someone lost in the woods, (an updated version of "Ace in the Hole"). Susan Saint James was the real star of the show as she was assigned as the assistant to each in time for their latest adventure, (a strange practice, it seems to me, but she was always welcome).

The whole thing was packaged in a glittery covering of jazzy music and artsy-craftsy direction, (including by a young Stephen Spielberg), that made it all seem "hip" and exciting. Looking back at it now, that's one of the problems. It's so aggressively contemporary that it's now very dated, both in style and attitudes. The "Man From Uncle" doesn't date because it was never realistic to begin with. "Adam 12" doesn't date because it was never about issues. The things those cops dealt with is the same thing they'd deal with today. "Lou Grant " doesn't date as much because it was presented in a straight forward manner. "Name of the Game" seems stuck in it's own time.

Another problem is that it got more and more wordy as the show went on. it started out as that rare dinosaur, the 90 minute drama. Coming up with movie length stories on a weekly basis was tough and there was a lot of "fill" in many of the episodes. NBC, experimenting with the notion that longer shows might be cheaper because they meant less shows, eventually expanded it to a series of "special" two hour shows, which not only bloated it more but took it past many bedtimes. What finally killed it was the expense. It was the most expensive show in TV history to that time, (and probably would still be with inflation factored out). it had to be a huge ratings hit to "make it" for a long run. It wasn't and it didn't. But, for a while there, it was something special.


6 of 9 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
L.A. : 2017 ---Is this the story line as I remember? pyxis1
Los Angeles 2017 brian_mack
I Love You Billy Baker JimSpy
Where can I find a copy of this? stepstonefilms
episode concerning lost Shakespeare manuscript neilh333
Copy of The Savage Eye RosieDe
Discuss The Name of the Game (1968) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page