Julia Baker is a young African-American woman working as a nurse. She is also a widow (her husband died in Vietnam) trying to raise a young son alone.

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3   2   1  
1971   1970   1969   1968  
Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 8 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Julia Baker (86 episodes, 1968-1971)
...
 Dr. Morton Chegley / ... (86 episodes, 1968-1971)
Marc Copage ...
 Corey Baker (86 episodes, 1968-1971)
Michael Link ...
 Earl J. Waggedorn / ... (81 episodes, 1968-1971)
Betty Beaird ...
 Marie Waggedorn (70 episodes, 1968-1971)
...
 Hannah Yarby / ... (48 episodes, 1968-1970)
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Storyline

Julia Baker is a young African-American woman working as a nurse. She is also a widow (her husband died in Vietnam) trying to raise a young son alone.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Diahann Carroll is a nurse with two men in her life - her boss (a cranky but lovable M.D.) and her six year old son. Premiere. (season 1)

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

TV-G
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Details

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Release Date:

17 September 1968 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Mama's Man  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

First TV series starring an African American woman in a professional, non-stereotypical role. (The first TV series starring a black woman was Beulah (1950), variously starring Ethel Waters, Hattie McDaniel, Louise Beavers and Amanda Randolph, in the title role as a comic maid.) See more »

Quotes

Julia Baker: Did they tell you I'm colored?
Dr. Chegley: What color are you?
Julia Baker: Wh-hy, I'm Negro.
Dr. Chegley: Have you always been a Negro, or are you just trying to be fashionable?
See more »

Connections

Featured in TV in Black: The First Fifty Years (2004) See more »

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User Reviews

You catch more flies with honey!
29 November 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I can't believe some of the vapid comments about this wonderfully gentle and sweet ground-breaking show! I remember watching Julia when I was young and being very impressed by its cast and storyline; they were both very creative. Why do you make fun of it because it wasn't about angry, bitter black people with chips on their shoulders, but about a young black mother who was a nurse and her little son trying to live upbeat, positive, fulfilling lives while the male head of the family was serving his country in Vietnam. This was a landmark show for America and deserves more respect! This show was like a Serenity Prayer for race relations! Not all "progress" is made by angry, bitter, or violent people protesting in the marketplace. Real progress is often made one by one by individuals who can see past the divides to reach out on a daily basis to people of different races and religions, with a sense of goodwill and humility.

So it was with Julia. You catch more flies with honey instead of vinegar and I'm sure this show did more to increase understanding among whites for the everyday concerns of black folk than all the Jesse Jacksons and Malcolm X's in the world!


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