Up the Junction (1968) - News Poster

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Ken Loach's Poor Cow reviewed - archive, 1967

8 December 1967 While praising Terence Stamp’s acting, along with parts of the dialogue, Richard Roud finds Poor Cow ‘downright awful’

If I hadn’t seen Poor Cow (London Pavilion) with my own eyes, I would never have believed that a film with so much to offer could ultimately be so downright awful. I never saw any of the television films by the writer-director team, Nell Dunn and Kenneth Loach; Up the Junction was supposed to have been quite something, and there were moments in Poor Cow that hinted at a really penetrating examination of the mentality of the petty criminal.

Related: Poor Cow review – Ken Loach's debut masterpiece, still so fresh and artful

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jools Holland webchat – your questions answered on punk, Amy Winehouse and his favourite rapper

The bandleader and television presenter has tickled ivories with the biggest names in music. He told us which musician he’s most in awe of, what late legend he’d like to spend eternity with and his peculiar fear of dying

1.05pm GMT

Thank you so much for joining me and taking the time to think up your eloquent questions. I hope you found my answers satisfactory. I have the honour to remain your humble and obedient servant. I'm sorry there wasn't time to answer them all.

1.04pm GMT

25aubrey asks:

Of all the people you’ve sat alongside tickling the ivories with, who were you most in awe of?

I think many of us will be in awe of the people who we have idolised since our childhood. I remember listening to Gladys Knight when I was a teenager and going to see her at the Lewisham Odeon. So
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Karlovy Vary Film Festival Honors Talent Working in Front of and Behind the Camera

Karlovy Vary Film Festival Honors Talent Working in Front of and Behind the Camera
Casey Affleck

President’s Award

An Academy Award-winner for his role in “Manchester by the Sea” (2016), Affleck will receive his kudo prior to a screening of “A Ghost Story,” in which he stars. Affleck, along with helmer-writer David Lowery, will introduce the film. Affleck starred in Lowery’s debut film “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” (2013) and recently completed production on Lowery’s “The Old Man and the Gun.”

Like his older brother, multi-hyphenate Ben, Casey Affleck has a parallel career as a writer-producer-director. He is in post on his second feature as a helmer-writer, “The Light of My Life,” in which he also stars.

Related

Future Frames Showcase at Karlovy Vary Casts the Spotlight on Promising Creative Talent

James Newton Howard

Crystal Globe

American composer and songwriter Howard will conduct the Czech National Symphony Orchestra in a performance of his music for the film “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” in front of Hotel Thermal on June 30, during the fest’s opening. Howard is currently preparing for his first live concert tour, a celebration of career highlights, with music, spoken word and video, that will visit 20 European cities.

Howard has composed music for more than 120 films, including Academy Award-nominated scores for “Defiance,” “Michael Clayton,” “The Village,” “The Fugitive,” “The Prince of Tides” and “My Best Friend’s Wedding” — not to mention Oscar-nominated songs for “Junior” and “One Fine Day.”

In addition to his contributions to film and television music, the Emmy- and Grammy-winning Howard has also composed concert pieces for the Pacific Symphony.

Paul Laverty

Crystal Globe

Laverty wrote the scripts for 12 features and two short films directed by Ken Loach, beginning with “Carla’s Song” (1996). Their most recent collaboration, “I, Daniel Blake” (2016), won the Palme d’Or at Cannes.

Laverty wrote the screenplay for Loach’s first Palme d’Or winner, “The Wind That Shakes the Barley” (2006). His credits with Loach include “My Name Is Joe,” (1998), a Cannes lead actor-winner for Peter Mullan and Cannes screenplay winner “Sweet Sixteen” (2002).

He also writes screenplays for his partner, the Spanish director and actress Icíar Bollaín.

Ken Loach

Crystal Globe

An activist as well as one of Britain’s most celebrated directors, Loach worked briefly in theater before starting as a director for BBC television in the early 1960s. There, he helmed ground-breaking dramas such as “Up the Junction” and “Cathy Come Home.” The impact of the latter led to a change in Britain’s homeless laws. Acclaimed early features such as “Poor Cow” (1967) and “Kes” (1969) brought his trademarks of social realism and compassion to the big screen.

Even though Loach’s 50-plus-year career includes a dark period when he couldn’t get a project off the ground and he directed commercials to support his family, he has been extraordinarily prolific. Undoubtedly, this is due in part to his on-going collaboration with producer Rebecca O’Brien and long-term partnerships with screenwriters including Barry Hines, Jim Allen and perhaps most fruitfully, Paul Laverty. Loach is also known for introducing exciting new acting talents.

Jeremy Renner

President’s Award

Actor, producer, musician and two-time Oscar-nominee Renner will receive his kudo at the fest’s closing gala on July 8. Renner will also introduce the crime thriller “Wind River,” directed by Taylor Sheridan.

Known for his intensity and ability to fully embody the characters he portrays, Renner received early critical acclaim as a serial killer in “Dahmer” (2002). He later established himself through roles in action and war movies, garnering an Oscar nomination for lead actor in Kathryn Bigelow’s war tale “The Hurt Locker” (2008). A supporting actor nom followed two years later for Ben Affleck’s bank heist drama “The Town” (2010).

Renner’s extensive filmography balances big-budget blockbusters such as “The Avengers” and “Mission: Impossible” series with more complex roles in “American Hustle” and “Arrival.”

In 2012, he formed the production company The Combine, with partner Don Handfield, to create, develop and produce high-quality, character-driven content for mainstream audiences.

Uma Thurman

President’s Award

The sensual, statuesque American actress and producer Uma Thurman will receive her honor on June 30, during the fest’s opening night. An Oscar-nominee for Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” (1994), Thurman’s memorable acting career is notable for her collaboration with iconic helmers.

Thurman was only a teenager when she made an impact in Stephen Frears’ “Dangerous Liaisons” (1988) and Terry Gilliam’s surreal “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen” (1988). However, the part of Mia Wallace in Tarantino’s sensational “Pulp Fiction” marked a turning point, garnering her numerous awards and nominations. Another successful Tarantino collaboration followed nearly a decade later with the cult double-header: “Kill Bill: Vols. 1 and 2” (2003, 2004). She received two Golden Globe nominations for her role as The Bride.

Thurman ultimately nabbed a Golden Globe for for her role in Mira Nair’s made-for-tv feature “Hysterical Blindness” (2002). She produced “The Accidental Husband” (2008) and the forthcoming “Girl Soldier.”

Václav Vorlíček

President’s Award

Renowned for his work for younger audiences, director-writer Vorlíček, 87, will receive an honor for his artistic contribution to Czech film.

Vorlíček teamed with writer and director Miloš Macourek, to form an original creative partnership responsible for a distinctive chapter in the development of Czech film. Their poetic vision, in which real life comes up against elements of fantasy, remains unique to this day.

Prime examples of Vorlíček and Macourek’s work include the “comic book” comedy “Who Wants to Kill Jessie?” (1966); the sci-fi comedy “You Are a Widow, Sir!” (1970).

Another comedy that employs fairytale motifs in contemporary Prague titled “How to Drown Dr. Mracek, the Lawyer” (1974); the TV series “Arabela” (1979-80); and “Rumburak” (1985).

Vorlíček is also known for his fairytale films, especially the comedy “The Girl on the Broomstick” (1971) and “Three Wishes for Cinderella” (1973), now a perennially popular Christmas classic on Czech television.

Related storiesFuture Frames Showcase at Karlovy Vary Casts the Spotlight on Promising Creative TalentKarlovy Vary International Film Festival Celebrates Critics Choice MoviesKarlovy Vary International Film Festival Showcases Stories of Social Turmoil
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tom Clegg obituary

Director who launched The Sweeney and was in demand for many television action series

The television director Tom Clegg, who has died aged 81, gained a reputation for his expert handling of action on screen, in work ranging from the pilot episode of The Sweeney, featuring John Thaw and Dennis Waterman as tough, no-nonsense detectives, to the swashbuckling Sharpe television films, following the daring exploits of a British officer (Sean Bean) in the Napoleonic wars. “Action isn’t just about fights,” Clegg told Rachel Murrell, author of Sharpe’s Story: The Making of a Hero (1996). “Action is what moves the story on dramatically. Just because people are rushing around, [it] doesn’t make it action. A good argument between Sharpe and Hakeswill can have as much action as the Chosen Men running across a battlefield.”

Clegg directed Regan, the 1974 pilot of The Sweeney, which featured Thaw as the detective inspector of the title,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Terence Stamp in Ken Loach's 1967 film Poor Cow – video

Released in 1967, Poor Cow was Ken Loach’s first cinema feature, after a string of successful TV productions. Adapted from a novel by Nell Dunn (whose earlier short story collection, Up the Junction, had already been filmed by Loach), Poor Cow featured Terence Stamp as a robber who starts a relationship with a single mother, played by Carol White (who again had previously collaborated with Loach, on Cathy Come Home). Poor Cow is released on 24 June, with Terence Stamp and Nell Dunn attending a preview screening on 23 June at the Barbican, London

• Warning: this clip contains scenes of domestic violence

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Versus: The Life and Films of Ken Loach’ Trailer and Clips Examine an Iconic Career

For the last half-a-century, Ken Loach has built up an iconic body of work, examining social issues through a realist approach in both drama and romance. From his landmark Kes to his double Palme d’Or win for The Wind That Shakes the Barley and this year’s I, Daniel Blake (our review), it’s the ideal time to get a definitive documentary of his career and one looks to have arrived with Versus: The Life and Films of Ken Loach.

In the works before his Palme d’Or win this year, it comes from director Louise Osmond, who helmed the heartwarming documentary Dark Horse, released last month in the United States. While his new documentary doesn’t have U.S. distribution yet, it’s already in theaters in the U.K. and so we have a new trailer and batch of clips. Featuring interviews with the director and his close collaborators (and adversaries), check out everything below.

Versus presents a surprisingly candid behind-the-scenes account of Ken Loach’s career as he prepares to release his latest feature film I, Daniel Blake, later this year. Director Louise Osmond was granted exclusive access on set and uses this as a starting point to look at Loach’s career, from his first job as understudy in a Kenneth Williams revue to ground-breaking TV dramas like Up The Junction and Cathy Come Home and later as an award- winning feature director of films like Kes, Riff-Raff, The Wind That Shakes the Barley, and The Angels’ Share. As well as inter-views with Loach, Osmond talks with a host of his friends, adversaries, actors and collaborators. This year will see Ken Loach celebrate his 80th birthday, release his 50th major work and commemorate Cathy Come Home’s 50th anniversary in November. Versus is more than just a document of Loach’s work but a playful study on the process and struggles of creating such a unique body of work. I, Daniel Blake won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Versus: The Life and Films of Ken Loach is now in theaters in the U.K. and is seeking U.S. distribution.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Versus: The Life and Films of Ken Loach review – tribute to a cinematic giant

A look back at the Palme d’Or-winning director’s 52-year career underlines his creative importance to film and beyond

This spry, sharp-witted documentary couldn’t be more timely. An affectionate appraisal of the work of Ken Loach, and an insight into the man himself, it reaches cinemas just after his most recent feature, I, Daniel Blake, won the Palme d’Or at Cannes. It is the second time Loach has scored the top prize at the world’s most prestigious film festival and it underlines the fact that now, perhaps more than ever, we need compassionate, angry voices like his.

The making of I, Daniel Blake, which brought the 79-year-old Loach out of retirement to rail against punitive Tory austerity policies and their ramifications, forms a central component of this documentary. But the real treats here for fans are the well-chosen clips from his incendiary early work for the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes Winner Ken Loach’s Producer Rebecca O’Brien on Their 30-Year Film Partnership

Cannes Winner Ken Loach’s Producer Rebecca O’Brien on Their 30-Year Film Partnership
Friday sees the release in the U.K. of a documentary celebrating the 50-year career of British director Ken Loach, whose 80th birthday is this month and whose social-realist drama “I, Daniel Blake” recently won Cannes Film Festival’s Palme d’Or. Variety spoke to Loach’s long-time producer Rebecca O’Brien at Sixteen Films about the director’s work, their filmmaking partnership spanning almost 30 years, and the impact that winning the Palme d’Or could have on “I, Daniel Blake.”

Loach has had 13 films in competition at Cannes, all but one of them produced by O’Brien, starting with 1990’s Jury Prize winner “Hidden Agenda” and including 2006 Palme d’Or winner “The Wind That Shakes the Barley.” When O’Brien first started to work with Loach in 1987, he was finding it almost impossible to attract backing for his feature films and documentaries as his radical left-wing perspective fell out
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Handgun’ Review

Stars: Karen Young, Clayton Day, Suzie Humphreys, Helena Humann, Ben Jones | Written and Directed by Tony Garrett

With one broken relationship still fresh in her mind, Kathleen Sullivan (Young) is in no mood to take on a new boyfriend. Larry (Day) however will not tolerate sexual rebuffs; rape is his means of exercising what he regards as a male prerogative. Consumed by anger and hungry for vengeance, Kathleen now finds she must take matters into her own hands.

The film debut of Karen Young, who would later go on to star in Birdy, Daylight and The Sopranos, is an uncompromising look at America’s hand gun culture through the eyes of a school teacher coming to terms with being raped. Helmed by British director Tony Garnett in the heart of Texas using a mix of actors and local people, Handgun is unlike any other rape/revenge thriller that has come before or since…
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Up the Junction's Tony Garnett reveals mother's backstreet abortion death

Producer who edited Ken Loach's 1965 TV drama about illegal abortion reveals own mother died two days after operation

The story editor of Up the Junction, the groundbreaking 1960s BBC drama dealing with backstreet abortion, has talked publicly for the first time of the personal tragedy that motivated him to get this and other politically challenging work on screen.

Tony Garnett, 77, the veteran TV and film producer with credits ranging from Kes and Cathy Come Home to This Life, revealed to the Guardian that his mother died of septicaemia, two days after a backstreet abortion during the German bombing of British cities in the second world war.

Garnett, then a child of five, was in bed with his mother the night she died. His father, who worked as a munitions worker, committed suicide less than a month later.

"There was me and my little brother and [my parents] thought another baby in those circumstances too much.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Television producer Tony Garnett: 'I'm only interested in love and politics'

As the BFI celebrates his 50 years' work, the man behind Cathy Come Home reveals the tragedy that changed his world

Television has treated Tony Garnett well over the past 50 years. He lives in an apartment close to the Ritz Hotel, where Margaret Thatcher died, a far cry from his working class childhood roots in Erdington, Birmingham. His local cafe is Fortnum & Mason, where he wields a silver teapot with aplomb, but he still declares: "I am a revolutionary socialist. I think our society would benefit from fundamental change."

Charming, kindly, but still angry after all these years, Garnett, 77, was a leader of the generation of radical TV creatives who addressed big social and political issues in their influential BBC dramas of the 1960s and 70s. His work is about to be celebrated in a two-month season, Seeing Red, at London's BFI.

The season opens with his explosive dramas for the BBC's Wednesday Play,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Television producer Tony Garnett: 'I'm only interested in love and politics'

As the BFI celebrates his 50 years' work, the man behind Cathy Come Home reveals the tragedy that changed his world

Television has treated Tony Garnett well over the past 50 years. He lives in an apartment close to the Ritz Hotel, where Margaret Thatcher died, a far cry from his working class childhood roots in Erdington, Birmingham. His local cafe is Fortnum & Mason, where he wields a silver teapot with aplomb, but he still declares: "I am a revolutionary socialist. I think our society would benefit from fundamental change."

Charming, kindly, but still angry after all these years, Garnett, 77, was a leader of the generation of radical TV creatives who addressed big social and political issues in their influential BBC dramas of the 1960s and 70s. His work is about to be celebrated in a two-month season, Seeing Red, at London's BFI.

The season opens with his explosive dramas for the BBC's Wednesday Play,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

TV listings and previews: plan your week's viewing - 8-12 October

  • The Guardian - TV News
The magnificent Hunderby signs off in style, Nurse Jackie is back with a bang and Clare Balding kicks of the new series of Have I Got News …

Monday

Wonderland: I Was Once a Beauty Queen

9pm, BBC2

The Miss Great Britain beauty pageants of the 1970s and 80s may look unspeakable nowadays (or at least "a bit naff"), but in their heyday they pulled in millions. This fine, reflective documentary finds out what happened to the winners, now older and wiser; former beauty queens such as Madeleine Stringer (Miss UK 1977) who in reply to the question "And what are you going to be when you grow up?" told a leering, diminutive host: "I don't know … what are you going to be when you grow up?" Ali Catterall

8 Out Of 10 Cats

10pm, Channel 4

Season 14 of the shouty 8 Out Of 10 Cats, which in the panel show stakes sits somewhere between the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ken Loach: 'the ruling class are cracking the whip'

The leftwing film director talks about the riots, his early work on television and the documentary he made for Save the Children 40 years ago that is about to be screened for the first time

About halfway through our interview, I call Ken Loach a sadist. The mild-mannered, faintly mole-like film director blinks hard, chuckles, and carries on. We are discussing a key aspect of his film-making: the element of surprise. Loach has spent his career depicting ordinary people, telling working-class stories as truthfully as possible, and he works distinctively – filming each scene in order, often using non-professional actors, encouraging improvisation.

They don't tend to see a full script in advance, and move through his films as confused as the audience about what lurks around the next corner. I ask Loach which surprise was most memorable, and he laughs incongruously through a few examples. He talks about an incident when an actor walked through a door,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ken Loach documentary to get first screening after 40 years

Hour-long film made for Save the Children in 1969 will be shown as part of major retrospective at the British Film Institute

The veteran film director Ken Loach is used to having his works banned, but none have previously had to wait more than 40 years for a public showing.

His television documentaries on trade unions in the 1980s were pulled from broadcasting and his film Hidden Agenda found few cinemas willing to show it. In September, however, an hour-long documentary film that he made for the Save the Children charity in 1969 is finally to get an airing as part of a major retrospective at the British Film Institute (BFI).

The reasons for the ban remain obscure. It seems to have had something to do with the director's pugnacious take on race, class and charity in a capitalist society, or perhaps the quotation from Engels that prefaced what was supposed to be
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Soundtrack Review: "Up The Junction" Comes To CD

  • CinemaRetro
By Darren Allison, Cinema Retro music critic

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Peter Collinson’s directorial career may have been cut tragically short (he died of cancer at the age of 44), but the British born director left an indelible mark in cinema during the latter half of the 1960s. Collinson made a powerful debut with the disturbing The Penthouse (1967), a film which caused Film Review magazine to comment, ‘quite brilliantly achieved.’ In 1969 his contribution to cinema would become eternally cemented with the classic The Italian Job, a film that turned Michael Caine’s popular Charlie Croker into a movie legend. In between these two projects, Collinson directed the gritty drama Up the Junction (1968). The film centred on a mixed class romance between middle-class Polly (Suzy Kendall) and working-class Peter (Dennis Waterman). Most of Up the Junction’s soundtrack (Rpm 189) was written by Mike Hugg and Manfred Man. It may have
See full article at CinemaRetro »

John Mackenzie obituary

Film director whose career took him from gritty television plays to Hollywood thrillers

People who talk wistfully of the "golden age of British television drama" are often accused of viewing the past through the rosy lens of nostalgia. But a clear-eyed examination of the era proves that such slots as the BBC's The Wednesday Play (1964-70) and Play for Today (1970-84) were unsurpassed as breeding grounds for talented directors such as John Mackenzie, who has died after a stroke aged 83. Like most of his contemporaries who gained their experience by working in television – Philip Saville, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Ken Loach, Mike Newell, Michael Apted and Mike Leigh – Mackenzie went on to make feature films, notably his superb London-based gangster picture, The Long Good Friday (1980).

The television background trained Mackenzie to work quickly on taut and realistic narratives, within a tight budget and on schedule. One of his first jobs was as
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

John Mackenzie obituary

Film director whose career took him from gritty television plays to Hollywood thrillers

People who talk wistfully of the "golden age of British television drama" are often accused of viewing the past through the rosy lens of nostalgia. But a clear-eyed examination of the era proves that such slots as the BBC's The Wednesday Play (1964-70) and Play for Today (1970-84) were unsurpassed as breeding grounds for talented directors such as John Mackenzie, who has died after a stroke aged 83. Like most of his contemporaries who gained their experience by working in television – Philip Saville, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Ken Loach, Mike Newell, Michael Apted and Mike Leigh – Mackenzie went on to make feature films, notably his superb London-based gangster picture, The Long Good Friday (1980).

The television background trained Mackenzie to work quickly on taut and realistic narratives, within a tight budget and on schedule. One of his first jobs was as
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Roger Daltrey To Rock The Who's Tommy For Charity

Roger Daltrey will perform The Who’s Tommy as part of the Teenage Cancer Trust’s one week series of concerts at the Royal Albert Hall next month.

An evening of comedy kicks off the seven star-studded nights on Monday 21 March. The evening includes Liverpudlian stand-up and comedy award winner, John Bishop, Edinburgh festival favourites and TV regulars Kevin Bridges and Greg Davies, plus other very special guests.

On Tuesday 22 March Squeeze will be joined by an 18 piece orchestra giving a new twist to their inimitable South East London style. Since reuniting in 2007, Squeeze have undertaken four major sold out tours of the Us and UK and have become firm festival favourites, with hits like Up The Junction, Tempted and Cool For Cats. Long-time friends and collaborators, The Feeling, will be special guests on the night, alongside a few other surprise appearances.

Read more
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Frank Jarvis obituary

Actor best known for his role as one of the Italian Job gang

Frank Jarvis, who has died suddenly aged 69, was a prolific actor with a particular commitment to theatre. He did, however, have a minor claim to film immortality as one of the gang of cockney villains, led by Michael Caine, who pull off a robbery, but do not quite get away with it, in The Italian Job (1969). Greeted upon its initial release as merely one of many caper movies (a view that persists in the Us), repeated television screenings in Britain have given it status as a minor classic.

Jarvis's role was as a getaway driver, well-dressed and continually smoking. It was representative of his screen work during the 60s and 70s, which almost always centred on crime, whether he was cast as crook or copper. He was thin-faced and slim of build, with dark hair slicked down by Brylcreem,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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